• Ability of students to recognize the relationship between using mobile apps for learning during fieldwork and the development of graduate attributes

      France, Derek; Powell, Victoria; Mauchline, Alice; Welsh, Katharine E.; Park, Julian R.; Whalley, W. Brian; Rewhorn, Sonja; University of Chester; University of Reading; University of Sheffield (Taylor & Francis, 2016-05-08)
      The increasing importance of employability in Higher Education curricula and the prevalence of using mobile devices for field-based learning, prompted an investigation into student awareness of the relationship between the use of mobile apps for learning and the development of graduate attributes (and the link to employability). The results from post-fieldwork focus groups from four field courses indicated that students could make clear links between the use of a variety of mobile apps and graduate attribute development. The study suggests a number of mobile apps can align simultaneously with more than one graduate attribute. Furthermore, prior experience and the context of use can influence students’ perceptions of an app and its link with different graduate attributes
    • Enhancing Fieldwork Learning Using Mobile Technologies

      France, Derek; Whalley, W. Brian; Mauchline, Alice; Powell, Victoria; Welsh, Katharine E.; Lerczak, Alex; Park, Julian R.; Bednarz, Robert S.; University of Chester; University of Reading and Texas A&M University (Springer, 2015-10-26)
      This book aims to share and develop pedagogic fieldwork practice of practitioners through the applications of new digital technologies. The book showcases 29 case studies. Fieldwork is a core element of many Bioscience, Geography, Geology, Earth & Environmental Science degree courses. Fieldwork can provide opportunities for experiential learning and research-led teaching in a ‘real-world’ setting. Teaching and learning on fieldwork can be enhanced through the use of digital technologies; tablets provide opportunities to develop novel approaches to fieldwork pedagogy that neither students nor tutors envisaged possible through traditional means.
    • Student perceptions of iPads as mobile learning devices for fieldwork

      Welsh, Katharine E.; Mauchline, Alice; Powell, Victoria; France, Derek; Park, Julian R.; Whalley, W. Brian; University of Chester (2015-09-01)
      This paper reports findings from six field courses about student’s perceptions of iPads as mobile learning devices for fieldwork. Data were collected through surveys and focus groups. The key findings suggest that the multi-tool nature of the iPads and their portability were the main strengths. Students had some concerns over the safety of the iPads in adverse weather and rugged environments, though most of these concerns were eliminated after using the devices with protective cases. Reduced connectivity was found to be one of the main challenges for mobile learning. Finally, students and practitioners views of why they used the mobile devices for fieldwork did not align.
    • Would Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) be welcomed by undergraduate students to support their learning during fieldwork?

      Welsh, Katharine E.; Mauchline, Alice; France, Derek; Powell, Victoria; Whalley, W. Brian; Park, Julian R.; University of Chester; University of Reading; University of Sheffield (Taylor & Francis, 2018-02-15)
      This paper reports student perceptions of the benefits and challenges of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) in a fieldwork context. Student perceptions from six field courses across two institutions have been gathered using questionnaires and focus groups. Whilst a number of studies have focused on BYOD in a classroom context, little research has been undertaken about BYOD in a fieldwork context. The key findings suggest that around one fifth of students were not willing to use their own device during fieldwork citing loss or damage as the main reason. This key challenge is different to that which are found in a classroom which generally focus on network security, connectivity etc. The findings also suggest that some students believe that BYOD can have a negative impact on group work. There is a misalignment here between student and practitioner thinking with previous literature which suggests that practitioners believe BYOD and smart devices can enhance group work. The one key challenge which is found regardless of learning environment is inequality between those who have a device and those who do not.