• The Value of Discourse Analysis: A Clinical Psychologist’s View.

      Kiyimba, Nikki; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-09-02)
      As a discipline, Clinical Psychology has historically favoured a positivist approach to understanding human behaviour, and clinical psychological practice has been largely informed by research based on quantitative methods. Psychologists have tended to exploit the methodologies of the natural sciences by measuring phenomena (Peters, 2010). This bias towards quantitative research may at least in part be a function of how the discipline of psychology has from its genesis, been careful to define itself as a science. It seems that the development of a broader engagement with alternative methods has largely grown from challenges to psychology’s conception of what constitutes science, and debates regarding its merits developed in relation to our thinking about science (Biggerstaff, 2012). The growth of qualitative methods in psychology is therefore relatively new despite the rich history of the approach (Howitt, 2010). However, now that psychology is more securely established, this has begun to lead to a refreshing openness to embrace qualitative process methodology as well as outcome research.
    • The Value of Using Discourse and Conversation Analysis as Evidence to Inform Practice in Counselling and Therapeutic Interactions.

      Kiyimba, Nikki; O'Reilly, Michelle; University of Chester and University of Leicester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016-04-08)
      This is a commissioned chapter for an edited collection in The Palgrave Handbook of Adult Mental Health. It focusses on the benefits of using the analytic methodologies of discourse analysis and conversation analysis in studying therapeutic and counselling interactions. In particular it examines the value of qualitative research of this kind as evidence within the evidence-based hierarchy for therapeutic practice.
    • Velo-Diverstet: Cykler til Alle

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (Bicycle Innovation Lab, Copenhagen, 2012-06-08)
    • Voices of deficit: Mental health, criminal victimisation and epistemic injustice

      Carver, Liddy; Morley, Sharon; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (SAGE, 2016-11-03)
      People who endure mental and emotional distress experience a plethora of negative experiences beyond the effects of the symptoms themselves. For centuries, the designation of labels of difference; that is, those which transgress approved social norms, have affected the lived experiences of those individuals, and more widely in structuring responses, engagements with, and attitudes between society and the individual. Understanding the creation of tainted identities, particularly of those with experience of mental and emotional distress have been well rehearsed in the sociological literature of the second half of the twentieth century. Central to much of this analysis has been to understand the nature of the manufacture of deviant identities, how they are sustained and the impact of these identities on those who experience them. This paper explores the experience of those with mental and emotional distress as a victim of crime. The interconnectedness of matters of identity created though the application of a diagnosis of illness/disorder is addressed as is the crisis of criminal victimisation. This is achieved via an exploration of contemporary concerns surrounding victims of crime with experience of mental and emotional distress, including the (further) loss of voice and agency when interfacing with agencies of the State.
    • Volunteering, Aging and Business

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Nova Publishers, 2013-09-18)
      This book analyses the key issues inherent for the voluntary sector as it relates to the experiences of older people. The book reviews the major issues for older people's needs and rights. The book attempts to develop and foster interdisciplinary arguments for linking business principles to capacity building of the voluntary sector.
    • 'We are alone in the house': A case study addressing researcher safety and risk

      Kiyimba, Nikki; O'Reilly, Michelle; University of Chester; University of Leicester (Taylor & Francis, 2013-01-08)
      Historically, the safety of research participants has taken precedence in health research. More recently, however, in response to anecdotal reports, there is growing concern for researcher safety, which has resulted in policy development. Also, there is a small body of empirical discussion emerging. In this article, we present a case study example of a particular incident that happened to one of the authors during the course of data collection. We present this as a case study using two sources of data to support the narrative. We utilise extracts from the original interview in which the threat to safety occurred, and this is supplemented by an interview with the transcriptionist who transcribed the threatening interview. Using thematic analysis, we found three key themes from the data: physical threat, emotional responses, and managing risk. Our findings suggest that despite reflectively considering and adhering to valuable protocols relating to risk assessment, unprecedented events may still occur. We recommend, therefore, that research teams develop strategies to manage the implications and impact of research involvement to maintain a healthy research team.
    • The Welfare State in Post-industrial Society

      Powell, Jason; Hendricks, Joe; University of Chester; Oregon State University (Springer Verlag, 2009-09-15)
      In recent years, major social forces such as: aging populations, social trends, migration patterns, and the globalization of economies, have reshaped social welfare policies and practices across the globe. Multinational corporations, NGOs, and other international organizations have begun to influence social policy at a national and local level. Among the many ramifications of these changes is that globalizing influences may hinder the ability of individual nation-states to effect policies that are beneficial to them on a local level. With contributions from different countries worldwide, this collected work represents the first major comparative analysis on the effect of globalization on the international welfare state. The Welfare State in Post-Industrial Society is divided into two major sections: the first draws from a number of leading social welfare researchers from diverse countries who point to the nation-state as case studies; highlighting how it goes about establishing and revising social welfare provisions. The second portion of the volume then moves to a more global perspective in its analysis and questioning of the impact of globalisation on citizenship and marketization. A unique aspect of the volume is that all authors participated in an iterative process to identify a series of consensus themes that each author was then asked to integrate into their chapters as they were relevant.
    • Welsh Primary Schoolchildren’s Perceptions of Electronic Cigarettes: A Mixed Methods Study

      Porcellato, Lorna; Ross-Houle, Kim; Quigg, Zara; Harris, Jane; Bigland, Charlotte; Bates, Rebecca; Timpson, Hannah; Gee, Ivan; Bishop, Julie; Gould, Ashley; et al.
      There are concerns that the growing popularity of e-cigarettes promotes experimentation among children. Given the influence of the early years on attitude and habit formation, better understanding of how younger children perceive vaping before experimentation begins is needed, to prevent uptake and inform tobacco control strategies. We explored Welsh primary schoolchildren’s (aged 7–11) awareness of e-cigarettes relative to tobacco smoking, their understanding of the perceived risks and benefits and their intentions and beliefs about vaping. Data was collected using a mix of methods in June and July 2017 from 8 purposively selected primary schools across Wales. Four hundred and ninety-five children (52% female) aged 7 years (n = 165), 9 years (n = 185) and 11 years (n = 145) completed a class-administered booklet encompassing a draw and write exercise and survey. Ninety-six children participated in 24 peer discussion groups comprised of 2 boys and 2 girls from each year group. Data were analysed independently and findings triangulated. Survey analyses used frequencies, descriptive statistics and chi-squared tests. Content analysis was undertaken on the draw and write data and peer discussion groups were analysed thematically. Study findings highlight that primary schoolchildren have general awareness of e-cigarettes. Vaping was perceived to be healthier than smoking and there was some recognition that e-cigarettes were used for smoking cessation. Understanding of any health harms was limited. Few children intended to smoke or vape in the future but almost half thought it was okay for grownups. Children’s perceptions were influenced by exposure through family and friends. Findings suggest a need for e-cigarette education in primary schools, to highlight the associated risks of e-cigarette experimentation including the potential for tobacco initiation.
    • Westminster’s Narration of the Neoliberal Crisis: Rationalising the Irrational?

      White, Holly; Edge Hill University (EG Press, 2017-07-23)
      This chapter introduces my doctoral research, which contributes an analysis of Westminster definers’ narration of the 2007 onwards-neoliberal capitalist crisis to the British public concerned with their strategies for maintaining hegemony. Firstly, it explains that neoliberals seized the opportunity presented by the neoliberal crisis to extend the project’s reach and deepen its roots and operated to ensure it did not become a crisis of neoliberalism. Second it argues that Westminster definers constructed a narrative that attempted to rationalise a response that truth, empirical evidence followed by sound reasoning, deems irrational but which serves the interests of private capital. Thirdly, the chapter presents an overview of the research design.
    • What Counsellors and Spiritual Directors Can Learn from Each Other: Ethical Practice, Training and Supervision

      Gubi, Peter M.; University of Chester (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2017-07-01)
      Book on what Counselling and Spiritual Direction have to learn from each other
    • ‘What I’m not gonna buy’: Algorithmic culture jamming and anti-consumer politics on YouTube

      Wood, Rachel; University of Chester
      This article is based on an analysis of ‘anti-haul’ videos on YouTube, where a vlogger explains which beauty products they plan not to buy. Anti-haul vloggers have much in common with ‘culture jamming’ movements, which use the communicative practices and materials of promotional culture against itself to spread an anti-consumerist agenda. The article argues that anti-hauls should be understood as the reinvention of ‘culture jamming’ techniques for a contemporary promotional culture that is platform based, algorithmically governed, and mobilised through the affective, authentic performance of the ‘influencer’. I refer to this manipulation of the platform’s visibility mechanisms to spread anti-consumer messages as ‘algorithmic culture jamming’. The anti-consumer politics of anti-hauls are contradictory and ambivalent. At the same time, I argue that anti-hauls also offer important possibilities for political learning, personal and collective transformation, and alternative creative pleasures outside of continual consumer accumulation.
    • Where do we go from zero?

      Reeves, Andrew; University of Chester (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2018-09-30)
      When writing about working with suicide risk, the temptation is to focus only on the practical details – contracting, managing confidentiality and so on – as these are often at the forefront of practitioners’ minds. However, in this article I want to explore working with suicide potential from a more relational perspective – once we move beyond the risk assessment tools and questionnaires, where do we go next?
    • Where have we come from? Where are we going to? Academic research on cycling

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (2012-09-21)
      The lecture gives an overview of the emergence of academic research into cycling and the bicycle over recent decades. It identifies major themes and disciplinary areas in which cycling studies are currently being made and organisational strategies to support these studies. It explores the potential and the necessity for cross disciplinary studies and the opportunities for international collaboration. It considers the tension between advocacy and academic disinterest/distance and looks forward to ways in which studies in cycling can be integrated for greater impact.
    • White Collar Crime

      Horsley, Mark; University of Chester (Routledge, 2014-03-28)
      A short introductory chapter on white collar crime aimed at an undergraduate readership
    • Who put the brakes on cycling in Britain?

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (The Conversation, 2013-05-05)
      This article discusses how cities can be made more bicycle-friendly.
    • Wider implications of bike design diversity

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (TuWien, 2014)
    • Wider implications of bike design diversity

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (2014-03-10)
    • Women, gendered roles, domesticity and cycling in Britain, 1930-1980

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2015-06-01)
      This book chapter discusses women and cycling in Britain, 1930-1980.
    • Women’s narratives on their interactions with the first response police officer following an incidence of domestic violence in the UK

      Keeling, June J.; Van Wormer, Katherine; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester ; University of Iowa ; University of Chester (OMICS Group International, 2015-06)
      Historically police responses towards the treatment of domestic disturbances regard them as a noncriminal problem. Recent changes to societal and Criminal Justice System attitudes to domestic violence now places an emphasis on first response officers to effectively deal with offenders, manage victim safety and gather evidence. This study explored fifteen women’s interactions with the attending first response police officer following an episode of domestic violence within the home. A qualitative approach using unstructured narrative interviews was chosen to ensure that each woman remained in control of the research interview. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes concerning power relations and officer attitudes, suggesting that personal and cultural factors may negatively impact on officers’ handling of complaints of partner assault, offsetting policy initiatives that guide officers in engaging with victims of domestic violence. The order of the themes reflects the sequential nature of the women’s dialogue. The first theme explores the initial police response, followed by the women’s narratives around feelings of personal disregard for their experiences and evidential considerations. The final theme explores the police response to retraction of statements. Women’s interactions with first response officers following domestic violence illuminates societal issues previously unmentioned. Making womens’ stories visible provides an important insight, contribution and opportunity to examine first response officer’s responses to domestic violence. Integrating the voices of the women (service users) themselves, is arguably an advantageous consideration towards continuing professional development training for all first response police officers.
    • Work and society: Places, spaces and identities

      Taylor, Paul J.; Wagg, Paul; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2014-10)
      The original theoretical and empirical studies in this new edited volume, Work and Society: Places, Spaces and Identities, present a re-imagining of what work is, how it is undertaken, and the impact of work on people who engage in it. While traditional examinations of work are synonymous with discussions of labour markets, organisational functions and industrial relations, the eight contributions published here for the first time extend our conceptualisation of work to take in less commonly scrutinised activities such as care-giving, soldiering, gambling and career criminality. This intriguing approach opens up space for an exciting reconsideration of the relationships between work and society, focussing on illegitimate and unvalued occupations, the places where personal and professional identities intersect in risky or rewarding ways, and the ideological imperative on all of us – no matter our employment status – to perform as resilient, productive neoliberal subjects with the capacity for work. This innovative, interdisciplinary volume brings together established and new voices in the fields of sociology, criminology, victimology and political economy to present an accessible intervention in current debates about work in the twenty-first century.