• April 2010 UK Airspace closure: Experience and impact on the UK’s air-travelling

      Miller, Servel; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2011-04-13)
      Ash emitted from the Eyjafjallajökull Icelandic volcano and which drifted into UK airspace resulted in the airspace being closed between the 14th and 20th of April 2010. The airport closure resulted in over a million travellers being affected and highlighted the shortcomings of airlines, travel agencies and governments to respond adequately to such crisis. In the current (2010) economic climate, where airline and travel companies are declaring themselves bankrupt with increased frequency, it is imperative that passengers do not lose confidence in the industry, which may impact directly on the industry’s continuing economic viability. Understanding passengers’ experiences is crucial to remedying negative experiences and harnessing ‘good practice’ for the advancement of the industry. To gain a better understanding of the crisis and its impact, a questionnaire was administered to members of the UK air-travelling public immediately after the airspace was re-opened. This research highlights the problems faced by passengers throughout the crisis and the way it impacted on their lives and livelihoods. Analysis of the survey results indicates two general themes regarding passengers’ support during the crisis. First, the needs for accommodation support during the crisis, and second, the need for effective, efficient, timely and reliable communication during the crisis, particularly to those stranded overseas. The latter is the dominant theme and the one that caused passengers the most stress, anxiety and inconvenience. Just over 90% of all those surveyed highlighted the failure of airline, travel agencies and/or government to provide timely and appropriate information as the major issue during the airspace closure. The airspace closure also caused adverse health impacts, with seventy-percent of respondents highlighting this as a concern. Although passengers were greatly inconvenienced and found their insurance cover insufficient during the crisis, fifty-six percent indicated that they would not take out additional ash cloud cover, with most citing the risk as too low to warrant it and/or the additional expense too much. Seventy-nine percent of respondents indicated that the crisis had little or no impact on their decision to fly in the future
    • Changes to the dispersive characteristics of soils along an evolutionary slope sequence in the Vera badlands, southeast Spain: Implications for site stabilisation

      Faulkner, Hazel; Alexander, Roy; Wilson, B. R.; University of Middlesex : University of Chester : University of New England, Australia (Elsevier, 2003-01-01)
    • Convergent human and climate forcing of late-Holocene flooding in northwest England

      Schillereff, Daniel; MacDonald, Neil; Hooke, Janet; Welsh, Katharine E.; Piliposian, G.; Croudace, Ian; Chiverrell, Richard; Kings College London; University of Liverpool, University of Liverpool, University of Liverpool, University of Chester, University of Liverpool, University of Southampton (Elsevier, 2019-07-30)
      Concern is growing that climate change may amplify global flood risk but short hydrological data series hamper hazard assessment. Lake sediment reconstructions are capturing a fuller picture of rare, high-magnitude events but the UK has produced few lake palaeoflood records. We report the longest lake-derived flood reconstruction for the UK to date, a 1500-year record from Brotherswater, northwest England. Its catchment is well-suited physiographically to palaeoflood research, but its homogeneous, dark brown sediment matrix precludes visual identification of flood layers. Instead, an outlier detection routine applied to high-resolution particle size measurements showed a >90% match, in stratigraphic sequence, to measured high river flows. Our late-Holocene palaeoflood reconstruction reveals nine multi-decadal periods of more frequent flooding (CE 510-630, 890-960, 990-1080, 1470-1560, 1590-1620, 1650-1710, 1740-1770, 1830-1890 and 1920-2012), and these show a significant association with negative winter North Atlantic Oscillation (wNAO) phasing and some synchrony with solar minima. These flood-rich episodes also overlap with local and regional land-use intensification, which we propose has amplified the flood signal by creating a more efficient catchment sediment conveyor and more rapid hillslope-channel hydrological connectivity. Disentangling anthropogenic and climatic drivers is a challenge but anthropogenic landscape transformation should evidently not be underestimated in palaeoflood reconstructions. Our paper also demonstrates that flood histories can be extracted from the numerous lakes worldwide containing organic-rich, visually homogeneous sediments. This transformative evidence base should lead to more reliable assessments of flood frequency and risks to ecosystems and infrastructure.
    • The digital divide: Patterns, policy and scenarios for connecting the ‘final few’ in rural communities across Great Britain

      Philip, Lorna; Cottrill, Caitlin; Farrington, John; Williams, Fiona; Ashmore, Fiona; University of Aberdeen; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2017-01-17)
      The Internet can bestow significant benefits upon those who use it. The prima facie case for an urban-rural digital divide is widely acknowledged, but detailed accounts of the spatial patterns of digital communications infrastructure are rarely reported. In this paper we present original analysis of data published by the UK telecommunications regulator, Ofcom, and identify and reflect on the entrenched nature of the urban-rural digital divide in Great Britain. Drawing upon illustrative case vignettes we demonstrate the implications of digital exclusion for personal and business lives in rural, and in particular remote rural, areas. The ability of the current UK policy context to effectively address the urban-rural digital divide is reviewed and scenarios for improving digital connectivity amongst the ‘final few’, including community-led broadband, satellite broadband and mobile broadband, are considered. A call is made for digital future proofing in telecommunications policy, without which the already faster urban areas will get ‘faster, fastest’ leaving rural areas behind and an increasingly entrenched urban-rural divide.
    • Fieldwork Going Digital

      Fuller, Ian C.; France, Derek; Massey University, New Zealand; University of Chester, UK (Elsevier, 2014-12-01)
      This chapter provides examples of best practice in teaching physical geography and geomorphology fieldwork in a range of settings from New Zealand and Europe. Firstly we evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating active learning and synthesis opportunities in a tour of North Island geomorphology, using learner-generated video clips summarizing landscape features, processes and management issues. Secondly, we focus on deploying digital video in field experiments within process geomorphology, which introduce students to sophisticated technology and standard field-sampling procedures. Digital video increases engagement and enjoyment involved in data collection and improves understanding of methods employed. Thirdly, we discuss the use of Web 3.0 Technology in field teaching more broadly in physical geography. Here iPads were primarily used to take photographs, video, browse the web, enter raw data and as a tool to aid reflection, through tweets and short videos. The devices facilitated engagement and group interactions on residential fieldwork.This chapter provides examples of best practice in teaching physical geography and geomorphology fieldwork in a range of settings from New Zealand and Europe. Firstly we evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating active learning and synthesis opportunities in a tour of North Island geomorphology, using learner-generated video clips summarizing landscape features, processes and management issues. Secondly, we focus on deploying digital video in field experiments within process geomorphology, which introduce students to sophisticated technology and standard field-sampling procedures. Digital video increases engagement and enjoyment involved in data collection and improves understanding of methods employed. Thirdly, we discuss the use of Web 3.0 Technology in field teaching more broadly in physical geography. Here iPads were primarily used to take photographs, video, browse the web, enter raw data and as a tool to aid reflection, through tweets and short videos. The devices facilitated engagement and group interactions on residential fieldwork.
    • The impact of a major Quaternary river capture on the alluvial sediments of a beheaded river system, the Rio Alias SE Spain

      Maher, Elizabeth; Harvey, Adrian M.; France, Derek; University College Chester ; University of Liverpool ; University College Chester (Elsevier, 2007-02-28)
      This article discusses a major river capture event within the Sorbas Basin (c.70 ka) which created a situation whereby the Rio Alias abruptly lost c. 70% of its drainage area and this led to a significant modification of the fluvial system in both upstream and downstream zones on the capturing stream, and downstream on the beheaded system.
    • The increasing exposure of cities to the effects of volcanic eruptions: A global survey

      Chester, David; Degg, Martin; Duncan, Angus; Guest, John E.; University of Liverpool ; Chester College of Higher Education ; University of Luton ; University College London (Elsevier, 2000-09)
      This article discusses the demographic changes caused by urbanisation and detail the various types of volcanic hazard to which cities are exposed.
    • Innovative Pedagogies

      Hill, jennifer; France, Derek; University of West of England, University of Chester (Elsevier, 2019-12-04)
      We scope eight innovative pedagogies that have the potential to provoke major shifts in teaching, learning, and assessment in geography at the undergraduate level. There are further opportunities for geography educators to embrace newly emerging pedagogies to the positive benefit of students, staff, and the health of the discipline. The next decade of higher education geographical pedagogy might focus less on individual elements of our practice and more on how to integrate latent pedagogies into an effective process for future-facing lifelong learning, which might be achieved by focusing on heutagogy in borderland spaces of learning; bringing together a multiplicity of geography and other disciplinary students over diverse spaces and times to co-construct understanding dialogically, allowing them to determine their own learning needs, and preparing them to be successful citizens in a dynamic and uncertain future.
    • Keeping it in the family: Refocusing household sustainability

      Collins, Rebecca; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2015-01-24)
      Recent research on how best to support the development of pro-environmental behaviours has pointed towards the household as the scale at which interventions might be most effectively targeted. While pro-environmental behaviour research has tended to focus on the actions of adults, almost one-third of UK households also include children and teenagers. Some research has suggested that young people are particularly adept at exerting influence on the ways in which the household as a whole consumes. Yet this influence is not only one-way; parents continue to have direct input into the ways in which their children relate to and interact with the objects of consumption (such as personal possessions) through routine processes including acquisition, use, keeping and ridding. In this paper I draw on qualitative research with British teenagers to highlight how young people and their parents interact when managing household material consumption. I use this discussion to suggest that promoters of sustainability might increase the efficacy of their efforts by engaging households as complex family units, where individual household members’ distinct priorities are linked by shared familial values, and where family-based group identity is used to encourage shared commitment to lower-impact living.
    • On the application of contemporary bulk sediment organic carbon isotope and geochemical datasets for Holocene sea-level reconstruction in NW Europe

      Wilson, Graham P.; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2017-08-02)
      Bulk organic stable carbon isotope (δ13C) and element geochemistry (total organic carbon (TOC) and organic carbon to total nitrogen (Corg/Ntot)) analysis is a developing technique in Holocene relative sea-level (RSL) research. The uptake of this technique in Northern Europe is limited compared to North America, where the common existence of coastal marshes with isotopically distinctive C3 and C4 vegetation associated with well defined inundation tolerance permits the reconstruction of RSL in the sediment record. In Northern Europe, the reduced range in δ13C values between organic matter sources in C3 estuaries can make the identification of elevation-dependent environments in the Holocene sediment record challenging and this is compounded by the potential for post-depositional alteration in bulk δ13C values. The use of contemporary regional δ13C, C/N and TOC datasets representing the range of physiographic conditions commonly encountered in coastal wetland sediment sequences opens up the potential of using absolute values of sediment geochemistry to infer depositional environments and associated reference water levels. In this paper, the application of contemporary bulk organic δ13C, C/N and TOC to reconstruct Holocene RSL is further explored. An extended contemporary regional geochemical dataset of published δ13C, C/N and TOC observations (n=142) from tidal-dominated C3 wetland deposits (representing tidal flat, saltmarsh, reedswamp and fen carr environments) in temperate NW Europe is compiled, and procedures implemented to correct for the 13C Suess effect on contemporary δ13C are detailed. Partitioning around medoids analysis identifies two distinctive geochemical groups in the NW European dataset, with tidal flat / saltmarsh and reedswamp / fen carr environments exhibiting characteristically different sediment δ13C, C/N and TOC values. A logistic regression model is developed from the NW European dataset in order to objectively identify in the sediment record geochemical groups and, more importantly, group transitions, thus allowing the altitude of reference water levels to be determined. The application of this method in RSL research is demonstrated using the Holocene sediments of the Mersey Estuary (UK), in which δ13C, C/N and TOC variability is typical of that encountered in Holocene sediments from C3 coastal wetlands in NW Europe. Group membership was predicted with high probability in the depositional contexts studied and the accuracy of group prediction is verified by microfossil evidence.The method presented facilitates the application of δ13C, C/N and TOC analysis in RSL reconstruction studies in C3 vegetated wetlands throughout temperate NW Europe.
    • Persistent millennial-scale climate variability in Southern Europe during Marine Isotope Stage 6

      WILSON, GRAHAM PAUL; FROGLEY, MICHAEL; HUGHES, PHILIP; ROUCOUX, KATHERINE; MARGARI, VASILIKI; JONES, TIM; LENG, MELANIE; TZEDAKIS, POLYCHRONIS; University of Chester; University College London (Elsevier, 2020-11-11)
      Exploring the mode and tempo of millennial-scale climate variability under evolving boundary conditions can provide insights into tipping points in different parts of the Earth system, and can facilitate a more detailed understanding of climate teleconnections and phase relationships between different Earth system components. Here we use fossil diatom and stable carbon and oxygen isotope analysis of lake sediment deposits (core I-284) from the Ioannina basin, NW Greece, to explore in further detail millennial-scale climate instability in southern Europe during Marine Isotope Stage 6 (MIS 6; ca. 185‒130 ka). This interval correlates with the Vlasian Stage in Greece and the Late Saalian Substage in northern Europe, which were both characterised by extensive glaciations. The new dataset resolves at least 18 discrete warmer / wetter intervals, many of which were associated with strong Asian Monsoon events and North Atlantic interstadials. A number of cooler / drier intervals are also identified in the I-284 record, which are typically associated with weaker Asian Monsoon events and North Atlantic stadials, consistent with a variable Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Unlike the subdued changes in tree populations that are observed at Ioannina during mid-to-late MIS 6, the diatom record contains frequent high-amplitude oscillations in species assemblages, pointing to its sensitivity at a time when the lake system must have been close to environmental thresholds. Millennial-scale variability in diatom species assemblages continues into late MIS 6 at Ioannina, contributing important evidence for an emerging picture of frequent and persistent climate instability even at times of high global ice volume.
    • Remote rural home based businesses and digital inequalities: Understanding needs and expectations in a digitally underserved community

      Philip, Lorna; Williams, Fiona; University of Aberdeen; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2018-10-09)
      The digital economy offers home based micro-businesses in rural areas many advantages but stubborn social, economic and territorial digital divides continue to create challenges for this sector of the rural economy. Complex digital inequalities are illustrated in our case studies of the digital behaviour and Internet experiences of those running micro, home based businesses in a remote, digitally underserved rural community before, during and after the deployment of broadband technology. Findings draw attention to the role and importance of fit-for-purpose broadband in promoting digital inclusion for individuals, households and small, home based businesses: in a fast changing digital national and global economy remote rural home based micro-businesses are at risk of being left behind.
    • Resilience through flood memory– a comparison of the role of insurance and experience in flood resilience for households and businesses in England.

      Bhattacharya Mis, Namrata; Lamond, Jessica; University of Chester; University of West of England
      Resilience to flooding is influenced by adaptations or behavior that address risk reduction at all stages of the disaster cycle. This includes: physical adaptation of buildings to limit damage; individual preparedness and business continuity planning; and provision of resources for reinstatement through insurance or recovery grants. In the UK implementation of such strategies lie mainly with private property owner and their private insurer while government policy promotes greater uptake by these actors as part of an integrated strategy. In the context of increased flood events the provision of affordable insurance has been increasingly challenging and in 2016 a new insurance arrangement (Flood Re) was put in place to support transition to affordable market based insurance. However, Flood Re is specific to residential property and excludes many categories of property previously guaranteed coverage including small businesses. The research used a survey of frequently flooded locations in England to explore the different experiences and behaviors of households and businesses at risk from flooding with respect to insurance and recovery in this evolving scenario. The results show distinct differences between households and businesses that could point to greater opportunities for enhancing resilience if policy and practice recognized those differences.