Now showing items 21-40 of 7167

    • Active agents of change: A conceptual framework for social iustice-orientated citizenship education

      Egan-Simon, Daryn; University of Chester (Sage Publications, 2022-05-03)
      Social justice–orientated citizenship education (SJCE) can help young people to develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions to work collectively towards solutions to problems such as human rights violations, global poverty and environmental sustainability (DeJaeghere and Tudball, 2007; Banks, 2017; Hartung, 2017). Furthermore, SJCE can enable young people to think critically, consciously and compassionately and allow them to grow intellectually with a concern for equality and justice. This paper presents a conceptual framework for SJCE for educators and educational researchers wishing to explore citizenship education within social justice contexts. The framework is based on four constitutive elements: agency, dialogue, criticality and emancipatory knowledge, and has its philosophical foundations deeply rooted in the values and principles of critical pedagogy (Kincheloe, 2004; McLaren, 2014; Giroux, 2016). This conceptual framework for SJCE is ultimately concerned with developing justice-orientated active agents of change who are concerned with making the world more democratic, equitable and just.
    • N-3 fatty acid supplementation mediates lipid profile, including small dense LDL, when combined with statins: a randomized double blind placebo controlled trial.

      Dogay Us, Gediz; Mushtaq, Sohail (2022-09-01)
      Epidemiological and clinical evidence suggests that high-dose intake of omega 3 fatty acids (n-3 FA) have a favorable role in altering serum triglycerides (TG) and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) when combined with statins in hyperlipidemic patients. Their efficacy in altering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) particle size is yet to be established. This study evaluated the effects of supplementing 4 g/day Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on serum blood lipids, including small, dense LDL-C particle concentration, in hyperlipidemic patients receiving stable statin therapy. In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind parallel group study, 44 patients on statin therapy for > 8 weeks with non-HDL-C concentrations above 130 mg/dL were randomized into two groups. For 8 weeks, together with their prescribed statin, the intervention group received 4 g/day EPA + DHA (3000 mg EPA + 1000 mg DHA in ethyl ester form) and the placebo group received 4 g/day olive oil (OO). Measurements of serum non-HDL-C, TG, total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL-C (including large - LDL I; intermediate - LDL II; and small - LDL III subclasses), very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) concentration, were taken at baseline and post-intervention. Dietary intake was assessed with a weighed intake, 3-day food diary at week 4. Primary outcome measures were percent change in LDL III, non-HDL-C and LDL particle number. At the end of treatment, the median percent change in serum LDL III concentration was significantly greater in the n-3 FA group plus atorvastatin compared to placebo (- 67.5% vs - 0%, respectively; P < 0.001). Supplementation with n-3 FA plus atorvastatin led to significant reductions in serum non-HDL-C (- 9.5% vs 4.7%, P < 0.01), TG (- 21.5% vs 6.2%, P < 0.001) and VLDL-C (- 36.9% vs 4.0%, P < 0.001) and TC (- 6.6% vs 2.1%, P < 0.001). Between the groups, no significant difference in percent change in the serum concentration of LDL-C, HDL-C, as well as in the LDL I and LDL II subclasses was observed. In this group of hyperlipidemic patients on a stable statin prescription, OM3 plus atorvastatin improved small dense LDL concentrations, non-HDL-C, VLDL-C and TG to a greater extent than atorvastatin alone. Further studies are warranted in this area. This trial was retrospectively registered on 23 May 2019 on ClinicalTrials.gov with ID: NCT03961763. [Abstract copyright: © 2022. The Author(s).]
    • Book review of 'Science Fiction, Disruption and Tourism'

      Hay, Jonathan; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2022-02-25)
      Book review of 'Science Fiction, Disruption and Tourism'
    • Afrofuturism in clipping.’s Splendor & Misery

      Hay, Jonathan; University of Chester (Strange Attractor Press, 2022-09-13)
      This article examines the manner by which clipping.’s 2016 album Splendor & Misery—a conceptual hip-hop space opera—freely enlists and reclaims texts from the African cultural tradition in order to manifest its Afrofuturist agenda. A countercultural movement characterised by a dynamic understanding of the narrative authority held by texts, Afrofuturism rewrites African culture in a speculative vein, granting African and Afrodiasporic peoples a culturally empowered means of writing their own future. The process by which Afrofuturism reclaims and rewrites culture is paralleled within Splendor & Misery through the literary device of mise en abyme; just as the album itself does, its central protagonist rewrites narratives of African cultures and traditions in an act of counterculture.
    • Towards a Latter-day Saint Theology of Religions: Living theologically in a pluralist world

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester
      This article will draw on the experiences of the presenter as a Latter-day Saint who has been involved in teaching world religions and in inter-faith activities over the last 30 years in striving to accomplish two tasks. First, with regard to Latter-day Saint belief it seeks to formulate a theology of religions. To assist with the construction of a theology of religions the paper will utilize existing Christian scholarship on theology of religions. This will argue that the debate surrounding theologies of religion and engagement with other religions from the perspective of wider Christianity can be used to help to develop a Latter-day Saint approach to these issues. The role of any theology of religions should not be merely to inform a person’s belief but also to provide a basis for inter-faith relationships. Thus the second task of this paper is to explore how a Latter-day Saint theology of religions may influence the Church and its members’ engagement with other religions. The main argument will be that Latter-day Saint involvement in inter-faith conversation can continue to flourish, but must do so with a much firmer background and idea of intent. Establishing a theological background for dialogue will provide Latter-day Saints with a greater understanding of why these interactions are important, and will offer the principles that conversations should uphold and be guided by. This article begins an exploration of the framework for inter-faith dialogue within a pluralist world. The main writings within Mormonism with regard to other religions have tended to focus on surface convergence and have sometimes been apologetic in nature. Other writings have been of the attitude that Mormonism should stand independent from the world and its religions. This article attempts to posit a middle way, where both strands of Latter-day Saint teaching are respected. While some Mormon engagement with other religions has been taking place, the majority has been focused on particular traditions with no systematic development of a theological paradigm for such engagement.
    • Measuring Emotions and Empathy in Educational Leadership

      Lambert, Steve (IGI Global, 2022-06-24)
      Educational leadership combines transformational and transactional leadership. Yet this combination is not equal, instead favouring transformational leadership which is focused on an individual's social interactions and their ability to identify and react empathetically to others. Many leadership theorists suggest the ability to have and display empathy is an important part of leadership. Until recently the focus of determining an individual's ability to recognise emotions has been through self-reporting questionnaires. These can only be used to report manifestations in our body, picked up by self-awareness, such as anger, sadness, and joy. Therefore, individuals are reporting their awareness of and externalising of the sensation based on what they perceive the emotion to be. This chapter explores the use of neuroscientific techniques to better understand empathy. What this chapter highlights are that these techniques are more accurate at measuring an individual's ability to recognise emotions than the traditional self-reporting questionnaire.
    • For a Zemiology of Politics

      Davis, Howard; White, Holly; University of Chester; Edge Hill University (Sage Publications, 2022-09-09)
      A zemiology of politics is required in the face of disastrous historic, contemporary and future social harms. Focusing on state-led politics, the article charts some politically generated or mediated social harms: military; ecological and economic. These can generate justificatory narratives of zemiogenic deceit and ignorance. In a contemporary political moment of authoritarian populism, nativism and racism, each feature as part of wider processes towards the corruption and destruction of politics. The article then suggests some of the potentials of healthy politics and fundamental principles for a zemiology of politics including: subordination of crime-centric criminology to a historically grounded international zemiology, the incorporation of agnotological perspectives, and an orientation that is public, inclusive, reflexive and non-fundamentalist.
    • Correction: Wiśniewska et al. Heterospecific Fear and Avoidance Behaviour in Domestic Horses (

      Wiśniewska, Anna; orcid: 0000-0003-1127-2960; Janczarek, Iwona; orcid: 0000-0001-9032-8840; Wilk, Izabela; orcid: 0000-0001-7958-2303; Tkaczyk, Ewelina; orcid: 0000-0003-4495-7413; Mierzicka, Martyna; Stanley, Christina R; orcid: 0000-0002-5053-4831; Górecka-Bruzda, Aleksandra; orcid: 0000-0002-2770-2278 (2022-08-10)
      The authors wish to make the following correction to this paper [...].
    • The effects of allogrooming and social network position on behavioural indicators of stress in female lion-tailed macaques (Macaca silenus)

      Yates, Kerrie; Stanley, Christina R.; Bettridge, Caroline; Manchester Metropolitan University; University of Chester; Bangor University (Elsevier, 2022-08-28)
      Allogrooming serves an important social function in primates and confers short term benefits such as parasite removal and stress-relief. There is currently mixed evidence as to the immediate impact of allogrooming on an individual’s stress levels, which may be influenced by their role in the grooming dyad, position in their social network, or their relationship with their grooming partner. In this study of seven captive adult female lion-tailed macaques (Macaca silenus) in a mixed sex group at Chester Zoo, UK, we found evidence to support a tension-reduction function of allogrooming. Focal animal sampling showed that the duration of self-directed behaviour (SDB), which indicates moderate to high levels of stress, was significantly lower in the five-minute period following allogrooming than the five-minute minute period preceding it for both recipients and groomers. However, when compared to match-control periods, both SDB rates and durations were significantly lower across all individuals in the five-minute period both before and after allogrooming, indicating that although allogrooming reduces stress, it is also more likely to occur when individuals are already in a relatively relaxed state. The rate and duration of SDB post-grooming did not correlate with the strength of a dyad’s bond (based on proximity). This suggests that it is the act of allogrooming itself, rather than the identity of the partner, that reduces stress for both parties. Analysis of the proximity network highlighted a clear cost to social integration; node strength, a measure of the number and strength of an individual’s direct relationships, positively correlated with the duration of self-directed behaviour, suggesting that more gregarious individuals may experience higher levels of stress. These findings add to the growing body of literature that examines the effect of the individual social environment on primate stress levels, and also highlight the need to further investigate the link between social integration and the stress experienced by group-living animals.
    • From Physical to Virtual: Reflections on the Move from the Lecture Hall to the Digital Classroom

      Lafferty, Moira E.; Roberts, Emma; University of Chester; Aberystwyth University
      This chapter describes our reflections on the lived experiences during the rapid pivot to Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT) in March 2020. Drawing on the narratives of academics from two disciplines – Law and Psychology, we focus on the Continuing Professional Learning and Development (CPLD) offered in the immediate aftermath of the initial UK lockdown. We further describe the support available to staff as they scaffolded and supported students through the transition to online learning. Such students, although accustomed social digital users, were less skilled in digital learning, having chosen to study in-person within a physical campus-based institution. We conclude by making recommendations for sustainable training and development as we move towards the implementation of a blended learning experience for campus learners.
    • Hans Frei, 1922-1988

      Fulford, Ben; University of Chester
      An overview of the life and theology of Hans W. Frei.
    • What's Wat's Dyke? Wrexham Comic Heritage Trail (English & Welsh Language Booklets)

      Williams, Howard; Swogger, John; University of Chester
      We hope this comic heritage trail for Wrexham helps introduce you to Britain's third-longest ancient monument
    • What’s Wat’s Dyke? Wrexham Comic Heritage Trail

      Williams, Howard; Swogger, John; University of Chester (JAS Arqueologia, 2021-10-26)
      The publication of the English version of the What's Wat's Dyke? comic in the Offa's Dyke Journal.
    • N-3 fatty acid supplementation mediates lipid profile, including small dense LDL, when combined with statins: a randomized double blind placebo controlled trial

      Mushtaq, Sohail; Dogay Us, Gediz; University of Chester; Maastricht University (BMC, 2022-09-01)
      Background: Epidemiological and clinical evidence suggests that high-dose intake of omega 3 fatty acids (n-3 FA) have a favorable role in altering serum triglycerides (TG) and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) when combined with statins in hyperlipidemic patients. Their efficacy in altering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) particle size is yet to be established. Aim: This study evaluated the effects of supplementing 4 g/day Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on serum blood lipids, including small, dense LDL-C particle concentration, in hyperlipidemic patients receiving stable statin therapy. Methods: In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind parallel group study, 44 patients on statin therapy for > 8 weeks with non-HDL-C concentrations above 130 mg/dL were randomized into two groups. For 8 weeks, together with their prescribed statin, the intervention group received 4 g/day EPA + DHA (3000 mg EPA + 1000 mg DHA in ethyl ester form) and the placebo group received 4 g/day olive oil (OO). Measurements of serum non-HDL-C, TG, total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL-C (including large - LDL I; intermediate - LDL II; and small - LDL III subclasses), very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) concentration, were taken at baseline and post-intervention. Dietary intake was assessed with a weighed intake, 3-day food diary at week 4. Primary outcome measures were percent change in LDL III, non-HDL-C and LDL particle number. Results: At the end of treatment, the median percent change in serum LDL III concentration was significantly greater in the n-3 FA group plus atorvastatin compared to placebo (− 67.5% vs − 0%, respectively; P < 0.001). Supplemen- tation with n-3 FA plus atorvastatin led to significant reductions in serum non-HDL-C (− 9.5% vs 4.7%, P < 0.01), TG (− 21.5% vs 6.2%, P < 0.001) and VLDL-C (− 36.9% vs 4.0%, P < 0.001) and TC (− 6.6% vs 2.1%, P < 0.001). Between the groups, no significant difference in percent change in the serum concentration of LDL-C, HDL-C, as well as in the LDL I and LDL II subclasses was observed. Conclusion: In this group of hyperlipidemic patients on a stable statin prescription, OM3 plus atorvastatin improved small dense LDL concentrations, non-HDL-C, VLDL-C and TG to a greater extent than atorvastatin alone. Further stud- ies are warranted in this area.
    • Quantifying the hip-ankle synergy in short-term maximal cycling

      Burnie, Louise; Barratt, Paul; Davids, Keith; Worsfold, Paul; Wheat, Jon; Northumbria University; Sheffield Hallam University; English Institute of Sport; BAE Systems Digital; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2022-08-24)
      Simulation studies have demonstrated that the hip and ankle joints form a task-specific synergy during the downstroke in maximal cycling to enable the power produced by the hip extensor muscles to be transferred to the crank. The existence of the hip-ankle synergy has not been investigated experimentally. Therefore, we sought to apply a modified vector coding technique to quantify the strength of the hip-ankle moment synergy in the downstroke during short-term maximal cycling at a pedalling rate of 135 rpm. Twelve track sprint cyclists performed 3 × 4 s seated sprints at 135 rpm, interspersed with 2 × 4 s seated sprints at 60 rpm on an isokinetic ergometer. Data from the 60 rpm sprints were not analysed in this study. Joint moments were calculated via inverse dynamics, using pedal forces and limb kinematics. The hip-ankle moment synergy was quantified using a modified vector coding method. Results showed, for 28.8% of the downstroke the hip and ankle moments were in-phase, demonstrating the hip and ankle joints tend to work in synergy in the downstroke, providing some support findings from simulation studies of cycling. At a pedalling rate of 135 rpm the hip-phase was most frequent (42.5%) significantly differing from the in- (P = 0.044), anti- (P < 0.001), and ankle-phases (P = 0.004), demonstrating hip-dominant action. We believe this method shows promise to answer research questions on the relative strength of the hip-ankle synergy between different cycling conditions (e.g., power output and pedalling rates).
    • Understanding the contribution of intellectual disability nurses: Scoping research - Volume 1 of 3: Scoping literature review report

      Mafuba, Kay; Forster, Marc; Chapman, Hazel M.; Kiernan, Joann; Kupara, Dorothy; Chester, Rebecca; Kudita, Chiedza; University of West London; University of Chester; Edge Hill University; Berkshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust
      Introduction This scoping review of literature is the first part of a 3-phase project. The RCN Foundation commissioned the University of West London and their collaborators to undertake scoping research on understanding the contribution of nurses to improving the health and well-being of children, adults and older people with intellectual disabilities, now and for the future. The overall aim of the research is to identify nursing-led and / or nursing centred interventions that are in place to address the challenging and changing needs of people with intellectual disabilities. The research sought to identify interventions, that can be implemented by nurses working in multi-disciplinary teams. The research identifies areas of good care delivery, any innovative practices, and possible gaps in the provision of care for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Objective The overall objective of this review is to summarise evidence on the contribution of intellectual disability nurses to improve the health and well-being of children, adults and older people with intellectual disabilities, now and for the future. Methods We searched the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) Reports, Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Academic Search Elite, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (Global) also known as Index to Theses, ETHOS, UK Government publications, and professional organisations’ publications. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (for Scoping Reviews) (PRISMA-ScR) process and Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) guidance was used to select the literature for review and to present the literature review report (Tricco et al., 2018; Peters et al., 2017). A mixed methods approach to the review and synthesis was used due to the heterogeneous nature of the evidence. JBI tools were used to rate studies for quality. Thematic synthesis was used to generate analytical themes. Results We retrieved 121 publications. Of these we excluded 35 after initial appraisal. We appraised 86 publications and excluded 33 after appraisal and we included 53 publications in this review. We identified a wide range of interventions (154) performed by intellectual disability nurses in a variety of settings across the lifespan. We categorised the intellectual disability nursing interventions into three themes; effectuating nursing procedures, enhancing impact of services, and enhancing quality of life. The majority of publications reported cross-sectional studies (77%), 6% of publications were literature reviews, and 17% were opinion papers. Only two of the primary studies investigated the effectiveness of intellectual disability nurse interventions. The majority of the publications focused on interventions related to adults (31). Not all publications focussed on a particular age group. One publication referred to maternity, five focussed on interventions relevant to children, ten identified interventions relevant to all age groups, five focussed on older adults, five focussed on end of life interventions and one publication was not clear. Conclusions We identified 154 interventions performed by intellectual disability nurses in a variety of settings. We categorised the interventions into three themes; Effectuating nursing procedures (52 interventions), Enhancing impact of services (73 interventions), and Enhancing quality of life (41 interventions). Publications identifying the interventions performed by intellectual disability nurses in relation to maternity, children, older adults and end of life care were limited. Publications did not demonstrate the impact and effectiveness of interventions. This advocates for high quality research being essential in determining the impact and effectiveness of intellectual disability nursing interventions across the lifespan. We recommend that a searchable online compendium of intellectual disability nurse interventions be established and regularly reviewed.
    • Understanding the contribution of intellectual disability nurses: Scoping research. Volume 3 of 3 – Compendium of intellectual disability nursing interventions.

      Mafuba, Kay; Chapman, Hazel M.; Kiernan, Joann; Kupara, Dorothy; Chester, Rebecca; Kudita, Chiedza; City University, London; University of Chester; Edge Hill University; Berkshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust
      Introduction The RCN Foundation commissioned the University of West London and their collaborators to undertake scoping research on understanding the contribution of nurses to improve the health and well-being of children, adults and older people with intellectual disabilities (ID), now and for the future. The overall aim of the research was to identify nursing led and or nursing centred interventions that address the challenging and changing needs of people with ID. This, the ‘Compendium of ID nursing interventions’ provides a catalogue of these interventions. The research project report is in three volumes; Volume 1/3: Scoping literature review report; Volume 2/3: Scoping survey research report; and Volume 3/3: Compendium of intellectual disabilities nursing interventions (this volume). Methods In phase 1 of the project, we undertook a scoping literature review using the Joanna Briggs Institute’s (JBI) scoping review protocols. We used the PRISMA-ScR process and JBI guidance to select the literature for review and to present the literature review report (Trico, et al., 2018; Peters, et al., 2017). A mixed methods approach to the review and synthesis was used due to the heterogeneous nature of the evidence. JBI tools were used to pool findings and rate them for quality. Thematic synthesis was used to generate analytical themes. Empirical (quantitative, qualitative, mixed methods) studies, synthesised evidence (literature reviews) and opinion papers, (n = 52) were included in the review (see volume 1 of the report). In phase 2 of the project, we undertook an online survey to collect quantitative and qualitative data. There were 230 participants from 7 countries. We used thematic, and content analyses to analyse qualitative data. We undertook descriptive and inferential analyses of quantitative data (see volume 2 of the report) Emerging ID nursing interventions In total we identified 925 interventions. In phase 1 we identified 154 ID nursing interventions, and in phase 2 we identified 878 interventions. The discrepancy in the total numbers is that interventions which appeared in both phases are only recorded once. In phase 2, these interventions were undertaken in a wide range of settings and across the lifespan. We categorised the interventions into five themes; effectuating nursing procedures, enhancing impact of ID services, enhancing impact of mainstream services, enhancing quality of life, and enhancing ID nursing practice. We have merged the interventions we identified in the literature review and from the table below. We have removed duplicates and merged the evidence sources where appropriate.
    • Understanding the contribution of intellectual disability nurses: Scoping research Volume 2 of 3: Scoping survey research report

      Mafuba, Kay; Chapman, Hazel M.; Kiernan, Joann; Kupara, Dorothy; Chester, Rebecca; Kudita, Chiedza; University of West London; University of Chester; Edge Hill University; Berkshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust
      Introduction This scoping research identifies nursing-led and or nursing centred interventions that are in place to address the changing needs of people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Aims The aim of the research is to identify nursing-led and / or nursing centred interventions that are in place to address the challenging and changing needs of people with ID. The research identifies interventions, that can be implemented by nurses working in multi-disciplinary teams. The research also identifies areas of good care delivery, innovative practices, and possible gaps in the provision of care for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Methods We undertook an online survey to collect quantitative and qualitative data. We used voluntary response sampling to collect data from 230 participants from 7 countries. Participants were primarily registered intellectual disabilities nurses working with people with ID. We used thematic, and content analyses to analyse qualitative data. We undertook descriptive and inferential statistical analyses of quantitative data, specifically we undertook Pearson correlations and Pearson Chi-square analyses. Results We identified 878 interventions from 7 countries. These interventions were undertaken in a wide range of settings and across the lifespan (maternity (4), children (156), adults (384), older adults (129), all age groups (393) and end of life (19). We categorised the interventions into five themes; effectuating nursing procedures, enhancing impact of ID services, enhancing impact of mainstream services, enhancing quality of life, and enhancing ID nursing practice. We identified several case studies that demonstrate the positive impact of ID nursing interventions. Conclusions ID nurses implement a wide range of emerging interventions working in multi-disciplinary teams. They practice in a wide range of settings in the UK and other countries. More work is needed in order to better understand the reasons for the limited involvement of ID nurses with pregnant women with IDs and in end-of-life care. The variation in understanding the interventions undertaken by ID nurses between countries need to be further investigated.
    • Postnatal Protein Intake as a Determinant of Skeletal Muscle Structure and Function in Mice-A Pilot Study

      Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia; Pollock, Natalie; Aljuaid, Turki; Sannicandro, Anthony J.; Alameddine, Moussira; Owen, Euan; Myrtziou, Ioanna; Ozanne, Susan E.; Kanakis, Ioannis; Goljanek-Whysall, Katarzyna; et al. (MDPI, 2022-08-08)
      Sarcopenia is characterised by an age-related decrease in the number of muscle fibres and additional weakening of the remaining fibres, resulting in a reduction in muscle mass and function. Many studies associate poor maternal nutrition during gestation and/or lactation with altered skeletal muscle homeostasis in the offspring and the development of sarcopenia. The aim of this study was to determine whether the musculoskeletal physiology in offspring born to mouse dams fed a low-protein diet during pregnancy was altered and whether any physiological changes could be modulated by the nutritional protein content in early postnatal stages. Thy1-YFP female mice were fed ad libitum on either a normal (20%) or a low-protein (5%) diet. Newborn pups were cross-fostered to different lactating dams (maintained on a 20% or 5% diet) to generate three groups analysed at weaning (21 days): Normal-to-Normal (NN), Normal-to-Low (NL) and Low-to-Normal (LN). Further offspring were maintained ad libitum on the same diet as during lactation until 12 weeks of age, creating another three groups (NNN, NLL, LNN). Mice on a low protein diet postnatally (NL, NLL) exhibited a significant reduction in body and muscle weight persisting up to 12 weeks, unlike mice on a low protein diet only prenatally (LN, LNN). Muscle fibre size was reduced in mice from the NL but not LN group, showing recovery at 12 weeks of age. Muscle force was reduced in NLL mice, concomitant with changes in the NMJ site and changes in atrophy-related and myosin genes. In addition, μCT scans of mouse tibiae at 12 weeks of age revealed changes in bone mass and morphology, resulting in a higher bone mass in the NLL group than the control NNN group. Finally, changes in the expression of miR-133 in the muscle of NLL mice suggest a regulatory role for this microRNA in muscle development in response to postnatal diet changes. Overall, this data shows that a low maternal protein diet and early postnatal life low-protein intake in mice can impact skeletal muscle physiology and function in early life while postnatal low protein diet favours bone integrity in adulthood.