• Ability of students to recognize the relationship between using mobile apps for learning during fieldwork and the development of graduate attributes

      France, Derek; Powell, Victoria; Mauchline, Alice; Welsh, Katharine E.; Park, Julian R.; Whalley, W. Brian; Rewhorn, Sonja; University of Chester; University of Reading; University of Sheffield (Taylor & Francis, 2016-05-08)
      The increasing importance of employability in Higher Education curricula and the prevalence of using mobile devices for field-based learning, prompted an investigation into student awareness of the relationship between the use of mobile apps for learning and the development of graduate attributes (and the link to employability). The results from post-fieldwork focus groups from four field courses indicated that students could make clear links between the use of a variety of mobile apps and graduate attribute development. The study suggests a number of mobile apps can align simultaneously with more than one graduate attribute. Furthermore, prior experience and the context of use can influence students’ perceptions of an app and its link with different graduate attributes
    • Authentic learning through place-based education

      France, Derek; Mauchline, Alice; Whalley, Brian; Doolan, Martina; Bilham, Tim; University of Chester, University of Reading, University of Sheffield, University of Hertfordshire (UCL IOE Press, 2019-07-15)
      This chapter continues our exploration of the importance of space and place in facilitating the creation of authentic learning opportunities.
    • By any other name? The impacts of differing assumptions, expectations and misconceptions in bringing about resistance to student-staff ‘partnership’

      Healey, Ruth L.; Lerczak, Alex; Welsh, Katharine E.; France, Derek; University of Chester (McMaster University, 2019-05-07)
      Most of the existing literature on student-staff partnership explores the experiences of people who are keen to be involved and who have already bought into the ethos of students as partners. We explore the challenges of conducting student-staff partnership in the context of resistance. Specifically, we focus on the interpretations of ‘partnership’ by students and staff who were attempting to work in partnership for the first time. The views of the participants were captured during a six-month project in which four undergraduate students were employed to work with eight academics to re-design the second-year undergraduate curriculum on one programme. Notwithstanding an introductory briefing and on-going support, some participants showed indications of resistance. Our findings suggest that different perspectives on ‘partnership’ influenced participants’ experiences. We argue that assumptions and misconceptions around the terminology used to describe ‘students as partners’ practice may hinder the process itself, as some people may not ‘buy-in’ to the practice. However, despite the challenges of this project, the experience of being involved has led to reduced resistance and emerging partnership practices throughout the department.
    • Developing a Web 2.0 technology for hazard response simulation

      Miller, Servel; France, Derek; University of Chester (Higher Education Academy, 2012)
      Students studying disaster/hazard management in UK Higher Education institutions (HEi's) traditionally focus on hazard mapping and process analysis, but have limited opportunities to develop their risk communication skills which are required during emergency response situations. These skills are vital for the real world and employment. Opportunities to develop risk communication skills are not readily available to students during their studies as employers are reluctant to offer placements due to legal barriers. Therefore, universities have to develop tools to provide students with this vital ‘real-world’ experience. Over the last two years, the department of Geography & Development Studies at the University of Chester has begun to explore and evaluate the role of the Web 2.0 tool, Yammer (microblogging/communication tool) for natural hazard (volcano) simulation exercises. This paper highlights the continuing development of the natural hazard simulation exercise through input from external emergency/contingency practitioners locally and internationally to enhance its usability. Input from practitioners has resulted in the adaptation of the tool to flooding hazard emergency response and to other geographically based scenarios (e.g. crime analysis). The input from professionals in the field has enhanced the quality of the exercise/tool as well as providing students with vital employability skills currently used in the workplace of hazard management. Feedback from students highlighted their feeling of a ‘real-life’ pressure situation in which ‘real-time’ decisions have to be made in response to a rapidly changing environment. At the same time they indicated that their experience was stimulating, fun, innovative and enabled networking and interactive opportunities between tutors and students. The development of the Web 2.0 simulation tool through contributions from practitioners and an assessment as to whether the use of such technologies enhances student-learning experience is the focus of this paper.
    • Developing active personal learning environments on smart mobile devices.

      Whalley, Brian; France, Derek; Park, Julian; mauchline, Alice; Welsh, Katharine E.; University of Sheffield, University of Chester, University of Reading (Springer, 2019-10-10)
      ‘Tablets’ and other 'smart' devices (such as iPads and iPhones)have established themselves as a significant part of mobile technologies used in mobile (m-)learning. Smart devices such as iPads and the Apple Watch not only provide many apps that can be used for a variety of educational purposes; they also allow communication between students and tutors and with the world at large via social media. We argue that 'smart' mobile devices enable personalized learning by adjusting to the educational needs of individuals. We refer to Salmon's quadrat diagram to suggest where using mobile technologies should be of benefit to revising our views of pedagogy, making it much more responsive to students' needs in education as well as the world in general. Smart mobile devices now contain computing power to allow voice and face recognition, augmented reality and machine learning to make them intelligent enough to act as tutors for individual students and adjust and respond accordingly. To take advantage of these facilities on mobile devices, pedagogy must change from an institution-centred to a student-tutor-device focus. This is best done via 'active learning' and incorporating cognitive awareness into an educational operating system that can develop with the owner.
    • Development of Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication (CERC) activities and an Evaluation of their Impact on Learning: Geoscience students’ perceptions,

      Miller, Servel; France, Derek; Welsh, Katharine E.; University of Chester (National Committee of Geography of Belgium, Société Royale Belge de Géographie, 2015)
      Recently, the recognition of Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication (CERC) tools in natural hazard management and disaster reduction has gained prominence. A successful CERC will ensure the relevant stakeholders are effective communicating with each other. This requires a clear plan and set of principles that enables the stakeholders to function effectively in a crisis. Students hoping to work in the emergency and natural hazard management field need to develop these skills. This paper outlines the development of a range of risk communicating activities including simulation exercises for undergraduate Geoscience students. Progress in the development of the students risk communication skill through the series of activities is tracked and evaluated. Results indicate that 87% of the students perceived their risk communication skills were good or excellent after undertaking the exercises compared to 26% before. This paper also evaluates the impact of the activities and if they motivated them to learn more about the subject as a whole. Students generally indicated that the exercises motivated them to learn more about natural hazard management and they felt that they have become better risk communicators. They also indicate that they gained a more in-depth understanding of the requirements of effective and timely communications should they need to develop a CERC strategy during a crisis.
    • Do educators realise the value of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) in fieldwork learning?

      Clark, Katherine; Welsh, Katharine; Mauchline, Alice; France, Derek; Whalley, Brian; Park, Julian; University of Chester, University of Reading, University of Sheffield
      This paper explores the benefits, barriers and challenges of BYOD (Bring Your Own [mobile] Device) in fieldwork teaching through the views of Higher Education practitioners who have and have not used BYOD in fieldwork. While the use of BYOD has been explored within classroom settings, there are few studies on the use and impact on BYOD in fieldwork., This study investigated the educational benefits of BYOD and the barriers and challenges associated with BYOD in the field. Students were willing to use their own devices in the field and were engaged through the use of BYOD. Practitioners noted various benefits to using BYOD, including student engagement and familiarity with their own devices, potentially increasing time available in the field. Practitioners also highlighted a number of challenges and potential challenges with BYOD including supporting a range of devices, incompatibility and the potential for inequality. This paper also explores the use of mobile technology in fieldwork through the SAMR (Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, Redefinition) model and discusses the potential for BYOD to change practice.
    • Does digital video enhance student learning in field-based experiments and develop graduate attributes beyond the classroom?

      Fuller, Ian C.; France, Derek; Massey University; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2016-02-09)
      The connection between fieldwork and development of graduate attributes is explored in this paper. Digital technologies present opportunities to potentially enhance the learning experience of students undertaking fieldwork, and develop core digital attributes and competencies required by Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and employers. This paper reports the success of adopting digital video capture in technology-rich field experiments that form part of final year undergraduate courses in Physical Geography at an HEI in New Zealand. Student perceptions were obtained via a range of approaches. Results suggest that deployment of digital video reinforces student learning and connects with core graduate attributes.
    • E-learning for geography's teaching and learning spaces

      Lynch, Kenneth; Bednarz, Robert S.; Boxall, James; Chalmers, Lex; France, Derek; Kesby, Julie; University of Gloucestershire ; Texas A&M University ; Dalhousie University ; University of Waikato ; University of Chester ; University of New South Wales (Routledge, 2008-01)
      This article discusses e-learning from a wide range of teaching and learning contexts. The authors promote the idea that considering best practice with reference to educational technology will increase the versatility of teaching geography in higher education.
    • Embedding research-based learning early in the undergraduate geography curriculum

      Walkington, Helen; Griffin, Amy L.; Keys-Mathews, Lisa; Metoyer, Sandra K.; Miller, Wendy E.; Baker, Richard; France, Derek; Oxford Brookes University ; University of New South Wales ; University of North Alabama ; Texas A&M University ; State University of New York College at Cortland ; The Australian National University ; University of Chester (Routledge, 2011-05-16)
      This article discusses the rationale for embedding research and enquiry skills early in the undergraduate geography curriculum and for making these skills explicit to students. A survey of 52 international geography faculty identified critical thinking, framing research questions, reflectivity and creativity as the most challenging research skills to teach early in the undergraduate curriculum.
    • Enhancing Fieldwork Learning Using Mobile Technologies

      France, Derek; Whalley, W. Brian; Mauchline, Alice; Powell, Victoria; Welsh, Katharine E.; Lerczak, Alex; Park, Julian R.; Bednarz, Robert S.; University of Chester; University of Reading and Texas A&M University (Springer, 2015-10-26)
      This book aims to share and develop pedagogic fieldwork practice of practitioners through the applications of new digital technologies. The book showcases 29 case studies. Fieldwork is a core element of many Bioscience, Geography, Geology, Earth & Environmental Science degree courses. Fieldwork can provide opportunities for experiential learning and research-led teaching in a ‘real-world’ setting. Teaching and learning on fieldwork can be enhanced through the use of digital technologies; tablets provide opportunities to develop novel approaches to fieldwork pedagogy that neither students nor tutors envisaged possible through traditional means.
    • Every Student use of iPads: A Vade Mecum for Students' Active Learning

      Whalley, W. Brian; France, Derek; Mauchline, Alice; Welsh, Katharine E.; Park, Julian R.; University of Sheffield, University of Chester, University of Reading (Cambridge Scholars, 2017-01-01)
      The iPad has evolved into a very capable computer with high processor power, enhanced screen resolution, and good battery life. However, this capability is still largely untapped in higher education by students or staff where there is still reliance on a Victorian higher educational system; that is, content delivery by lectures and assessment by examination. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are, mostly, a modernisation of such content delivery. However, active learning , coupled with increased availability of cloud services and iPads/smartphones, provides opportunities for students to use practical mobile devices anywhere. Such ubiquity allows tutors to promote active learning in any location, even in the lecture theatre. We examine some of the practicalities and pedagogy behind this trend and suggest ways in which students’ educational experiences are enhanced via active learning with iPads, whether cloud linked or not. Involved, active learning promotes digital information and literacy skills into the curriculum as well as integrates knowledge bases via an Internet of Everything. Moreover, employability skills can be incorporated into the learning experiences and the personalisation of iPads can accommodate the needs of students with mobility and specific difficulties. Tutors seem reluctant to use iPads in educational environments. We expect this to diminish as students become empowered to use smart-cloud technologies to promote their educational needs. The iPad and its kin can be thought of as a vade mecum, enhancing everyone’s learning in a fourth dimension and can fit into modern pedagogies.
    • Field-based pedagogies for developing learners' independence

      Fuller, Ian; France, Derek; Massey University, University of Chester (Edward Elgar, 2019-12-30)
      For fieldwork to be effective in fostering independent thinking it requires careful design and alignment within the degree programme (Fuller et al., 2006; Fuller, 2012). In this chapter we draw from our own research evidence and experience to provide examples that illustrate how fieldwork can be successfully embedded in the geography undergraduate curriculum from first to final year adopting specific pedagogies to develop, enhance, and refine students as independent learners throughout their undergraduate career.
    • Fieldwork Going Digital

      Fuller, Ian C.; France, Derek; Massey University, New Zealand; University of Chester, UK (Elsevier, 2014-12-01)
      This chapter provides examples of best practice in teaching physical geography and geomorphology fieldwork in a range of settings from New Zealand and Europe. Firstly we evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating active learning and synthesis opportunities in a tour of North Island geomorphology, using learner-generated video clips summarizing landscape features, processes and management issues. Secondly, we focus on deploying digital video in field experiments within process geomorphology, which introduce students to sophisticated technology and standard field-sampling procedures. Digital video increases engagement and enjoyment involved in data collection and improves understanding of methods employed. Thirdly, we discuss the use of Web 3.0 Technology in field teaching more broadly in physical geography. Here iPads were primarily used to take photographs, video, browse the web, enter raw data and as a tool to aid reflection, through tweets and short videos. The devices facilitated engagement and group interactions on residential fieldwork.This chapter provides examples of best practice in teaching physical geography and geomorphology fieldwork in a range of settings from New Zealand and Europe. Firstly we evaluate the effectiveness of incorporating active learning and synthesis opportunities in a tour of North Island geomorphology, using learner-generated video clips summarizing landscape features, processes and management issues. Secondly, we focus on deploying digital video in field experiments within process geomorphology, which introduce students to sophisticated technology and standard field-sampling procedures. Digital video increases engagement and enjoyment involved in data collection and improves understanding of methods employed. Thirdly, we discuss the use of Web 3.0 Technology in field teaching more broadly in physical geography. Here iPads were primarily used to take photographs, video, browse the web, enter raw data and as a tool to aid reflection, through tweets and short videos. The devices facilitated engagement and group interactions on residential fieldwork.
    • Fieldwork@40: fieldwork in geography higher education

      Haigh, Martin; France, Derek (Informa UK Limited, 2018-09-09)
    • Fieldwork@40: fieldwork in geography higher education

      France, Derek; Haigh, Martin; University of Chester; Oxford Brookes University (Taylor & Francis, 2018-09-09)
      Fieldwork is the most powerful learning invitation in the toolkit of Geographical Education. This review of papers in The Journal of Geography in Higher Education (JGHE) suggests seven modes in the development of fieldwork. These are arrayed as a kind of historical, perhaps evolutionary, sequence but most remain current in Geography fieldwork practice. At the far end (1960s) of the sequence are didactic modes that are teacher centred and use the field as an adjunct to the classroom, in the middle (1990s) are modes that involve active learning and focus on the development of students as investigators and at the near end (2010s) are those that centred on the field study area and its qualities, that involve concern about the ethics of student engagement and that employ blended learning technologies. The review charts the JGHE’s gradual shift away from its original, almost exclusively, UK-focus toward something rather more international and inclusive. Fieldwork is where Geographers learn “from doing” Geography to “do” Geography. Its special attributes include providing experiential, sometimes transformative, learning through the immersion of the learner in the field experience. In 40 years, JGHE has helped Geography Fieldwork move from the margins of the curriculum to its current place at its core.
    • Geotagging photographs in student fieldwork

      Welsh, Katharine E.; France, Derek; Whalley, W. Brian; Park, Julian R.; University of Chester ; University of Chester ; University of Sheffield ; University of Reading (Routledge, 2012-01-23)
      This article provides guidance for staff and students on the potential educational benefits, limitations and applications of geotagging photographs.
    • Graduate attributes: implications for higher education practice and policy: Introduction

      Hill, Jennifer; Walkington, Helen; France, Derek; University of the West of England; Oxford Brookes University; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2016-04-13)
      This publication is an introduction to a collection or a symposium of seven papers themed papers around graduates attributes. They originate from a series of conference sessions convened and chaired by the authors in 2013 at two events: the Royal Geographical Society (with Institute of British Geographers) Annual International Conference held in London, UK, and the Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting held in Los Angeles, USA
    • The history of the Higher Education Research Group of the UK Royal Geographical Society: The changing status and focus of geography education in the academy

      Healey, Ruth L.; France, Derek; Hill, Jennifer; West, Harry; University of Chester; University of Gloucestershire; University of the West of England
      The opening paper in our special section sets the scene for the discussions that follow by evidencing and reflecting upon the history of the Higher Education Research Group. We report on the purpose of the Group when it was established in the late 1970s as the Higher Education Learning Working Party, and trace its development to late 2019 when its members voted to change the name of the Group to the Geography and Education Research Group. Through a systematic analysis of the annual reports published in Area (from 1980 to 1994) and the minutes of the Annual General Meetings (from 1998 to 2019), alongside personal correspondence with former members of the Committee, we explore the history of the Group. We contend that the Group has passed through four distinct phases related to the broader geography and education context. The recent re-naming of the Group to publicly codify and celebrate the diversity of links between geography and education represents a fifth phase in the Group’s evolution. Throughout its history, the Group has had strong connections with geographies (and geographers) of education across a range of sectoral levels, indicating that this fifth evolutionary phase aligns well with the Group’s original purpose and vision.
    • How to produce a digital story

      France, Derek; Wakefield, Kelly; University of Chester ; Loughborough University (Routledge, 2011-11)
      This article discusses how digital stories (collection of still images, audio and video) can be used to assess geography undergraduates and offers guidance to students on how to create the best digital stories for assessment.