• Ambivalent storage, multi-scalar generosity, and challenges of/for everyday consumption

      Collins, Rebecca; Stanes, Elyse; University of Chester; University of Wollongong (Routledge, 2021-09-05)
      Storage plays an important role in domestic practices as a banal yet essential means of practically accomplishing ‘living together’ and caring for people and material ‘stuff’. However, storage and stored things also occupy a provocative and paradoxical place in debates around the sustainability of household consumption. Driven by renewed popular and scholarly attention to ‘decluttering’ and eschewing anything that does not ‘spark joy’, this paper considers the emotional and practical implications of generosity – as both concept and practice – in articulating the sustainability potential in storage and stored things. In so doing we problematise assumptions about ‘clutter’ as unsustainable. Drawing on vignettes from two projects concerned with material consumption in young adulthood, and drawing on – but going beyond – extant framings of geographies of care, we illustrate how shifting spatial and temporal liminalities of storage mediate opportunities to engage in and with different scales of generosity. We argue that spatialities of storage are often less about deferring acts of divestment than they are a space in which to situate materialisations of significant emotional, care-ful(l) connections. We reflect on the implications of storage for sustainable consumption in the home and suggest how future work drawing on geographies of generosity might usefully enrich our understanding.
    • E-learning for geography's teaching and learning spaces

      Lynch, Kenneth; Bednarz, Robert S.; Boxall, James; Chalmers, Lex; France, Derek; Kesby, Julie; University of Gloucestershire ; Texas A&M University ; Dalhousie University ; University of Waikato ; University of Chester ; University of New South Wales (Routledge, 2008-01)
      This article discusses e-learning from a wide range of teaching and learning contexts. The authors promote the idea that considering best practice with reference to educational technology will increase the versatility of teaching geography in higher education.
    • Embedding research-based learning early in the undergraduate geography curriculum

      Walkington, Helen; Griffin, Amy L.; Keys-Mathews, Lisa; Metoyer, Sandra K.; Miller, Wendy E.; Baker, Richard; France, Derek; Oxford Brookes University ; University of New South Wales ; University of North Alabama ; Texas A&M University ; State University of New York College at Cortland ; The Australian National University ; University of Chester (Routledge, 2011-05-16)
      This article discusses the rationale for embedding research and enquiry skills early in the undergraduate geography curriculum and for making these skills explicit to students. A survey of 52 international geography faculty identified critical thinking, framing research questions, reflectivity and creativity as the most challenging research skills to teach early in the undergraduate curriculum.
    • Geotagging photographs in student fieldwork

      Welsh, Katharine E.; France, Derek; Whalley, W. Brian; Park, Julian R.; University of Chester ; University of Chester ; University of Sheffield ; University of Reading (Routledge, 2012-01-23)
      This article provides guidance for staff and students on the potential educational benefits, limitations and applications of geotagging photographs.
    • How to persuade and influence people: The art of effective geographical debate

      Healey, Ruth; Leatham, Chloe; University of Chester (Routledge, 2021-05-27)
      This article supports students to prepare to participate in a debate. We consider thorough preparation as the foundation for effective debate. Here we provide guidance on one approach to preparing as effectively as possible. We outline this before considering three key elements to this method of preparation: 1) substance: your knowledge and understanding of the debate topic; 2) style: how to present your points clearly and succinctly; and 3) persuasion: how through both substance and style you effectively persuade people of your argument. We conclude by summarising the key points raised in this guide and identifying how they apply to other assignment contexts. The discussion that follows uses the debate topic ‘Should an additional charge be applied to all single-use plastics?’ to demonstrate the approaches we suggest.
    • How to produce a digital story

      France, Derek; Wakefield, Kelly; University of Chester ; Loughborough University (Routledge, 2011-11)
      This article discusses how digital stories (collection of still images, audio and video) can be used to assess geography undergraduates and offers guidance to students on how to create the best digital stories for assessment.
    • Inadvertent environmentalism and the action–value opportunity: reflections from studies at both ends of the generational spectrum

      Hitchings, Russell; Collins, Rebecca; Day, Rosie; University College London; University of Chester; University of Birmingham (Routledge, 2013-11-22)
      A recent turn towards a more contextually sensitive apprehension of the challenge of making everyday life less resource hungry has been partly underwritten by widespread evidence that the environmental values people commonly profess to hold do not often translate into correspondingly low impact actions. Yet sometimes the contexts of everyday life can also conspire to make people limit their consumption without ever explicitly connecting this to the environmental agenda. This paper considers this phenomenon with reference to UK studies from both ends of the generational spectrum. The first questioned how older people keep warm at home during winter and the second examined how young people get rid of no longer wanted possessions. Both found that, though the respondents involved were acting in certain ways that may be deemed comparatively low impact, they were hitherto relatively indifferent to the idea of characterising these actions as such. We outline three ways in which sustainability advocates might respond to the existence of such “inadvertent environmentalists” and consider how they might inspire studies that generate fresh intervention ideas instead of lingering on the dispiriting recognition that people do not often feel able to act for the environment.
    • International perspectives on the effectiveness of geography fieldwork for learning

      Fuller, Ian C.; Edmondson, Sally; France, Derek; Higgitt, David; Ratinen, Ilkka; Massey University ; Liverpool Hope University ; University of Chester ; National University of Singapore ; University of Jyväskylä (Routledge, 2006-03)
      This article discusses assumptions on the effectiveness of fieldwork as a mode of learning in geography. This is approached from an international perspective, both in the review of available evidence, which demonstrates a need for rigorous research into the issue, and in providing preliminary findings of research into the value of fieldwork from universities across three continents.
    • Practitioner perspectives on the use of technology in fieldwork teaching

      Fletcher, Stephen; France, Derek; Moore, Kate; Robinson, Geoff; Bournemouth University ; University of Chester ; University of Leicester ; University of St Andrews (Routledge, 2007-04-25)
      This article discusses the role of C&IT within field courses. The general level of usage of C&IT in the field was established through a national survey of field courses. This was supplemented by an expert group analysis, which focused on the reasons behind the use of C&IT in the field. It was concluded that most use of C&IT in the field is driven by technological rather than pedagogic innovation.
    • A Sustainable Future in the Making? The Maker Movement, the Maker-Habitus and Sustainability

      Collins, Rebecca; University of Chester (Routledge, 2018-04-06)
      Recent years have seen the emergence of what has been termed a new ‘maker movement’. Alternately cast either as an essentially new mode of engagement with the practices and potentialities of making instigated by the development of new technologies, or a (re)turn to the fundamentals and rewards of traditional crafts, opportunities to practice making in an array of forms are increasingly widespread. Whilst there has been some (limited) acknowledgement of the role a (re)valorisation of making might play in a more environmentally sustainable material culture (e.g. Brook 2012), how such connections might be made and supported has remained unexplored. This chapter draws on both theoretical and empirical sources in order to articulate a conceptual ‘maker-habitus’ – an embodied orientation to the material world characterised by an interest in material (re)production. I argue that fundamental to the ‘maker-habitus’ is a particularly acute affordance sensitivity – that is, an ability to identify the potentialities of materials and material things. Recent empirical work is used to illustrate this notion at work and, in turn, to suggest that increasing societal support for the proliferation of such sensibilities might be key to eliciting a more environmentally sustainable everyday material culture.