• Developing ethical geography students? The impact and effectiveness of a tutorial based approach

      Healey, Ruth L.; Ribchester, Chris; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2016-02-17)
      This paper explores the effectiveness of a tutorial based approach in supporting the development of geography undergraduates’ ethical thinking. It was found that overall the intervention had a statistically significant impact on students’ ethical thinking scores as assessed using Clarkeburn et al.’s (2003) Meta-Ethical Questionnaire (MEQ). The initiative led to a convergence of scores, having a bigger impact on those who had a relatively low score prior to the intervention. Interestingly the approach had the biggest impact on students who self-identified as physical geographers. Unlike some previous research there was little evidence of difference between male and female students.
    • Extra-curricular education for sustainable development (ESD) interventions in UK universities

      Lipscombe, Bryan P.; Burek, Cynthia V.; Potter, Jacqueline; Ribchester, Chris; Degg, Martin; University of Chester (Environmental Education Association of South Africa, 2007)
    • An overview of extra-curricular education for sustainable development (ESD) interventions in UK universities

      Lipscombe, Bryan P.; Burek, Cynthia V.; Potter, Jacqueline; Ribchester, Chris; Degg, Martin; University of Chester (Emerald, 2008-07-11)
      This article explores the extent and type of extra-curricular education for sustainable development-related practice in UK universities and to record opinions about the utility of such work, through a postal questionnaire survey of all UK universities was undertaken in 2006.
    • Pedagogies for developing undergraduate ethical thinking within geography

      Healey, Ruth L.; Ribchester, Chris; University of Chester; University of Manchester
      This chapter initially defines the goals of teaching ethics to geography undergraduates, before outlining what a holistic programme approach might look like. This includes identification of seven different contexts, inside and outside the curriculum, when ethical issues might be encountered by geography students; a list which may act as a useful guide for tutors considering teaching ethics for the first time. Whatever specific approaches to teaching ethics are adopted, the next section emphasizes the value of giving students the opportunity to recognize, review, and respond to topics and experiences. Within this context, the value of pursuing non-didactic teaching approaches, the importance of providing a consistent theoretical framework for reviewing ethical problems, and the likely impact of encouraging ongoing personal reflection are discussed. These pedagogic strategies are illustrated further through a case study detailing engagement with ethical issues within small group tutorial discussions using tutor- and student-authored scenarios.
    • Podcasting: A tool for enhancing assessment feedback?

      Ribchester, Chris; France, Derek; Wheeler, Anne (University of Chester, 2007-09-14)
      This presentation discusses how audio feedback to student assignments have been given by podcast at the University of Chester for some Geography modules. There is an overview of the process of producing the podcast and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of giving feedback in this form.
    • Podcasts and feedback

      France, Derek; Ribchester, Chris; University of Chester (Open University Press, 2008-07-01)
      This book chapter discusses the potential for using podcasts to enhance feedback to students.
    • Producing websites for assessment: A case study from a Level 1 fieldwork module

      France, Derek; Ribchester, Chris; University College Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2004-03)
      This article discusses a level 1 module assessment that requires students to write up a field-based research project as a functioning website. Student feedback and practical issues are commented upon
    • Realism, reflection and responsibility: The challenge of writing effective scenarios to support the development of ethical thinking skills

      Ribchester, Chris; Healey, Ruth L.; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2017-08-07)
      Universities are paying increased attention to how they might support the ethical development of their students as one of a range of graduate attributes that will enable them to negotiate increasingly complex professional, civic and personal futures. Scenario-based learning (SBL) is a longstanding strategy used in ethical teaching and this paper describes and evaluates a version of this approach as applied to a second year undergraduate tutorials module. A quantitative assessment of the development of students’ ethical sensitivity over the course of two deliveries of the module shows an uneven impact but also some encouraging trends. A detailed qualitative analysis of how students responded to each scenario identifies five factors that appear to precipitate more in-depth reflection on ethical problems, and these are presented as useful points of guidance for teachers writing ethical scenarios for the first time or for those aiming to hone their existing practice. These factors include the challenge of devising circumstances which appear realistic and plausible to contemporary undergraduate students, constructing scenarios which encourage readers to reflect on and test their personal values, and portraying events which push students to intervene proactively and so taking individual responsibility for their decisions and actions.