• Badlands in the Tabernas Basin, Betic Chain

      Calvo-Cases, Adolfo; Harvey, Adrian M.; Alexander, Roy; Cantón, Yolanda; Lázaro, Roberto; Solé-Benet, Albert; Puigdefábregas, Juan; University of Valencia, University of Liverpool, University of Chester, University of Almería, CSIC, Almería (Springer, 2014-04-19)
      The complex badland landscape at Tabernas results from a combination of relief amplitude generated by tectonic uplift since the Pliocene and reactivated several times during the Pleistocene, the properties of the Tortonian sedimentary rocks and a predominantly arid climate. The landscape is dominated by deep incision of the main river systems, which continues in part of the headwater tributaries, and characterized by contrasting slope morphologies and a variety of microecosystems. The Tabernas badlands exhibit a diversity of landforms resulting from the combination of multi-age soil surface components that allow a variety of processes to operate at different rates. These are dominated by rilling and shallow mass movements on south-facing hillslopes. On old surfaces and north-facing hillslopes, where biological components are present, overland flow with variable infiltration capacity and low erosion rates prevail. Incision in the gully bottoms occurs in the most active areas.
    • Developing active personal learning environments on smart mobile devices.

      Whalley, Brian; France, Derek; Park, Julian; mauchline, Alice; Welsh, Katharine E.; University of Sheffield, University of Chester, University of Reading (Springer, 2019-10-10)
      ‘Tablets’ and other 'smart' devices (such as iPads and iPhones)have established themselves as a significant part of mobile technologies used in mobile (m-)learning. Smart devices such as iPads and the Apple Watch not only provide many apps that can be used for a variety of educational purposes; they also allow communication between students and tutors and with the world at large via social media. We argue that 'smart' mobile devices enable personalized learning by adjusting to the educational needs of individuals. We refer to Salmon's quadrat diagram to suggest where using mobile technologies should be of benefit to revising our views of pedagogy, making it much more responsive to students' needs in education as well as the world in general. Smart mobile devices now contain computing power to allow voice and face recognition, augmented reality and machine learning to make them intelligent enough to act as tutors for individual students and adjust and respond accordingly. To take advantage of these facilities on mobile devices, pedagogy must change from an institution-centred to a student-tutor-device focus. This is best done via 'active learning' and incorporating cognitive awareness into an educational operating system that can develop with the owner.
    • Enhancing Fieldwork Learning Using Mobile Technologies

      France, Derek; Whalley, W. Brian; Mauchline, Alice; Powell, Victoria; Welsh, Katharine E.; Lerczak, Alex; Park, Julian R.; Bednarz, Robert S.; University of Chester; University of Reading and Texas A&M University (Springer, 2015-10-26)
      This book aims to share and develop pedagogic fieldwork practice of practitioners through the applications of new digital technologies. The book showcases 29 case studies. Fieldwork is a core element of many Bioscience, Geography, Geology, Earth & Environmental Science degree courses. Fieldwork can provide opportunities for experiential learning and research-led teaching in a ‘real-world’ setting. Teaching and learning on fieldwork can be enhanced through the use of digital technologies; tablets provide opportunities to develop novel approaches to fieldwork pedagogy that neither students nor tutors envisaged possible through traditional means.
    • The Right to Healthcare: a critical examination of the restrictions on access to state funded HIV/AIDS treatment for irregular migrants

      Hand, David; Davies, Chantal; Healey, Ruth L.; University of Chester (Springer, 2015-12-15)
      In the UK health care legislation has progressively restricted the rights of irregular migrants to access free medical treatment. Policy discussions concerning allocation of health resources have typically been framed by a perceived need to discourage overseas patients from “taking advantage” of the National Health Service (NHS) – a practise pejoratively known as “health tourism”. This has been particularly true in the context of HIV/AIDS for which treatment is often prohibitively expensive in other countries. Here we undertake a comparative review of health care legislation in the UK and other jurisdictions, looking at how such legislation is shaped by immigration policy, and the extent to which irregular migrants who suffer from HIV/AIDS are able to access treatment. We argue that evidence simply does not support the omnipresent belief that “health tourism” poses a threat to the financial integrity of the NHS.
    • Wave-emplaced boulders: implications for development of "prime real estate" seafront, North Coast Jamaica

      Miller, Servel; Rowe, Deborah-Ann; Brown, Lyndon; Mandal, Arpita; University of Chester; University of the West Indies (Springer, 2013-11-17)
      Jamaica has a long history of damage to the built environment in coastal areas due to storm surge and tsunami. However, there is limited scientific data to aid the establishment of minimal setback distances and to inform mitigation strategies. Developers of coastal area require cost-effective methods to guide their decisions and to develop mitigation strategies to reduce the potential risk posed to development. This paper explores the use of wave-emplaced boulders to determine the wave heights from historical storm surge/tsunami on the North Coast of Jamaica. As most of the study area was undeveloped priory to 1960, there are limited historical written records of storm surges and/or tsunami impact for this specific site. This research undertook geomorphic mapping of the proposed study area to determine the presence, location, spatial distribution, size, density and volume of wave emplaced boulders along a 2-km stretch of coastline earmarked for development. Based on the wave-emplaced boulders mapped, it was possible to determine the approximate wave heights associated with storms and/or tsunami required to deposit them. The implications for development are discussed. The study of wave-emplaced boulders has provided a rapid and cost-effective method to determine minimal setback distance and the approximate height of waves associated with storms and/or tsunami. The technique developed may be transferable to other areas of coastline earmarked for development along the Jamaican coastline