• Ability of students to recognize the relationship between using mobile apps for learning during fieldwork and the development of graduate attributes

      France, Derek; Powell, Victoria; Mauchline, Alice; Welsh, Katharine E.; Park, Julian R.; Whalley, W. Brian; Rewhorn, Sonja; University of Chester; University of Reading; University of Sheffield (Taylor & Francis, 2016-05-08)
      The increasing importance of employability in Higher Education curricula and the prevalence of using mobile devices for field-based learning, prompted an investigation into student awareness of the relationship between the use of mobile apps for learning and the development of graduate attributes (and the link to employability). The results from post-fieldwork focus groups from four field courses indicated that students could make clear links between the use of a variety of mobile apps and graduate attribute development. The study suggests a number of mobile apps can align simultaneously with more than one graduate attribute. Furthermore, prior experience and the context of use can influence students’ perceptions of an app and its link with different graduate attributes
    • Developing ethical geography students? The impact and effectiveness of a tutorial based approach

      Healey, Ruth L.; Ribchester, Chris; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2016-02-17)
      This paper explores the effectiveness of a tutorial based approach in supporting the development of geography undergraduates’ ethical thinking. It was found that overall the intervention had a statistically significant impact on students’ ethical thinking scores as assessed using Clarkeburn et al.’s (2003) Meta-Ethical Questionnaire (MEQ). The initiative led to a convergence of scores, having a bigger impact on those who had a relatively low score prior to the intervention. Interestingly the approach had the biggest impact on students who self-identified as physical geographers. Unlike some previous research there was little evidence of difference between male and female students.
    • Do educators realise the value of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) in fieldwork learning?

      Clark, Katherine; Welsh, Katharine; Mauchline, Alice; France, Derek; Whalley, Brian; Park, Julian; University of Chester, University of Reading, University of Sheffield
      This paper explores the benefits, barriers and challenges of BYOD (Bring Your Own [mobile] Device) in fieldwork teaching through the views of Higher Education practitioners who have and have not used BYOD in fieldwork. While the use of BYOD has been explored within classroom settings, there are few studies on the use and impact on BYOD in fieldwork., This study investigated the educational benefits of BYOD and the barriers and challenges associated with BYOD in the field. Students were willing to use their own devices in the field and were engaged through the use of BYOD. Practitioners noted various benefits to using BYOD, including student engagement and familiarity with their own devices, potentially increasing time available in the field. Practitioners also highlighted a number of challenges and potential challenges with BYOD including supporting a range of devices, incompatibility and the potential for inequality. This paper also explores the use of mobile technology in fieldwork through the SAMR (Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, Redefinition) model and discusses the potential for BYOD to change practice.
    • Does digital video enhance student learning in field-based experiments and develop graduate attributes beyond the classroom?

      Fuller, Ian C.; France, Derek; Massey University; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2016-02-09)
      The connection between fieldwork and development of graduate attributes is explored in this paper. Digital technologies present opportunities to potentially enhance the learning experience of students undertaking fieldwork, and develop core digital attributes and competencies required by Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and employers. This paper reports the success of adopting digital video capture in technology-rich field experiments that form part of final year undergraduate courses in Physical Geography at an HEI in New Zealand. Student perceptions were obtained via a range of approaches. Results suggest that deployment of digital video reinforces student learning and connects with core graduate attributes.
    • E-learning for geography's teaching and learning spaces

      Lynch, Kenneth; Bednarz, Robert S.; Boxall, James; Chalmers, Lex; France, Derek; Kesby, Julie; University of Gloucestershire ; Texas A&M University ; Dalhousie University ; University of Waikato ; University of Chester ; University of New South Wales (Routledge, 2008-01)
      This article discusses e-learning from a wide range of teaching and learning contexts. The authors promote the idea that considering best practice with reference to educational technology will increase the versatility of teaching geography in higher education.
    • Embedding research-based learning early in the undergraduate geography curriculum

      Walkington, Helen; Griffin, Amy L.; Keys-Mathews, Lisa; Metoyer, Sandra K.; Miller, Wendy E.; Baker, Richard; France, Derek; Oxford Brookes University ; University of New South Wales ; University of North Alabama ; Texas A&M University ; State University of New York College at Cortland ; The Australian National University ; University of Chester (Routledge, 2011-05-16)
      This article discusses the rationale for embedding research and enquiry skills early in the undergraduate geography curriculum and for making these skills explicit to students. A survey of 52 international geography faculty identified critical thinking, framing research questions, reflectivity and creativity as the most challenging research skills to teach early in the undergraduate curriculum.
    • Fieldwork@40: fieldwork in geography higher education

      France, Derek; Haigh, Martin; University of Chester; Oxford Brookes University (Taylor & Francis, 2018-09-09)
      Fieldwork is the most powerful learning invitation in the toolkit of Geographical Education. This review of papers in The Journal of Geography in Higher Education (JGHE) suggests seven modes in the development of fieldwork. These are arrayed as a kind of historical, perhaps evolutionary, sequence but most remain current in Geography fieldwork practice. At the far end (1960s) of the sequence are didactic modes that are teacher centred and use the field as an adjunct to the classroom, in the middle (1990s) are modes that involve active learning and focus on the development of students as investigators and at the near end (2010s) are those that centred on the field study area and its qualities, that involve concern about the ethics of student engagement and that employ blended learning technologies. The review charts the JGHE’s gradual shift away from its original, almost exclusively, UK-focus toward something rather more international and inclusive. Fieldwork is where Geographers learn “from doing” Geography to “do” Geography. Its special attributes include providing experiential, sometimes transformative, learning through the immersion of the learner in the field experience. In 40 years, JGHE has helped Geography Fieldwork move from the margins of the curriculum to its current place at its core.
    • Geotagging photographs in student fieldwork

      Welsh, Katharine E.; France, Derek; Whalley, W. Brian; Park, Julian R.; University of Chester ; University of Chester ; University of Sheffield ; University of Reading (Routledge, 2012-01-23)
      This article provides guidance for staff and students on the potential educational benefits, limitations and applications of geotagging photographs.
    • Graduate attributes: implications for higher education practice and policy: Introduction

      Hill, Jennifer; Walkington, Helen; France, Derek; University of the West of England; Oxford Brookes University; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2016-04-13)
      This publication is an introduction to a collection or a symposium of seven papers themed papers around graduates attributes. They originate from a series of conference sessions convened and chaired by the authors in 2013 at two events: the Royal Geographical Society (with Institute of British Geographers) Annual International Conference held in London, UK, and the Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting held in Los Angeles, USA
    • How to persuade and influence people: The art of effective geographical debate

      Healey, Ruth; Leatham, Chloe; University of Chester (Routledge, 2021-05-27)
      This article supports students to prepare to participate in a debate. We consider thorough preparation as the foundation for effective debate. Here we provide guidance on one approach to preparing as effectively as possible. We outline this before considering three key elements to this method of preparation: 1) substance: your knowledge and understanding of the debate topic; 2) style: how to present your points clearly and succinctly; and 3) persuasion: how through both substance and style you effectively persuade people of your argument. We conclude by summarising the key points raised in this guide and identifying how they apply to other assignment contexts. The discussion that follows uses the debate topic ‘Should an additional charge be applied to all single-use plastics?’ to demonstrate the approaches we suggest.
    • How to produce a digital story

      France, Derek; Wakefield, Kelly; University of Chester ; Loughborough University (Routledge, 2011-11)
      This article discusses how digital stories (collection of still images, audio and video) can be used to assess geography undergraduates and offers guidance to students on how to create the best digital stories for assessment.
    • Inclusive partnership: Enhancing student engagement in geography

      Moore-Cherry, Niamh; Healey, Ruth L.; Andrews, Will; Nicholson, Dawn T.; University College Dublin ; University of Chester ; Aberystwyth University ; Manchester Metropolitan University (2015-08-20)
      Partnership is currently the focus of much work within higher education (HEA, 2014; Healey et al., 2014; Cook-Sather et al., 2014) and advocated as an important process to address a range of higher education goals. In this paper, we propose the term inclusive partnership to conceptualise a non-selective staff-student relationship.
    • International perspectives on the effectiveness of geography fieldwork for learning

      Fuller, Ian C.; Edmondson, Sally; France, Derek; Higgitt, David; Ratinen, Ilkka; Massey University ; Liverpool Hope University ; University of Chester ; National University of Singapore ; University of Jyväskylä (Routledge, 2006-03)
      This article discusses assumptions on the effectiveness of fieldwork as a mode of learning in geography. This is approached from an international perspective, both in the review of available evidence, which demonstrates a need for rigorous research into the issue, and in providing preliminary findings of research into the value of fieldwork from universities across three continents.
    • ‘None of Us Sets Out To Hurt People’: The Ethical Geographer and Geography Curricula in Higher Education

      Boyd, William (Bill) E.; Healey, Ruth L.; Hardwick, Susan W.; Haigh, Martin; Klein, Phil; Doran, Bruce; Trafford, Julie; Bradbeer, John; Southern Cross University; University of Sheffield; University of Oregon; Oxford Brookes University; University of North Colorado; Australian National University; University of Auckland; University of Portsmouth (Taylor & Francis, 2008-01-22)
      This paper examines ethics in learning and teaching geography in higher education. It proposes a pathway towards curriculum and pedagogy that better incorporates ethics in university geography education. By focusing on the central but problematic relationships between (i) teaching and learning on the one hand and research on the other, and (ii) ethics and geography curricula, the authors’ reflections illustrate how ethics may be better recognized within those curricula. They discuss issues affecting teaching and learning about ethics in geography, and through identification of a range of examples identify ways to enhance the integration of ethical issues into university geography curricula.
    • Pedagogic partnership in higher education: encountering emotion in learning and enhancing student wellbeing

      Hill, Jennifer; Healey, Ruth L.; West, Harry; Dery, Chantal; University of the West of England; University of Chester; University of the West of England; Université du Québec en Outaouais (Taylor & Francis, 2019-09-17)
      Despite emotion being recognised as fundamental to learning, the affective aspects of learning have often been side-lined in higher education. In the context of rising student wellbeing challenges, exploring ways of supporting students and their emotions in learning is increasingly significant. Pedagogic partnerships have the potential to help students to recognise and work with their emotions in their learning in a positive manner. As such, pedagogic partnerships offer opportunities to promote resilience and enhance student wellbeing. In this paper, we develop partnership research in three ways by: 1) considering the ways in which pedagogic partnership may support students to encounter emotions and empower them to develop resilience, leading to positive wellbeing; 2) exploring how this process might be achieved in the disciplinary context of geography; and 3) developing an evidence-based model to summarise the potential effect of pedagogic partnership in enhancing student wellbeing. We draw upon two case studies of student-faculty and student-student pedagogic partnership within geography curricula in order to evidence that emotional awareness in learning comes through the joys and struggles of working in partnership. We argue that pedagogic partnership may be developed to support the wellbeing of modern-day higher education communities.
    • Performing Academic Practice: Using the Master Class to Build Postgraduate Discursive Competences

      Bærenholdt, Jorgen O.; Gregson, Nicky; Everts, Jonathan; Granås, Brynhild; Healey, Ruth L.; Roskilde University; University of Sheffield; University of Sheffield; University of Tromso; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2010-04-27)
      How can we find ways of training PhD students in academic practices, while reflexively analysing how academic practices are performed? The paper’s answer to this question is based on evaluations from a British–Nordic master class. The paper discusses how master classes can be used to train the discursive skills required for academic discussion, commenting and reporting. Methods used in the master class are: performing and creative arts pedagogical exercises, the use of written provocations to elicit short papers, discussion group exercises, and training in reporting and in panel discussion facilitated by a meta-panel discussion. The authors argue that master classes have the potential to further develop advanced-level PhD training, especially through their emphasis on reflexive engagement in the performance of key academic skills.
    • The power of debate: Reflections on the potential of debates for engaging students in critical thinking about controversial geographical topics

      Healey, Ruth L. (2012-01-23)
      This article reflects on the potential for teaching through debate in geography. The arguments are illustrated through a debate about whether asylum seekers should be allowed to work in the UK.
    • Practitioner perspectives on the use of technology in fieldwork teaching

      Fletcher, Stephen; France, Derek; Moore, Kate; Robinson, Geoff; Bournemouth University ; University of Chester ; University of Leicester ; University of St Andrews (Routledge, 2007-04-25)
      This article discusses the role of C&IT within field courses. The general level of usage of C&IT in the field was established through a national survey of field courses. This was supplemented by an expert group analysis, which focused on the reasons behind the use of C&IT in the field. It was concluded that most use of C&IT in the field is driven by technological rather than pedagogic innovation.
    • Producing websites for assessment: A case study from a Level 1 fieldwork module

      France, Derek; Ribchester, Chris; University College Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2004-03)
      This article discusses a level 1 module assessment that requires students to write up a field-based research project as a functioning website. Student feedback and practical issues are commented upon
    • Professional development in teaching and learning for early career academic geographers: Contexts, practices and tensions

      Vajoczki, Susan; Biegas, Tamara C.; Crenshaw, Melody; Healey, Ruth L.; Osayomi, Tolulope; Bradford, Michael; Monk, Janice; McMaster University; Texas State University; Northwest Vista College; University of Chester; University of Ibadan; University of Manchester; University of Arizona (Taylor & Francis, 2011-05-16)
      This paper provides a review of the practices and tensions informing approaches to professional development for early career academic geographers who are teaching in higher education. We offer examples from Britain, Canada, Nigeria and the USA. The tensions include: institutional and departmental cultures; models that offer generic and discipline-specific approaches; the credibility of alternative settings for professional development in teaching and learning; the valuing of professional development and of teaching in academic systems of reward and recognition; and the challenges of balancing professional and personal life. We summarize concepts of good practice and suggest opportunities for future research.