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dc.contributor.advisorHogard, Elaineen
dc.contributor.authorLittle, Victoria*
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-21T11:55:03Z
dc.date.available2010-04-21T11:55:03Z
dc.date.issued2005-11
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/97035
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to gain understanding into compliance behaviour with aspirin as prescribed for secondary prevention of stroke. The study used a convenience sample of 20 patients who had been admitted to a NHS Trust following a subsequent stroke or transient ischaemic attack. Semi-structured interviews were used to explore the use of aspirin at the time of admission. Patient perception of personal risk and risk factors for stroke were explored. Where appropriate, responses were checked against health care records for comparison. The findings suggested that the majority of patients were compliant with aspirin, however deficiencies in current practice were identified. Patients lacked awareness of their risk factors and their risk of having a further stroke. They were also unaware why they were taking aspirin. Strategies that assisted compliance behaviour and reasons for non-compliance were identified.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Liverpool (University College Chester)en
dc.subjectcomplianceen
dc.subjectnon-complianceen
dc.subjectrisk perceptionen
dc.subjectstrokeen
dc.titleKnowing and complying: Patient awareness of aspirin use for secondary prevention of stroke and transient ischaemic attacken
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.publisher.departmentArrow Park Hospitalen
dc.type.qualificationnameMScen
dc.type.qualificationlevelMasters Degreeen
refterms.dateFOA2018-08-13T14:56:44Z
html.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to gain understanding into compliance behaviour with aspirin as prescribed for secondary prevention of stroke. The study used a convenience sample of 20 patients who had been admitted to a NHS Trust following a subsequent stroke or transient ischaemic attack. Semi-structured interviews were used to explore the use of aspirin at the time of admission. Patient perception of personal risk and risk factors for stroke were explored. Where appropriate, responses were checked against health care records for comparison. The findings suggested that the majority of patients were compliant with aspirin, however deficiencies in current practice were identified. Patients lacked awareness of their risk factors and their risk of having a further stroke. They were also unaware why they were taking aspirin. Strategies that assisted compliance behaviour and reasons for non-compliance were identified.


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