• Securing field learning using a twenty-first century Cook's Tour

      Fuller, Ian C.; France, Derek; Massey University; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2015-01-22)
      This paper evaluates the effectiveness of incorporating digital video into a traditional Cook’s Tour as part of a 7-day road trip around the east coast of New Zealand’s North Island over a 4-year period.
    • Seeing the city anew: Asylum seeker perspectives of ‘belonging’ in Greater Manchester

      Darling, Jonathan; Healey, Ruth L.; Healey, Lauren; University of Manchester ; University of Chester ; Independent Artist (Manchester Geographical Society, 2012)
      This paper explores the experiences of three asylum seekers in Greater Manchester through the use of experimental autophotographic walking tours. The paper focuses on discussions of belonging within geography and examines how three asylum seekers constructed varied senses of belonging in Greater Manchester through specific places, objects and communities. Using walking tours designed by the research participants to visit places of meaning in their everyday lives and photography of key sites, the paper explores the ways in which those awaiting asylum decisions experienced Greater Manchester.
    • Seismic and volcanic hazards in Peru: Changing attitudes to disaster mitigation

      Degg, Martin; Chester, David; University College Chester ; University of Liverpool (Blackwell, 2005-07-05)
      This article discusses how the United Nations sponsored International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction (IDNDR 1990–2000) has led to increased co-operation between earth scientists and social scientists, focusing on the example of Peru.
    • Should you be using mobile technologies in teaching? Applying a pedagogical framework

      France, Derek; Lee, Rebecca; Maclachlan, John; McPhee, Siobhán; University of Chester; McMaster University; University of British Columbia
      The extent of how mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, are seamlessly incorporated into the personal day-to-day life is not often considered by University instructors. Unfocused incorporation of mobile technologies into the classroom can de-emphasize intended learning objectives if students struggle using the technology itself or by acting as a distraction. The effective inclusion of mobile technology is not a simple process as the inclusion needs to be purposeful and have the potential to improve the student learning environment, while working alongside more traditional face-to-face learning. This paper presents a pathway to help instructors address both pedagogical and technological considerations of incorporating mobile learning into the curriculum. The pathway developed through the adaptation of the iPAC framework, feedback from international practitioners and tested with worked examples. In all cases the instructors’ reflective responses to the eight pathway questions indicate a clear structured activity, engaged students, and considers equal access, prior experience and contingency planning. This pathway indicates an effective methodology for instructors to assess whether the mobile learning intervention is appropriate and adds value to their teaching. Further external evaluation of the pathway with additional teaching examples will enhance the effectiveness of the methodology.
    • Slope–channel coupling between pipes, gullies and tributary channels in the Mocatán catchment badlands, Southeast Spain

      Faulkner, Hazel; Alexander, Roy; Zukowskyj, Paul; University of Middlesex ; University of Chester ; University of Hertforshire (Wiley, 2007-10-18)
      This article attempts to develop a conceptual model of the way geologic, topographic, material property and ecological factors combine to explain the complex geomorphological evolution of the Mocatán catchment badlands in Almería, Spain.
    • Some Observations on Human-Landscape interactions in Almería

      Alexander, Roy; University of Chester
      Extended abstract of Keynote presentation delivered at EcoDesert Symposium, Almería, February 2019.
    • Staff-student partnership: Inclusive/exclusive pedagogical practices

      Moore-Cherry, Niamh; Healey, Ruth L.; University College Dublin; University of Chester (RAISE, 2018-04-30)
      This workshop focused on student-staff partnership working in a mass education system. Specifically we explored whether in a mass education system we can, and should, engage in partnership working that goes beyond just selected staff and students to become mainstream pedagogical practice.
    • Steaming through the past

      France, Derek; Chester College of Higher Education (English Nature, 1997-07)
      This journal article discusses the Llangollen rail trail which aims to introduce the geology and geomorphology of the Vale of Llangollen during the train journey to Carrog.
    • Striking a professional balance: interactions between nurses and their older rural patients

      Corbett, Sophie; Williams, Fiona; University of Aberdeen (Mark Allen Publishers, 2014-04-07)
      Close relationships between older adults and their health-care professionals in community settings can enhance wellbeing and support positive health in older age. In rural areas, health-care workers may know their patients socially as well as professionally, and roles are mediated. This article reports the findings from 16 qualitative interviews with older adults and health and social care professionals in rural areas of Wales. The study found that the sharing of non-clinical information in rural home-care situations is both likely and desirable, supporting the sense of social connectedness experienced by the older adult, contributing towards the development of the nurse/carer–client relationship and improving older adult wellbeing. However, it is recognised that there is potential for boundaries to become blurred and, in some situations, nurses and carers may need support to negotiate the divide between appropriate and inappropriate disclosure while maintaining a close relationship with the older adult.
    • Student authored atlas tours (story maps) as geography assignments

      Treves, Richard; Mansell, Damien; France, Derek; Queen Mary University London; University of Exeter; University of Chester
      Atlas Tours consist of collections of animated maps and other elements woven together to make a narrative, they are a commonly used format on the web. Recent developments in software platforms such as Esri Story Maps have made producing them possible by Geography students. The study uses student written feedback and focuses groups about a module where stu- dents produce an Atlas Tour as an assignment. This is used to advocate the use of student-produced Atlas Tours in Geography teaching, the main argument proposed is that Atlas Tours are an excellent format to enable students to learn and practise graphical literacy (graphicacy). Despite this educational opportunity, Atlas Tours can cause practical problems for students and suggestions are made to mitigate this issue. Two other pedagogical strands are also advocated: Students being empowered to exercise creativity in creating Atlas Tours and how Atlas Tours are particularly well suited to fieldwork assignments.
    • Student perceptions of iPads as mobile learning devices for fieldwork

      Welsh, Katharine E.; Mauchline, Alice; Powell, Victoria; France, Derek; Park, Julian R.; Whalley, W. Brian; University of Chester (2015-09-01)
      This paper reports findings from six field courses about student’s perceptions of iPads as mobile learning devices for fieldwork. Data were collected through surveys and focus groups. The key findings suggest that the multi-tool nature of the iPads and their portability were the main strengths. Students had some concerns over the safety of the iPads in adverse weather and rugged environments, though most of these concerns were eliminated after using the devices with protective cases. Reduced connectivity was found to be one of the main challenges for mobile learning. Finally, students and practitioners views of why they used the mobile devices for fieldwork did not align.
    • A Sustainable Future in the Making? The Maker Movement, the Maker-Habitus and Sustainability

      Collins, Rebecca; University of Chester (Routledge, 2018-04-06)
      Recent years have seen the emergence of what has been termed a new ‘maker movement’. Alternately cast either as an essentially new mode of engagement with the practices and potentialities of making instigated by the development of new technologies, or a (re)turn to the fundamentals and rewards of traditional crafts, opportunities to practice making in an array of forms are increasingly widespread. Whilst there has been some (limited) acknowledgement of the role a (re)valorisation of making might play in a more environmentally sustainable material culture (e.g. Brook 2012), how such connections might be made and supported has remained unexplored. This chapter draws on both theoretical and empirical sources in order to articulate a conceptual ‘maker-habitus’ – an embodied orientation to the material world characterised by an interest in material (re)production. I argue that fundamental to the ‘maker-habitus’ is a particularly acute affordance sensitivity – that is, an ability to identify the potentialities of materials and material things. Recent empirical work is used to illustrate this notion at work and, in turn, to suggest that increasing societal support for the proliferation of such sensibilities might be key to eliciting a more environmentally sustainable everyday material culture.
    • Transitioning to Organic Rice Farming in Thailand: Drivers and Factors

      Miller, Servel; Seerasarn, Nareerut; Wanaset, Apinya; University of Chester; Sukhothai Thammathirat; Open University
      The Thai government has made it part of the long-term strategy to produce more organic rice, particularly for the Chinese market, to sustain Thai economic growth. However, whilst there has been an increase in organic rice farming, the rate has been relatively slow compared to conventional methods. This research focuses on determining the drivers and factors that influences conversion to organic rice farming in order to better inform local and national policies. It provides an insight into the processes in the decision-making process of famers and the practices they use. Questionnaire and interview data from farmers from the leading rice production region, Surin was analyzed using logistic regression to understand the driver for of organic rice farming and well as the barrier and challenges of adopting to this practice. The findings highlight the critical role of extension farm officers in promoting, educating and motivating farmers to take on organic farming. The ability to access (affordable) loans through local cooperative and land-ownership were also key motivational factors. Young people (under 25) are not engaging with farming generally and this is a major barrier to long-term growth in the organic rice industry in Thailand.
    • THE USE TOPOGRAPHIC DATABASE FOR NON STANDARD PROJECTS

      Miller, Servel; Malgorzata, Leszczynska; University of Chester; University of Warmia (2017-07-05)
      The touristic maps are the one of the most popular and widely used among the society type of map. However the ones are not official map and no government entity of Poland responsible for producing and distributing this types of maps. Therefore they are not free for local governments. Tourist on line maps are an ideal way for cities and region to promote their local business community. Indeed, it is estimated that hundred billion is spent on travel and tourism annually in the Poland. This is why local governments spend a large financial outlay for the creation of online tourist maps. But the tourist maps created base on non-standardized and official source become quickly outdated and update them is expensive. It seems to be good solution use constantly updated topographic databases for produce tourist maps to promote cities. The one is funded with taxes therefore can be usable without fees for public entities and it is national resource not classified for national security reasons. The series of articles about use topographic database for non-standard project topics will present an algorithm and legal and technological limitations appearing during the attempts to use topographic maps to create online tourist maps base on topographic databases. The article is an introduction to this subject.
    • Using historical source data to understand urban flood risk: a socio-hydrological modelling application at Gregorio Creek, Brazil

      Ana Carolina, Sarmento Buarque; Bhattacharya-Mis, Namrata; Fava, Maria Clara; Souza, Felipe Augusto Arguello de; Mendiondo, Eduardo Mario; University of Sao Paulo (USP), Brazil; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2020-04-24)
      The city of São Carlos, state of São Paulo, Brazil, has a historical coexistence between society and floods. Unplanned urbanization in this area is a representative feature of how Brazilian cities have developed, undermining the impact of natural hazards. The Gregório Creek catchment is an enigma of complex dynamics concerning the relationship between humans and water in Brazilian cities. Our hypothesis is that social memory of floods can improve future resilience. In this paper we analyse flood risk dynamics in a small urban catchment, identify the impacts of social memory on building resilience and propose measures to reduce the risk of floods. We applied a socio-hydrological model using data collected from newspapers from 1940 to 2018. The model was able to elucidate human–water processes in the catchment and the historical source data proved to be a useful tool to fill gaps in the data in small urban basins.
    • Variations in soil dispersivity across a gully head displaying shallow subsurface pipes, and the role of shallow pipes in rill initiation

      Faulkner, Hazel; Alexander, Roy; Teeuw, Richard; Zukowskyj, Paul (John Wiley & Sons, 2004-08-20)
      This article discusses how three-dimensional patterns of geochemistry and sediment size can be related to hydraulic gradients in the local marl bedrock of Almería in southern Spain.
    • Wave-emplaced boulders: implications for development of "prime real estate" seafront, North Coast Jamaica

      Miller, Servel; Rowe, Deborah-Ann; Brown, Lyndon; Mandal, Arpita; University of Chester; University of the West Indies (Springer, 2013-11-17)
      Jamaica has a long history of damage to the built environment in coastal areas due to storm surge and tsunami. However, there is limited scientific data to aid the establishment of minimal setback distances and to inform mitigation strategies. Developers of coastal area require cost-effective methods to guide their decisions and to develop mitigation strategies to reduce the potential risk posed to development. This paper explores the use of wave-emplaced boulders to determine the wave heights from historical storm surge/tsunami on the North Coast of Jamaica. As most of the study area was undeveloped priory to 1960, there are limited historical written records of storm surges and/or tsunami impact for this specific site. This research undertook geomorphic mapping of the proposed study area to determine the presence, location, spatial distribution, size, density and volume of wave emplaced boulders along a 2-km stretch of coastline earmarked for development. Based on the wave-emplaced boulders mapped, it was possible to determine the approximate wave heights associated with storms and/or tsunami required to deposit them. The implications for development are discussed. The study of wave-emplaced boulders has provided a rapid and cost-effective method to determine minimal setback distance and the approximate height of waves associated with storms and/or tsunami. The technique developed may be transferable to other areas of coastline earmarked for development along the Jamaican coastline
    • Wetlands in southern Africa

      Ellery, William N.; Grenfell, Suzanne E.; Grenfell, Michael C.; Powell, Rebecca; Kotze, Donovan C.; Marren, Philip M.; Knight, Jasper; Rhodes University (Ellery, Powell); University of the Western Cape (Grenfell, S; Grenfell, M); University of Natal (Kotze); University of Melbourne (Marren); University of the Witwatersrand (Knight) (Cambridge University Press, 2016-06-23)
      In southern Africa, wetlands of different types are an integral part of the drainage network, yet evolve and are sensitive to different combinations of geologic, climatic, geomorphic, edaphic and hydrologic controls. Understanding of these controls can help in the interpretation of environmental and climatic records from different wetland types, given that wetland sensitivity to environmental and climatic changes may vary throughout their ‘life cycle’. The chapter discusses inland wetland records from dated sites in South Africa in order to consider their significance for reconstructing late glacial and Holocene climates; and the relationship of wetlands to preservation of the Pleistocene archaeological record. Wetlands are sensitive to degradation under contemporary environmental and climatic changes, which may impact on their hydrological and ecological function as well as the integrity of associated archaeological sites.
    • Would Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) be welcomed by undergraduate students to support their learning during fieldwork?

      Welsh, Katharine E.; Mauchline, Alice; France, Derek; Powell, Victoria; Whalley, W. Brian; Park, Julian R.; University of Chester; University of Reading; University of Sheffield (Taylor & Francis, 2018-02-15)
      This paper reports student perceptions of the benefits and challenges of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) in a fieldwork context. Student perceptions from six field courses across two institutions have been gathered using questionnaires and focus groups. Whilst a number of studies have focused on BYOD in a classroom context, little research has been undertaken about BYOD in a fieldwork context. The key findings suggest that around one fifth of students were not willing to use their own device during fieldwork citing loss or damage as the main reason. This key challenge is different to that which are found in a classroom which generally focus on network security, connectivity etc. The findings also suggest that some students believe that BYOD can have a negative impact on group work. There is a misalignment here between student and practitioner thinking with previous literature which suggests that practitioners believe BYOD and smart devices can enhance group work. The one key challenge which is found regardless of learning environment is inequality between those who have a device and those who do not.
    • Youth transitions as ‘wiki-transitions’ in youth policies platforms

      Cuzzocrea, Valentina; Collins, Rebecca; Universita degli Studi di Cagliari; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2019-11-21)
      In recent years, a number of youth-focused online platforms have emerged which, in different ways, seek to support young people across Europe in building pathways to independent adulthood. In this article, we draw on data from Edgeryders, a recent youth policy research project, to reflect on the extent to which online discussion platforms are useful instruments for understanding the challenges youth face in their transitions to independent adulthood across Europe. Noting the collaborative emphasis articulated by both the project designers and participants, we ask how we might make sense of the data – and the meanings conveyed by that data – produced by online projects. We propose the notion of ‘wiki-transitions’ as a means of theorising young people’s use of online space to support their transitions to adulthood.