• Fashion acolytes or environmental saviours? When will young people have had ‘enough’?

      Collins, Rebecca; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-10-01)
      In the global north, high rates of material consumption show few signs of abating, despite oft-repeated warnings of dire social and environmental consequences. Environmental educators have identified young people as a potentially effective group of change agents, capable of driving a transformative shift in how we consume. Yet this picture of the young environmental ‘saviour’ is at odds with many Western young people’s thirst for the ‘latest’ fashions and trends. This chapter explores how young people themselves make sense of this apparent contradiction. Exploring under-researched questions around young people’s conceptualisations of, and affective and embodied responses to, the notion of ‘enough’, it highlights the cultural and contextual factors which could prove decisive in positioning the notion of ‘enough’ centrally in a sustainability-compatible youth material culture.
    • Field-based pedagogies for developing learners' independence

      Fuller, Ian; France, Derek; Massey University, University of Chester (Edward Elgar, 2019-12-30)
      For fieldwork to be effective in fostering independent thinking it requires careful design and alignment within the degree programme (Fuller et al., 2006; Fuller, 2012). In this chapter we draw from our own research evidence and experience to provide examples that illustrate how fieldwork can be successfully embedded in the geography undergraduate curriculum from first to final year adopting specific pedagogies to develop, enhance, and refine students as independent learners throughout their undergraduate career.
    • Fieldwork Going Digital

      Fuller, Ian C.; France, Derek; Massey University, New Zealand; University of Chester, UK (Elsevier, 2014-12-01)
      This chapter provides examples of best practice in teaching physical geography and geomorphology fieldwork in a range of settings from New Zealand and Europe. Firstly we evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating active learning and synthesis opportunities in a tour of North Island geomorphology, using learner-generated video clips summarizing landscape features, processes and management issues. Secondly, we focus on deploying digital video in field experiments within process geomorphology, which introduce students to sophisticated technology and standard field-sampling procedures. Digital video increases engagement and enjoyment involved in data collection and improves understanding of methods employed. Thirdly, we discuss the use of Web 3.0 Technology in field teaching more broadly in physical geography. Here iPads were primarily used to take photographs, video, browse the web, enter raw data and as a tool to aid reflection, through tweets and short videos. The devices facilitated engagement and group interactions on residential fieldwork.This chapter provides examples of best practice in teaching physical geography and geomorphology fieldwork in a range of settings from New Zealand and Europe. Firstly we evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating active learning and synthesis opportunities in a tour of North Island geomorphology, using learner-generated video clips summarizing landscape features, processes and management issues. Secondly, we focus on deploying digital video in field experiments within process geomorphology, which introduce students to sophisticated technology and standard field-sampling procedures. Digital video increases engagement and enjoyment involved in data collection and improves understanding of methods employed. Thirdly, we discuss the use of Web 3.0 Technology in field teaching more broadly in physical geography. Here iPads were primarily used to take photographs, video, browse the web, enter raw data and as a tool to aid reflection, through tweets and short videos. The devices facilitated engagement and group interactions on residential fieldwork.
    • Fieldwork@40: fieldwork in geography higher education

      Haigh, Martin; France, Derek (Informa UK Limited, 2018-09-09)
    • Fieldwork@40: fieldwork in geography higher education

      France, Derek; Haigh, Martin; University of Chester; Oxford Brookes University (Taylor & Francis, 2018-09-09)
      Fieldwork is the most powerful learning invitation in the toolkit of Geographical Education. This review of papers in The Journal of Geography in Higher Education (JGHE) suggests seven modes in the development of fieldwork. These are arrayed as a kind of historical, perhaps evolutionary, sequence but most remain current in Geography fieldwork practice. At the far end (1960s) of the sequence are didactic modes that are teacher centred and use the field as an adjunct to the classroom, in the middle (1990s) are modes that involve active learning and focus on the development of students as investigators and at the near end (2010s) are those that centred on the field study area and its qualities, that involve concern about the ethics of student engagement and that employ blended learning technologies. The review charts the JGHE’s gradual shift away from its original, almost exclusively, UK-focus toward something rather more international and inclusive. Fieldwork is where Geographers learn “from doing” Geography to “do” Geography. Its special attributes include providing experiential, sometimes transformative, learning through the immersion of the learner in the field experience. In 40 years, JGHE has helped Geography Fieldwork move from the margins of the curriculum to its current place at its core.
    • Flood risk insurance, mitigation and commercial property valuation

      Lamond, Jessica; Bhattacharya-Mis, Namrata; Chan, Faith K. S.; Kreibich, Heidi; Montz, Burrell; Proverbs, David; Wilkinson, Sara; University of the West of England; University of Chester; University of Nottingham Ningbo China; GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences; East Carolina University; Birmingham City University; University of Technology Sydney (Emerald, 2019-04-02)
      To understand how Built Environment professionals approach the valuation of flood risk in commercial property markets and whether insurance promotes mitigation in different insurance and risk management regimes, draw common conclusions, and highlight opportunities to transfer learning. An illustrative case study approach involving literature search and 72 interviews with Built Environment professionals, across five countries in four continents. Common difficulties arise in availability, reliability and interpretation of risk information, and in evaluating the impact of mitigation. These factors, coupled with the heteregenous nature of commercial property, lack of transactional data, and remote investors, make valuation of risk particularly challenging in the sector. Insurance incentives for risk mitigation are somewhat effective where employed and could be further developed, however the influence of insurance is hampered by lack of insurance penetration and underinsurance. Further investigation of the means to improve uptake of insurance and to develop insurance incentives for mitigation is recommended. Flood risk is inconsistently reflected in commercial property values leading to lack of mitigation and vulnerability of investments to future flooding. Improvements are needed in: access to adequate risk information; professional skills in valuing risk; guidance on valuation of flood risk; and regulation to ensure adequate consideration of risk and mitigation options. The research addresses a global issue that threatens local, and regional economies through loss of utility, business profitability and commercial property value. It is unique in consulting professionals across international markets.
    • Flood risk to commercial property: Training and Education Needs of Built Environment Professionals

      Bhattacharya-Mis, Namrata; Lamond, Jessica; Chang, Faith; Kreibich, Heidi; Burrell, Montz; Wilkinson, Sara; Proverbs, David (Emerald, 2018-10-08)
      Improved management of commercial property at risk from flooding may result from well-targeted advice from built environment professionals, such as surveyors, valuers and project managers. However, research indicates that the role of these professionals in providing such advice is currently limited for a variety of reasons. This research aimed to investigate the (perceived and real) barriers and opportunities for providing such advice in a number of international locations. In particular the research sought greater understanding of the link between regulation and guidance; perceived roles and capacity; and training and education needs. In order to cover different international settings an illustrative case study approach was adopted within the selected countries (Australia, UK, US, China and Germany). This involved a qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews of built environment (BE) professionals with experience of advising on commercial properties at risk of flooding. Due to the specific nature of these interviews, a purposive sampling approach was implemented, leading to a sample of 72 interviews across the five international locations. Perceived barriers were linked to regulatory issues, a shortage of suitably experienced professionals, a lack of formal guidance and insurance requirements. BE professionals defined their roles differently in each case study in relation to these factors and stressed the need for closer collaboration among the various disciplines and indeed the other key stakeholders (i.e. insurers, loss adjusters, contractors). A shortage of knowledgeable experts caused by a lack of formal training and education was a common challenge highlighted in all locations. The research is unique in providing an international perspective on issues affecting built environment professionals in providing robust and impartial advice on commercial property at risk of flooding. Whilst acknowledging the existence of local flood conditions, regulatory frameworks and insurance regimes, the results indicate some recurring themes, indicating a lack of general flood risk education and training across all five case study countries. Learning across case studies coupled with appropriate policy development could contribute towards improved skills development and more consistent integration of BE professionals within future flood risk management practice, policy and strategy.
    • Founding Father, PS Njie: A Moral Biography

      Perfect, David (Informa UK Limited, 2019-03-27)
    • Gender Variation in Asylum Experiences in the UK: The Role of Patriarchy and Coping Strategies

      Healey, Ruth L.; University of Chester (Research Centre for Identity and Migration Issues (RCIMI), 2010-09-01)
      Previous work suggests that female asylum seekers and refugees have more constraints on their actions than their male counterparts, as structural forces from the country of origin are reproduced in the host country. This paper explores the use of structuration theory in interpreting the impact of gender upon asylum seeker and refugee experiences in the UK. The experiences of, and coping strategies used by 8 male and 10 female asylum seekers and refugees from two different cities are analysed. Their experiences are examined in relation to different patriarchal forces. In comparison to the males, differences are apparent in the level and types of agency of the female asylum seekers and refugees. Within this study certain types of patriarchy are reproduced in British society particularly at the household level, whilst individuals are also influenced by institutional patriarchy within the wider society. The variation in experiences found here suggests the need for policy to recognise the heterogeneity of these groups, so as to provide the most appropriate support for individuals.
    • Gendered experiences of academic staff in relation to research activity and the REF2014

      Davies, Chantal; Healey, Ruth L.; Cliffe, Anthony D.; University of Chester (2016-06)
      This report is based on research commissioned by the institutional Research and Knowledge Transfer Office between June 2015 and June 2016. This research has focused on generating qualitative and quantitative data as to the potential reasons why there appears to be a gender disparity in research productivity within the commissioning institution. In particular, the number of women self-selecting for representation in the REF2014 was comparatively low. This research was led by Dr Chantal Davies (as part of her broader remit in relation to the Forum for Research into Equality and Diversity) with Dr Ruth Healey as co-researcher and Anthony Cliffe as research assistant. A Steering Group made up of representatives from across the institution oversaw the process.
    • GeogEd: A New Research Group Founded on the Reciprocal Relationship between Geography Education and the Geographies of Education

      West, Harry; Hill, Jennifer; Finn, Matt; Healey, Ruth L.; Marvell, Alan; Tebbett, Natalie; University of the West of England; University of Gloucestershire; University of Exeter; University of Chester; University of Gloucestershire; Loughborough University
      In 2019 the Higher Education Research Group (HERG) formally became the Geography and Education Research Group (GeogEd). What may appear as a simple change in name masks a renewed understanding of the synergies between geography education (at all levels) and the geographies of education. In this paper we contextualise that change through the relationships between the two interrelated fields. We suggest that these fields are integrally linked, iteratively and reciprocally, and that research across both is vital for a truly holistic understanding of each. We reflect on the discussions and process of forming the new Geography and Education Research Group, which we trust is sensitive to the historic remit of HERG while being inclusive to those working in geography and education beyond HE. We conclude by looking ahead to a renewed, inclusive and progressive Research Group, aspiring to be more diverse and enabling fruitful discussions across the geography and education nexus.
    • Geographical Information Systems (GIS) applied to landslide hazard zonation in the North Wales coalfield

      Miller, Servel; Degg, Martin; University of Chester (National Museum Wales, 2015-05-01)
      In areas with a history of slope instability problems, landslide hazard zonation is increasingly becoming an integral tool in the effective management of this hazard (Chauhan et al., 2010; Leventhal and Kotze, 2008; Fells et al., 2008; Moreiras, 2005). Landslide hazard zonation provides the scientific basis for the implementation of land-use, emergency management and loss reduction measures in landslide-prone areas (Haubin et al., 2005). Although such techniques are commonly used worldwide in the management of slope instability, their use has been limited in the UK to a number of localised studies; e.g. South Wales coalfield (Halcrow and Partners, 1989) and Derbyshire Peak District (Thurston, 1997). It has been recognised that there are numerous relict landslides throughout the UK, which are being reactivated due to climatic factors (Arnell and Reynard 1996; Collison, 2000; and Environmental Agency, 2010) as well as land-use changes (Norbury, 2002; Smith, 2002). As indicated by Glade (2003, p3) ‘Land-use change has been recognized throughout the world as one of the most important factors influencing the occurrence of rainfall-triggered landslides’. Hazard mapping and susceptibility modelling (zonation) in landslide-prone areas should be a vital component of land-use planning, particularly where development continues to spread onto slopes deemed unstable. This paper outlines the development of a landslide susceptibility zonation model for areas of solid geology in the North Wales Coalfield and Halkyn Mountain. The model has been validated and has the potential to be utilised in land-use planning at a local and regional level
    • Geotagging photographs in student fieldwork

      Welsh, Katharine E.; France, Derek; Whalley, W. Brian; Park, Julian R.; University of Chester ; University of Chester ; University of Sheffield ; University of Reading (Routledge, 2012-01-23)
      This article provides guidance for staff and students on the potential educational benefits, limitations and applications of geotagging photographs.
    • Graduate attributes: implications for higher education practice and policy: Introduction

      Hill, Jennifer; Walkington, Helen; France, Derek; University of the West of England; Oxford Brookes University; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2016-04-13)
      This publication is an introduction to a collection or a symposium of seven papers themed papers around graduates attributes. They originate from a series of conference sessions convened and chaired by the authors in 2013 at two events: the Royal Geographical Society (with Institute of British Geographers) Annual International Conference held in London, UK, and the Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting held in Los Angeles, USA
    • Gratitude and hospitality: Tamil refugee employment in London and the conditional nature of integration

      Healey, Ruth L. (2014-01-01)
      The policy of integration attempts to address different elements of exclusion, yet relatively little research has considered what integration means to the refugees themselves. This paper explores one key area for supporting integration: employment.
    • Great Games and Keeping it Cool: New political, social and cultural geographies of young people’s environmental activism

      Collins, Rebecca; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2020-11-30)
      Drawing on recent framings of young people’s environmental activism as a ‘game’, alongside long-standing characterisations of youth as responsibilised environmental change-agents, in this Viewpoint I identify fertile research opportunities in the liminal spaces between moments of young people’s action and the political and socio-cultural spaces through which those actions (might) diffuse. I argue that youth geographers should take care to engage critically with young activists’ actions, as well as wider political and cultural responses to them, in order to avoid furthering problematic ‘sustainability saviour’ framings of youth.
    • Healthy Ageing in Smart Villages? Observations from the Field

      Philip, Lorna; Williams, Fiona; University of Aberdeen; University of Chester (Sciendo, De Gruyter, 2019-12-30)
      In the context of demographically ageing communities across rural Europe Smart Villages have considerable potential to promote ageing healthy. Whilst in principle supporting healthy ageing in the context of the Smart Village might appear a relatively straightforward endeavour, in operational terms, successful development of smart, 21st century villages relies upon, and sometimes assumes, an appropriate interplay of socio-technological factors. Articulated through a lens provided by the digital ecosystem model advocated by the European Network for Rural Development (2018), this paper offers some observations from the field. We acknowledge the challenges faced by remote rural places in their journey to become ‘smart places’ and identify formal and informal interventions that could better position rural communities to become part of a wider, smart society.
    • The history of the Higher Education Research Group of the UK Royal Geographical Society: The changing status and focus of geography education in the academy

      Healey, Ruth L.; France, Derek; Hill, Jennifer; West, Harry; University of Chester; University of Gloucestershire; University of the West of England
      The opening paper in our special section sets the scene for the discussions that follow by evidencing and reflecting upon the history of the Higher Education Research Group. We report on the purpose of the Group when it was established in the late 1970s as the Higher Education Learning Working Party, and trace its development to late 2019 when its members voted to change the name of the Group to the Geography and Education Research Group. Through a systematic analysis of the annual reports published in Area (from 1980 to 1994) and the minutes of the Annual General Meetings (from 1998 to 2019), alongside personal correspondence with former members of the Committee, we explore the history of the Group. We contend that the Group has passed through four distinct phases related to the broader geography and education context. The recent re-naming of the Group to publicly codify and celebrate the diversity of links between geography and education represents a fifth phase in the Group’s evolution. Throughout its history, the Group has had strong connections with geographies (and geographers) of education across a range of sectoral levels, indicating that this fifth evolutionary phase aligns well with the Group’s original purpose and vision.
    • How to conduct a literature search

      Healey, Mick; Healey, Ruth L.; University of Gloucestershire; University of Chester (SAGE, 2016-06-04)
      Identifying the most relevant, up-to-date and reliable references is a critical stage in the preparation of a whole range of assessments at university including essays, reports and dissertations, but it is a stage which is often undertaken unsystematically and in a hurry. This chapter is designed to help you improve the quality of your literature search. There is a growing interest in higher education in students undertaking research and inquiry projects and co-inquiring with academics not just in their final year but throughout their undergraduate studies (Healey and Jenkins, 2009; Healey et al., 2013, 2014a, b). Undertaking a thorough literature search is a key element in undertaking a research or inquiry project.