Now showing items 1-20 of 5016

    • When Speaking English Is Not Enough: The Consequences of Language-Based Stigma for Nonnative Speakers

      Birney, Megan E.; orcid: 0000-0002-6786-6322; Rabinovich, Anna; Morton, Thomas A.; Heath, Hannah; Ashcroft, Sam (SAGE Publications, 2019-11-06)
      We explored the effects of language-based stigma on the relationship between native and nonnative speakers. In two studies, we found that stigmatized nonnative speakers experienced more negative interpersonal interactions, higher levels of intergroup threat, and reduced performance on an English test compared with nonnative speakers who did not experience stigma. These effects were mediated by anxiety and moderated by prevention-related goals. Furthermore, native speakers perceived stigmatized (vs. not-stigmatized) speakers’ accents as stronger and their commitment to living in the host country as weaker. Our findings suggest that experiencing language-based stigma can (a) incite a stereotype threat response from nonnative speakers, and (b) damage their relationship with native speakers on an interpersonal and intergroup level.
    • Fighting Putin and the Kremlin’s grip in neo-authoritarian Russia: The experience of liberal journalists

      Slavtcheva-Petkova, Vera (SAGE Publications, 2017-05-16)
      Russia is one of the most dangerous countries for journalists, and the conflict with Ukraine and Russia’s involvement in Syria present even further challenges for the future of Russian journalism. In addition to the financial pressures, physical attacks, abductions and harassment, liberal journalists now face an increasing threat to the democratising role they see themselves as playing. President Vladimir Putin’s soaring popularity and the elaborate range of tactics used to suppress press freedom are forcing liberal media to rethink their mission(s) and identity(ies). This article presents empirical evidence on the range of tactics used by the Russian authorities as well as the coping strategies adopted by journalists. The study shows that some Russian media and journalists demonstrate a great degree of resilience in their efforts to expose wrongdoings and hold the powerful to account. The article questions the applicability of Western-centric normative media system theories because it shows that the breadth, depth and mechanisms of control in modern-day Russia are very different from the ones used during Soviet times, and yet, Russian media and society do not appear to be on a linear journey from authoritarianism to democracy. The article presents the findings of a semi-ethnographic study of some of Russia’s most influential liberal news outlets – Novaya Gazeta, Radio Echo of Moscow and Radio Free Europe/Liberty. The study was conducted in May 2014 in the midst of the conflict with Ukraine. It involved observations of editorial meetings, documentary analysis and interviews with editors, deputy editors and journalists.
    • Conceptions of ‘research’ and their gendered impact on research activity: a UK case study

      Healey, Ruth L.; orcid: 0000-0001-6872-4900; Davies, Chantal; orcid: 0000-0002-0532-7366 (Informa UK Limited, 2019-08-31)
    • Long Grove Asylum Medical Journal

      Daly, Tim; University of Chester
      The piece documents the disposal of a large scale Edwardian asylum complex that closed in 1992. I documented the aftermath of the site from 1993-98, before private development into an executive housing estate. Unbeknownst to me and at the same time, county archivist Julian Pooley was rescuing abandoned documents, medical journals, ephemera and artefacts from the same location. These would later be housed in the Surrey History Centre in Working. The work is a coming together of these two collections with new documentary photographs of the estate as it is today. The work takes the form of a dossier, styled as a large medical journal and contains multiple elements which can be viewed in any order. Alongside photographs taken in situ are photographs of the artefacts held in the archives, creating an unusual mixture of primary and secondary documentation. Within the dossier are details from large hand-written registers left abandoned at the site, chronicling the patient journey from admission onwards. In addition to these formal records, the dossier also includes ephemera relating to the hospital's social programme, a portfolio of curiously redacted press photographs, team photographs of the medical staff, maps and patients personal effects all of which were left abandoned.
    • De-smokeGCN: Generative Cooperative Networks for Joint Surgical Smoke Detection and Removal

      Chen, Long; Tang, Wen; John, Nigel W.; Wan, Tao Ruan; Zhang, Jian Jun; Bournemouth University; University of Chester; University of Bradford
      Surgical smoke removal algorithms can improve the quality of intra-operative imaging and reduce hazards in image-guided surgery, a highly desirable post-process for many clinical applications. These algorithms also enable effective computer vision tasks for future robotic surgery. In this paper, we present a new unsupervised learning framework for high-quality pixel-wise smoke detection and removal. One of the well recognized grand challenges in using convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for medical image processing is to obtain intra-operative medical imaging datasets for network training and validation, but availability and quality of these datasets are scarce. Our novel training framework does not require ground-truth image pairs. Instead, it learns purely from computer-generated simulation images. This approach opens up new avenues and bridges a substantial gap between conventional non-learning based methods and which requiring prior knowledge gained from extensive training datasets. Inspired by the Generative Adversarial Network (GAN), we have developed a novel generative-collaborative learning scheme that decomposes the de-smoke process into two separate tasks: smoke detection and smoke removal. The detection network is used as prior knowledge, and also as a loss function to maximize its support for training of the smoke removal network. Quantitative and qualitative studies show that the proposed training framework outperforms the state-of-the-art de-smoking approaches including the latest GAN framework (such as PIX2PIX). Although trained on synthetic images, experimental results on clinical images have proved the effectiveness of the proposed network for detecting and removing surgical smoke on both simulated and real-world laparoscopic images.
    • Rethinking our treatment of animals in light of Laudato Si’

      Clough, David L.; University of Chester
      The encyclical Laudato Si’ builds on and extends previous Roman Catholic church teaching on animals to affirm their value as beloved creatures of God and reject anthropocentric claims that they were created merely to provide for human needs. It draws on the Franciscan tradition to affirm other animals as our sisters and brothers, and notes that these relationships have implications for our treatment of animals. The encyclical fails to connect concern for other-than-human animals with critiques of industrial animal agriculture, however, which is an odd omission given its consideration of other practical issues such as the genetic manipulation of plant and animals, its express concern for biodiversity, and its call for an ecological conversion in the context of climate change. This chapter begins by surveying the valuable framework the encyclical sets up for understanding the place of animals in Christian theology and ethics. It then describes how we are using animals for food today. Finally, it makes the case that the encyclical’s framework demands obvious and urgent changes in the way we make use of other animals for food.
    • ECOSYSTEM HEALTH AS THE BASIS FOR HUMAN HEALTH

      Barker, Tom; Fisher, Jane (John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2018-11-02)
    • Evaluation of the Broseley Health Technology Pilot

      Mabhala, Mzwandile A.; Bailey, Jan; Davies, Miriam; Enyinna, Chinwe; University of Chester
      This document reports on the evaluation of a health technology pilot, which was delivered by Shropshire Council’s Public Health Team. This service evaluation explored the usability and acceptability of three consumer smart devices in a group of older adults who live within the community. The devices are the “Echo Dot”, “Echo Show” and “Fitness Tracker”. The intention of the evaluation was to identify whether these devices meet the needs of its users, their experiences using the equipment and the impact of having and using this equipment.
    • Automated Hyperlink Text Analysis of City Websites: Projected Image Representation on the Web

      Weismayer, Christian; Pezenka, Ilona; Loibl, Wilhelm
      The objective of this study is to identify the image representations of 75 European cities on the Web. As an effective image positioning strategy will result in successful differentiation from competitors, it is crucial for tourism destinations to regularly examine their image. This study focuses on the supply-side of destination image formation and is therefore concerned with analysing the projected destination image. Hyperlink text of DMO websites was collected automatically by a crawler. The text was then edited and filtered. Latent semantic dimensions were generated by applying PCA. A hierarchical cluster approach revealed different groups of hyperlink terms. Finally, the co-occurrence of terms and cities was displayed in a joint-map indicating which groups of hyperlink terms are over- or underrepresented for each of the cities. This information permits conclusions regarding the projected image of the cities.
    • Policing the Cyber Threat: Exploring the threat from Cyber Crime and the ability of local Law Enforcement to respond

      Eze, Thaddeus; Hull, Matthew; Speakman, Lee; University of Chester (Proceedings of the IEEE, 2019-07-01)
      The landscape in which UK policing operates today is a dynamic one, and growing threats such as the proliferation of cyber crime are increasing the demand on police resources. The response to cyber crime by national and regional law enforcement agencies has been robust, with significant investment in mitigating against, and tackling cyber threats. However, at a local level, police forces have to deal with an unknown demand, whilst trying to come to terms with new crime types, terminology and criminal techniques which are far from traditional. This paper looks to identify the demand from cyber crime in one police force in the United Kingdom, and whether there is consistency in the recording of crime. As well as this, it looks to understand whether the force can deal with cyber crime from the point of view of the Police Officers and Police Staff in the organisation.
    • Art_Textiles

      Bristow, Maxine; University of Chester (Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester, United Kingdom, 2015-10-10)
      'Barrier, ref: 9774-14', is a series of 10 modular sculptural components, 5 of which were exhibited as part of the international 'Art_Textiles' exhibition at The Whitworth Gallery, Manchester 10 October 2015-31 January 2016. Occupying four main galleries, 'Art_Textiles' brought together works dating from the 1960s to the present day by 27 artists from around the world who use textiles as a powerful tool for expressing ideas about the social, political and artistic. The exhibition included iconic feminist pieces from the 1970s by Magdalena Abakanowicz, Faith Wilding, Miriam Shapiro, Elaine Reichek as well as contemporary works by artists such as Grayson Perry, Tracey Emin and Lubana Himid. A 96 page catalogue with a forward by the Whitworth's director Maria Balshaw, introductory essay by deputy director and curator of the exhibition Jennifer Harris and further essays by Pennina Barnett and Julia Bryon-Wilson accompanied the exhibition. Designed so that they could be variably (re)configured according to the exhibition and installational context, the modular sculptural components take the form of temporary barriers or handrails which play between a work of art and functional object. As a free standing form, the handrail directs us through space, but it also operates as a barrier which divides space, defines boundaries and alternately either denies or allows access. Articulating space in a physical way, the work also addresses the broader metaphorical connotations of borders and boundaries and their implications in terms of traditional discourses of power. Whilst the work creates a boundary that dictates the movement of the viewer and affords significance to the space that it delineates, the boundary is clearly arbitrary and open to revision. Consciously referencing seminal hard-edged minimalist modular configurations such as Donald Judd’s floor-based open frame-like structures, these works are upholstered and intricately embroidered through the labour intensive process of darning. However, rather than take centre stage, they might easily be mistaken for institutional furniture, where the self-effacing labour intensity of their production could go unnoticed. For the 'Art_Textiles' exhibition they formed a barrier around the artist Susan Collis's work which similarly involves an enormous amount of hidden labour and plays with our perceptions of everyday objects, whereas in previous configurations they have quietly protected the more spectacular work of Grayson Perry.
    • Pre-season training responses and their associations with training load in elite rugby league players

      Daniels, Matthew; Highton, Jamie; Twist, Craig (Informa UK Limited, 2019-05-07)
    • A Mile Apart

      Connolly, Lynne; University of Chester (Lynne Connolly, 2017-10-18)
      Abstract: This paper explores through the use of photography, a parallel mapping of the ‘unspoken’ domestic sphere, the myth of the safety of home, and set against political and external events in a unique period of recent history. It is focused on Belfast, Northern Ireland and the period of ‘The Troubles’. It examines the nature of the space we inhabit, the vernacular, the everyday and how this might influence our identity. Drawing on the work of Bachelard (1969) it will also explore how the vernacular can be located in a different time frame, and therefore allows for a new representation and perspective. The recreation of a wholly new space that partially exists in our experience and further exists in our interpretation of that through memory. It exists in our own parallel universe of understanding wherein we become spectators in the drama of our past. In this research the camera is working in a reversal of representation, using potentially unreliable memory to recreate moments of past events. These moments are often fragments or elements of scenarios. It is not the reliability of memory that is in question but rather the need to have validation of a remembered thing in speaking and visualising of it. Through a series of constructed images, this paper will explore this journey of representation, memory and how the photographic mnemonic becomes a device to explore divergent memories in relation to the home as well as external influences on identity and memory.
    • The Cheshire Magna Carta: distinctive or derivative?

      White, Graeme J. (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2017-12-12)
    • Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) modifies energy metabolism via 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase signalling in malignant cells

      Austin, James A.; orcid: 0000-0002-5384-5221; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Austin, Gemma M.; Glenn, Mark A.; Dunn, Karen; Scott, Laura; Lucas, Claire M.; Clark, Richard E. (Portland Press Ltd., 2019-08-15)
      Abstract Cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A) is an adverse biomarker across many malignancies. Using K562 cells engineered to have high or low CIP2A expression, we show that high CIP2A levels significantly bias cellular energy production towards oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) rather than glycolysis. Mass spectrometric analysis of CIP2A interactors and isobaric tagging for relative and absolute protein quantitation (ITRAQ) experiments identified many associated proteins, several of which co-vary with CIP2A level. Many of these CIP2A associating and co-varying proteins are involved in energy metabolism including OXPHOS, or in 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signalling, and manipulating AMPK activity mimics the effects of low/high CIP2A on OXPHOS. These effects are dependent on the availability of nutrients, driven by metabolic changes caused by CIP2A. CIP2A level did not affect starvation-induced AMPK phosphorylation of Unc-51 autophagy activating kinase 1 (ULK-1) at Ser555, but autophagy activity correlated with an increase in AMPK activity, to suggest that some AMPK processes are uncoupled by CIP2A, likely via its inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). The data demonstrate that AMPK mediates this novel CIP2A effect on energy generation in malignant cells.
    • Fieldwork@40: fieldwork in geography higher education

      Haigh, Martin; France, Derek (Informa UK Limited, 2018-09-09)
    • When the personal Call to Ordained Ministry is not recognised by the Church: Implications for Selection and Pastoral Care

      Routledge, Robin; Dyer, Anne; Gubi, Peter M. (University of ChesterUniversity of Chester, 2019-05-01)
      The effect of not being recommended for ordained ministry when a person is convinced of their personal Calling can be devastating, and it is a phenomenon that is under-researched. The research question is: ‘How does having one’s sense of vocation for ordained ministry rejected by the Church impact at a psychological and theological level?’ The aims of the research are: To explore how having one’s sense of vocation for ordained ministry rejected by the Church impacts on individuals at a psychological and theological level; and to better understand the implications for selection and pastoral care. The core purpose of this research is to enable better pastoral care during and after the discernment and selection processes. Structured by Swinton’s and Mowat’s (2006) Practical Theological Reflection model and contextualised within the Church of England, eight Diocesan Directors of Ordinands (DDOs) [Stage 1] and nine non-recommended applicants (NRAs) [Stage 2] were interviewed to determine their experience of selection and how they theologically and psychologically made sense of non-selection. The data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. In Stage 1, four superordinate themes emerged: Vocation; Selection processes; Theological perspective; Pastoral care; along with thirty-seven subordinate themes. In Stage 2, four superordinate themes emerged: Pursuing ordination; BAP experience; Pastoral care; Making sense; along with twenty-three subordinate themes. The thick data reveal the lived experiences and ‘sense-making’ of the participants from psychological and theological perspectives. In reformulating revised practice, a number of recommendations are made, that: a) the way that vocations are ‘marketed’ and encouraged needs refocussing; b) the vulnerability surrounding the process of responding to Calling to ordained ministry is akin to a ‘coming out process’; c) appropriate training is provided for incumbents and congregations to raise their awareness of the issues surrounding non-recommendation; d) incumbents be in Pastoral Supervision; e) training be given to Vocations Advisors, DDOs and Bishops which highlights the ways that spiritual abuse and inappropriate behaviour can occur in the discernment process; f) dioceses work more coherently to establish ‘best practice’ in the discernment process; g) safeguarding systems be put in place centrally to which candidates can complain/appeal when perceived spiritual abuse or inappropriate behaviour occurs; h) there is greater transparency in the sharing of reports and references with applicants; i) Canon C4 be reassessed; j) counselling be offered to candidates throughout the process of discernment, and after, as needed; k) the value of the BAP process be re-evaluated; l) opportunity for debriefing immediately after the BAP be offered; m) the wording of reports consider the impact of the words on the recipient; n) the discernment process pays attention to other forms of vocation than ordained ministry; o) issues of sexual discrimination are mitigated against and prohibited.
    • Living and learning through song.

      Poole, Simon E. (University of Chester, 2019-01)
      autoethnography is concerned with the tension between innovation and tradition in the craft of songwriting and the learning this allows for. It is formed by two parts; the following written thesis and a choral song entitled ‘The Walk to Kitty’s Stone’. The work draws upon my own experiences whilst writing this song and qualitative data obtained through recorded discussions with other songwriters, with whom I am part of a folk group called ‘the loose kites’. The thesis is structured and viewed through a folkloristic lens. Bausinger’s work and his concepts of the spatial, temporal and social horizons expanding provide this lens and offer a theoretical framework for folk culture in the digital world to be investigated. Two research methods of songwriting are used within this framework to consider the learning that occurs. The first method allows for an expression of a psychogeographical understanding using a machine called a ‘Perambulographer’ which enabled me to draw graphic scores for composition while walking. The second method was an exercise in ekphrastic lyric writing. Learning is considered in terms of informal education, and music pedagogy and as such builds upon Green’s research. The key interpretations from the research highlight notions of authenticity, respect, political awareness and democratic values as significant features of songwriting. This study does not offer any new pedagogy but instead highlights how songwriting as ‘craft-based practice as research’ might offer an opportunity for songwriters to appreciate the relationships and values that they embody in their practice, specifically with regards to their own identity, when teaching. The work proposes that a songwriter’s home and folk culture has a significant influence on their identity and how they write songs. The main advance in practice is the development of a theory of ‘be-longing’ underpinning the advocacy of a folkloristic disposition in the context of education.
    • Making and Relational Creativity: An exploration of relationships that arise through creative practices in informal making spaces

      Adams, Jeff; Bulkeley, Jane; Bennett, Lindsey, H (University of ChesterUniversity of Chester, 2019-09-27)
      This thesis investigates the connections between making and relational creativity, exploring relationships that arise through creative practices in informal making spaces. As the researcher, my background is that of both artist and educator, and I combine both roles to work alongside students within the space. The aims of the study are to explore the impact such spaces have on teachers professional relationships with students together with the impact on student relationships. In addition, the research also aims to address the implications of informal making spaces for the school curriculum in England. The research is centred around the A/R/Tography Collective, a making space created to allow students the opportunity to meet and create after school outside of lesson time. The research builds on the democratic learning practices of Room 13 and Reggio Emilia models of learning. Using a qualitative approach within a narrative paradigm in the form of case study, I work alongside students within the field. By employing an immersive approach where field notes were written up retrospectively and reflected upon, I have been able to offer a holistic and balanced account of both my own and participant experiences, exposing the complexities and problematic nature of creative practices emerging outside of the curriculum framework. My findings reveal that by deconstructing traditional pedagogical frameworks, the lived experiences of students are revealed through the process of making, providing a unique insight into their lives. The findings suggest that the current art and design curriculum in England is not meeting the needs of students, and recommends the value of making spaces that exist outside of the curriculum framework to enhance learner experience. The research recommends that by allowing students freedom of expression within curriculum time, relationships between students and teacher are developed and strengthened. This in turn positively impacts on student performance within curriculum time. The research recommends the need for educators to inhabit a more holistic role, to tailor their pedagogy to meet the individual, ever changing needs of students.
    • The influence of CLA on obesity, lung function, adipokines and inflammation

      Williams, John; Ireland, Elsye; Hamdallah, Hanady (University of ChesterUniversity of Chester, 2019-01-31)
      Obesity is currently widespread in the world; the epidemic and pathogenesis of the disease negatively affect several body systems including cardiovascular, endocrine and respiratory systems. Obesity influences the respiratory functions and this effect could be challenging for women, because the air way and lungs are smaller in women compared to men, as well as obesity itself exerts a negative mechanical effect on the women’s airway. Since inflammation was proposed asthe main link between obesity and lung functions, a natural supplement like conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), which has been proposed as an antiinflammatory and anti-obesity food component, could be a potential supplement that can improve the lung functions in obese women. Therefore, the aim of this thesis is to explore the effect of CLA on obesity, lung function, adipokines and inflammation. Additionally, the effect of CLA on inflammation in the current thesis was explored using novel inflammatory markers, such as adhesion molecules (CD11b and CD62L) and heat shock proteins (HSPA1A and HSPB1). Investigating the evidence about the effect of CLA supplementation on obesity in women was conducted via a systematic review with meta-analysis. The meta- analysis searched randomised control trials (RCTs) supplemented CLA mixture in form of oral capsules for less than 6 months. Two search strategies were applied, and eight eligible trials were included with 330 women. CLA significantly reduced body weight (BW; 1.2±0.26 kg, p<0.001), body mass index (BMI; 0.6 ±0.13 kg/ m², p <0.001) and total body fat (TBF; 0.76± 0.26 kg, p=0.003) when it was supplemented for short durations (6- 16 weeks). Moreover, subgroups meta-analyses were conducted which were based on obesity level, menopausal age and life style of the participants. This meta-analysis suggested a mild anti-obesity effect of CLA. However, it was not clear whether the anti-obesity effect is enough to modulate obesity-induced inflammation and lung functions. Therefore, initially a crosssectional trial was conducted to assess the direct associations between the circulating level of CLA and obesity markers, lung functions and inflammations. To the best of Knowledge, this was the first cross-sectional trial that explored these direct associations. The cross-sectional trial recruited 77 women with average age 39 years old with forced expiratory volume in one-second (FEV1) ≥70%. The level of CLA in plasma was assessed by gas chromatography; the expression of the CD markers and HSPs were assessed using flow cytometry; body composition was assessed using bioelectric impedance; and lung functions were assessed using spirometer. Interestingly, the trial revealed significant positive associations between CLA and BW (R=0.4, p<0.001), BMI (R=0.4, P<0.001) and TBF (R=0.34, P<0.001) in the overall population, and in perimenopause women. A significant inverse correlation between t10, c12-CLA and TBF was detected in overweight women (R=- 0.42, p<0.05). A significant positive association (R=0.45, P<0.04) was detected between the c9, t11-CLA and percentage peak of flow predicted (PEF %) in postmenopausal women, meanwhile t10, c12-CLA was negatively associated with peak of flow (R=-0.44, P<0.04). CLA was inversely associated with adiponectin in both obese (R=-0.55, p<0.1) and morbidly obese (R=0.48, P<0.004) women. C9, t11-CLA was positively associated with the expression of HSPA1A inside the lymphocytes in postmenopausal women (R=0.58, p=0.04). HSPB1 expression in the monocytes were associated with both c9, t11-CLA (R=0.58, p<0.05) and total CLA (R=0.71, p<0.001). The level of expression of CD11b on the pro-inflammatory monocytes (CD14++ CD16+ ) was negatively associated with CLA (R=-0.36, p<0.05). Ultimately, the study did not provide strong evidence regarding the direct relationship between CLA and obesity markers or lung functions. However, it showed a potential immunomodulatory effect of CLA on obesity-induced chronic inflammation, which subsequently could influence multiple obesity compilations. The lack of strong evidencewas primarily due to the nature of the study design (observational study). Therefore, in chapter 5 a randomised double-blind placebo control trial was conducted, for more powerful evidence based. The aim of the RCT was to look at the effect of 12-week CLA supplementation on obesity, lung function, adipokines and inflammation in obese and overweight women. The RCT recruited 56 overweight and obese women with a mean age of 42 years old, participants were randomly assigned either to receive 4.5gm/day of CLA or placebo (High Oleic Safflower oil). Participants had to attend three clinics at base line, after 6 weeks and after 12 weeks. In each clinic body composition, lung functions and inflammatory markers were assessed. The study revealed a significant 1.8% reduction in %BF in the CLA group compared to the baseline. No significant effect of CLA on the lung functions was detected, however, this study found a significant reduction in the expression of CD11b on the stimulated pro-inflammatory monocytes after 12 weeks compared to baseline in the CLA group. CLA caused a significant reduction in the expression of intracellular HSPA1A in PBMCs at week 12 compared to baseline. The results might suggest a limited anti-obesity effect of CLA, and a potential positive effect on obesity induced chronic inflammation. Ultimately, no evidence was demonstrated on the direct effect of CLA on lung functions or adipokines. The effect of CLA on adhesion molecules and HSPA1A could suggest an indirect impact on the lung function, but more research in clinically diagnosed patients with pulmonary dysfunctions could help to confirm the effect of CLA on the lung function and adipokines.