• Obesity and health: Understanding the issues in Pakistani women living in the UK

      Ludwig, Alison F.; Ellahi, Basma; Cox, Peter; University of Chester (British Sociological Association, 2008)
    • Object in focus: The cargo bike

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (British Society for the History of Science, 2015-10)
      Two images of carrier tricycles, built almost a century apart. The first is from a 1912 catalogue in the archives from the Deutsches Museum in Munich. The second is a Christiana Bike from a recent catalogue. At a glance, they appear to show remarkable continuity, even the longevity of a single technological artifact. But their histories tell hidden stories of social change, in shops and shopping, of counter-culture and alternative lifestyle, and of the convergence of environmental sustainability and economic efficiency in the 21st century.
    • Oil Corrupts Elections: The Political Economy of Vote-Buying in Nigeria

      Francis, Suzanne; Onapajo, Hakeem; Uzodike, Ufo; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal (University of Florida, Center for African Studies, 2015-03)
      The extant perspectives on vote-buying have produced three central arguments around its causes, which are the factors of poverty, the electoral/voting system, and the nature of politics in the state. Going beyond these perspectives, this study presents the argument that vote-buying can also be explained by considering the nature of the political economy of a state, especially when the state is oil-‑dependent. The Nigerian case study demonstrates this argument. We employ the “oil-impedes-democracy” framework, which is a strand of the resource curse theory, to argue that the incidence of vote‑buying in Nigeria’s contemporary elections is prevalent because of the oil wealth associated with politics and elections in the state. This is because abundant oil wealth intensifies elite competition, which explains the use of all strategies to win elections including vote-buying. This is also facilitated by the fact that the political elite, especially the incumbent, have adequate access to oil wealth and spend it to “buy” elections and hold on to power. Voters, on their part, also prefer to sell their votes during elections to have a share of the “national cake” given their perception of the wealth associated with politics in Nigeria and the poor service delivery by politicians after assuming state offices.
    • Old age, victimisation and crime

      Powell, Jason; Coventry University (Sacha and Diamond Academic Publishers, 2014)
      This article explores old age as an important sociological and legal dimension of analysis and dissects its relationship to victimisation and contemporary crime.
    • Old age, vulnerability and sexual violence: implications for knowledge and practice

      Jones, Helen; Powell, Jason; Leeds Beckett University; University of Chester (Wiley, 2006-09-10)
      This paper seeks to offer further analysis on the relationship between abuse of power, elder abuse and sexual violence. Importantly, current definitions are examined and the existing literature is reviewed to establish what the current level of debate is on sexual violence in its relationship to elderly women. We conclude that marginalization results in inadequate redress to issues of violence and power that may manifest against the older person, and which leads to feelings of vulnerability. There are important implications for helping health professionals, especially nurses, for understanding the policy, theory and practice. The need for empirical research in this difficult area is paramount.
    • Ongoing processes of managing consent: the empirical ethics of using video-recording in clinical practice and research

      O'Reilly, Michelle; Parker, Nicola; Hutchby, Ian; University of Leicester (Sage, 2011-12-05)
      Using video to facilitate data collection has become increasingly common in health research. Using video in research, however, does raise additional ethical concerns. In this paper we utilise family therapy data to provide empirical evidence of how recording equipment is treated. We show that families made a distinction between what was observed through the video by the reflecting team and what was being recorded onto videotape. We show that all parties actively negotiated what should and should not go ‘on the record’ with particular attention to sensitive topics and the responsibility of the therapist. Our findings have important implications for both clinical professionals and researchers using video data. We maintain that informed consent should be an ongoing process and with this in mind we present some arguments pertaining to the current debates in this field of health care practice.
    • Online participation in the UK: Testing a 'contextualised' model of internet effects

      Gibson, Rachel; Lusoli, Wainer; Ward, Stephen (Blackwell, 2005-11)
      This article discusses a new test of the mobilisation thesis on how the internet effects political participation. The data is taken from a May 2002 NOP survey of 1972 UK adults.
    • Out of the frying pan into the fire. Education, counselling and target-driven culture.

      Egeli, Cemil; University of Chester (PCCS Books, 2018-06)
      I write my review as a conversation between three aspects of my working self - a teacher, lecturer (in counselling skills) and a counsellor, I shall abbreviate these to T L C – I think the world needs more of it.
    • The paradoxes of cyclotourism: Constructing and consuming nature

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (2013-08-14)
      As an archetypal form of low carbon footprint travel, bicycle tourism appears on the surface to be an ideal candidate for sustainable tourism. Taking a longer historical view, however, one begins to become aware of complex paradoxes emerging from cyclotourist practices. Examination of cyclotourists’ own writings shows how nature and the natural have been successively constructed as an object of discourse. Two themes are of especial interest in this study. First, a discourse of wilderness and otherness is apparent as a key theme reinvented in differing forms by successive generations of riders and writers. Second, there is a parallel discourse of domestication at work in which nature and the natural become tamed and part of the human. Although apparently contradictory, these two themes are deeply intertwined in the literature: the cyclotourist is simultaneously both apart from the landscape and yet belongs in it. Further, the relationship between rider and the spaces ridden has had consequences in terms of the built environment as cyclists pioneered road improvements, transforming the object of their narrative. The paper draws principally on archival material from The Cyclists’ Touring Club (CTC) in the UK (founded 1878) to explore changing constructions of, and attitudes toward, ‘nature’. It chronicles changing attitudes and it analyses the production and reproduction of discourses and maps their transformation through the 20th century. In conclusion it also points to the ambiguities and contradictions inherent in contemporary cyclotourist practices as these have become much more closely enmeshed in the fossil fuel economy through changes in modes of activity.
    • Parents’ resistance of anticipated blame through alignment strategies: a discursive argument for temporary exclusion of children from family therapy.

      Kiyimba, Nikki; O'Reilly, Michelle; University of Chester; University of Leicester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-09-02)
      In this chapter, we utilise a discourse perspective to explore ways in which parents manage therapeutic alignment in family therapy. As therapy is an activity which relies heavily on the use of language (McLeod, 2001), we use a language-based analytic approach to explore child mental health, particularly as discourse analysis is most appropriate for looking at family therapy processes (Roy-Chowdhury, 2003). In this chapter, we present a case for the deliberate temporary exclusion of children in the initial stages of a series of therapeutic sessions. The purpose of this temporary exclusion is to provide opportunities for therapists to engage in active solution-focused alignment with parents in order to provide a foundation and set boundaries for later work with the whole family. We also argue that while this initial session with parents is taking place, the child could be otherwise engaged in a session of their own so that the child’s perspective and expectations are also managed effectively.
    • Participatory design for future care related technologies: lessons from the Smart Distress Monitor Project

      Pratesi, Alessandro; Sixsmith, Judith; Woolrych, Ryan (Universidad Iberoamericana Puebla, 2012)
      The impact of care related technology on older people’s health and well-being is growing constantly and at a rapid pace. Participatory approaches to the design and development of care related technology have become increasingly common; however, these approaches have often included older people simply as test participants, rather than co-researchers, in the evaluation of developing technologies. This paper presents a participatory project involving older people in the design and development of an intelligent activity/inactivity monitoring system for domestic environments. In order to be successful, the development of such a system must be viewed less as a technological challenge and more as the creation of an integrated socio-technical system in which technology is functional to the people and organisations involved.
    • Pastoral supervision for clergy and pastoral workers: A personal perspective

      Gubi, Peter M.; University of Chester (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, 2016-07-01)
      NA
    • A person-centred approach to breaking the trans-generational cycle of parental rejection

      Clare, Tracey; University of Chester (PCCS Books, 2018-03)
      This article uses a case study to explore the concept of self-worth as related to perceived parental rejection in childhood, and the process of becoming a parent oneself.
    • Personalisation Services and Care: The Case of England

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Open Access Text, 2016-05)
      Personalization services are developing in England as a social policy response to user demands for more tailored, effective and flexible forms of health and social care support. This process is being implemented under the personalization which is also seen as a vehicle for promoting service user rights through increasing participation, empowerment and control while also promoting self-surveillance by having users manage the costs of their health and social care., There has been an accelerating interest in the implementation of personalisation policies relying upon a relentless political campaign to legitimise an enforced obligation to care, ie, UK Prime Minister Cameron’s notion of a “Big Society”. The use of personalisation that focus on self-assessment and inspection, can, in this policy and austere climate, become a means of self-surveillance. It is argued that Michel Foucault offers a set of strategies (Foucault 1977: 205) for understanding how the discourses on personalisation construct service users experiences and their identities, as constructed subjects and objects of social policy and managerial knowledge.
    • The philosophical language of death and power

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (2015)
      This article is concerned with understanding the relationship of philosophical languages of death with the social philosophy of Michel Foucault. Foucault’s theoretical tools ‘make sense’ of languages of death in institutions such as care homes. While our responses to death and dying would seem to be very personal and therefore individually determined, they are, in fact, greatly influenced by the beliefs of individuals and “experts” who work in institutions providing care. Therefore, this article not only examines the limitations of bio-medicalized languages of death and dying, but importantly emphasises the importance of Foucault’s conceptual tools to methodologically interrogate how death is managed in institutional care.
    • Place, Space and Identity: The Manifold Experience of Transition In and After the Military

      Albertson, Katherine; Taylor, Paul; Murray, Emma; Sheffield Hallam University; University of Chester; Liverpool John Moores University (SAGE publications, 2019-03-08)
      This special edition of Illness, Crisis and Loss brings together established authors in the field of military and post-military life. It is an invitation to readers to critically consider the experience of those serving in the military, and what post-military life ca look like. Each article encourages readers to develop an intellectual awareness of significant issues facing those who serve in the military, and their careers and identity afterwards. Each taking particular themes as their focus, they provide a rigorously informed critical investigation of military and post-military life. Readers of these articles will be provided with a rich, social theory-informed, approach to military and veteran studies. Transition within and out of the military institution is a substantive focus. In the reader’s engagement with each article, we encourage them to think about how and where transition occurs. What places does it take place in? What spaces does it change or create, and how are identities formed, reimagined, or recrafted by the self or others.
    • The pleasure imperative? Reflecting on sexual pleasure’s inclusion in sex education and sexual health settings.

      Wood, Rachel; Hirst, Julia; Wilson, Liz; Burns O'Connell, Georgina; University of Chester, Sheffield Hallam University (Taylor and Francis, 2018-04-30)
      This article offers an empirically grounded contribution to scholarship exploring the ways in which pleasure is ‘put to work’ in sex and sexuality education. Such research has cautioned against framing pleasure as a normative requirement of sexual activity and hence reproducing a ‘pleasure imperative’. This paper draws on interviews with sexual health and education practitioners who engaged with Pleasure Project resources and training between 2007 and 2016. Findings suggest that practitioners tend to understand pleasure within critical frameworks that allow them to avoid normalising and (re)enforcing a pleasure imperative. Accounts also show negotiations with, and strategic deployments of, values surrounding sexual pleasure in society and culture. While some accounts suggest that a pleasure imperative does run the risk of being reproduced by practitioners, notably this is when discussing more ‘contentious’ sexual practices. Interviews also demonstrate that practitioners attempting to implement a pleasure agenda are faced with a range of challenges. While some positive, holistic, and inclusive practice has been afforded by a pleasure approach, we argue that the importance of a critical framework needs to be (re)emphasised. The paper concludes by highlighting areas for further empirical research.
    • Policing the Neoliberal Crisis’: An Introduction to my PhD Research

      White, Holly; Edge Hill University (European Group for the Study of Deviance and Social Control, 2014-07)
      In ‘Policing the Neoliberal Crisis’ Holly White utilises the theoretical insights of Stuart Hall to explore how neoliberal elites have seized upon the current economic crisis to legitimise an increasingly punitive welfare system and a broader ideological narrative of a ‘ war against the poor’. Drawing upon her experience as a volunteer for the Citizens Advice Bureau, Holly White makes explicit connections between changes in the macro political economy and micro policy developments in the UK concerning homelessness and the ‘Bedroom tax’. As her conclusion indicates, her work is interventionist, focusing upon the current operationalization of neoliberal hegemony and how alternative critical imaginaries and social movements are being either nurtured or suppressed.