• Habermas

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Nova Science Publishers, 2012-11-30)
      This book explores the work of German philosopher and social theorist Jurgen Habermas. It provides a context for the emergence of his critical theory and key influences. The text explores Habermas's key aspirations of the enlightenment project and the possibilities for emancipatory practice. Whilst there are several important strategies Habermas claims we should adhere to such as a reconstruction of the lifeworld through communicative action, there are several implications that need to be engaged with.
    • Health and GDP

      Fernandez, Rosa M.; University of Chester (Springer, 2019)
      This piece looks at the relationship between health, development and economic growth, going beyond the traditional and incorrect use of GDP as a measure of welfare. The focus will be given to explain the relationship between investments in health and progress in development and growth. This will be done through the analysis of existing literature from health and economics disciplines, as well as the works (studies and reports) of international organisations. The contribution of this piece to the existing body of work will be the compilation of empirical evidence used as basis for policy recommendations. Specific areas that will be covered are the consideration of health as part of human capital, and the relationship between health and education, development and GDP.
    • Health and Trust Relations

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Sryahwa, 2018-09-13)
      The paper is a critical review of the problems and implications of trust and in managing health in the British health system. It is a system in need of strong management in the light of the global downturn in recently. Despite of policies on leadership in health in the UK, the macro issues for why the needs of diverse groups are not met are difficult to understand at particular levels of analysis. The central problem has been lack of ‘trust’ relations. The paper detangles the implications of different forms of trust in order to understand health relations in health contexts which has implications for practitioner, policy makers and medical personnel.
    • Helping clients who are suicidal or self-injuring

      Reeves, Andrew; University of Chester (SAGE, 2015-12-17)
      The chapter considers how a pluralistic approach can be used to inform therapeutic work with people at risk of suicide or who are self-injuring. It includes theoretical considerations, practice guidance and ethical implications of such work.
    • Helping Professions and Aging: Theory, Policy and Practice

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Nova Science Publishers, 2013-11-16)
      This book explores the development of helping professions with older people. It provides a theoretical excursion drawing from French philosophy to examine how social work as a helping profession has changed its form and shape with older people in order to reinvent itself. The book attempts to explore the matrix of theory, policy and practice in exploring the past to the present to the future in exploring new developments and the latest research on helping professions with regard to older people.
    • Hospice

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Wiley, 2015-12-21)
      This explores the rise of the hospice movement in the US.
    • How do counsellors and psychotherapists understand diet and nutrition as part of the therapy process?

      Terry, Nicola; Reeves, Andrew; University of Chester (Wiley, 2015-08-13)
      Background: Opinion and information in the public domain suggest that an individual's dietary and nutritional intake may be an important factor in both their physical and mental health. However, at this time in the counselling and psychotherapy field, it is not common for therapists to address issues of dietary intake and nutrition with clients. Aims: This qualitative heuristic study explores the perceptions and beliefs of qualified counsellors and psychotherapists, exploring how they understand dietary and nutritional information to be relevant as part of the therapeutic process with clients. Method: six participants were recruited through email, journal advert, poster and leaflet distribution. Data were gathered with semi-structured telephone interviews and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Findings: Seventeen themes were identified and organised under four master themes: (A) personal aspects of the therapist; (B) therapeutic approach and philosophy; (C) diet and nutrition within the therapy process; and (D) considering ethical practice. Implications: Implications for practice include the consideration of multidisciplinary working and developing appropriate training for practitioners in this area.
    • Human Trafficking in South Africa: Political Conundrums and Consequences

      Francis, Suzanne; Emser, Monique; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal (Springer, 2014-06)
      Human trafficking remains a seemingly unsolvable problem despite over a decade of concerted international, regional and, increasingly, domestic attention. Little inroads have been made, especially in attempting to address its most prominent manifestation – human trafficking for the purposes of sexual exploitation. Most government resources, in states from which victims are trafficked and in those in which they are received, have focused upon attempting to end this form of human trafficking. This has been done in two ways: either through draconian measures that focus on the security of the state (and curbing migration), or by attempting to eradicate the sex industry through criminalisation of consumers, and the continued criminalisation of sex workers. Such strategies have had little measurable effect on the supply or demand of those trafficked, which suggests that such counter-trafficking measures remain largely ineffective. Moreover, this preoccupation with the dark, exploitative side of the sex industry has been at the expense of a focus upon what is thought to be a far more pervasive form of human trafficking (which also intersects with sexual exploitation), that is labour trafficking. (Labour trafficking is an umbrella term used to denote trafficking for forced and bonded labour (in an array of industries), which also includes domestic servitude and forced marriage, forced begging, and the exploitation in warfare.) Hence, only the ways in human trafficking is manifested is addressed, and not the root causes of the phenomenon.
    • I love to ride my bike: Living and promoting active mobility

      Cox, Peter; University Of Chester (2014-11-26)
    • I'm Half Turkish - Dancing Bears and Marble Stairs

      Egeli, Cemil; University of Chester (PCCS Books, 2016-12)
      This article explores some of my life experiences as a person of mixed culture.
    • The IFP Campaign: Indlovu ayisindwa kawbaphambili!

      Francis, Suzanne; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal (Jacana, 2010)
      The paper explores the alternative vision adopted by the Inkatha Freedom Party in their 2009 campaign. It focused on core supporters, local democratic branch structures and processes, a re-assertion of core values as central, and a re-casting of public policy to meet the needs of a heterogeneous society. Most importantly, it was a campaign that, win or lose, they fought alone without an ally or an impending coalition, and they fought it as a coherent party for the first time since 1994. The IFP, in the campaign, offered an alternative vision of ethics, etiquette and respect in government which was to speak to well educated, illiterate, wealthy and impoverished voters alike across the ideological spectrum. This was a new vision of integrity and public service that would pull South Africa back from the ‘brink of a crisis of governance’ and was rooted in the IFP discourse of etiquette and respect of customary good manners in a method of politics that spoke directly to political behaviour and transcended ideological divisions. Framed in the spirit of ubuntu-botho and the discourse of self-help, the IFP were to offer this alternative vision of as their method of governance. Unlike other parties, the IFP campaign set itself apart by its very political culture and not simply in its ideological and policy positions.
    • Impeachment as an accountability measure in a presidential system. Views from Nigeria's Fourth Republic

      Francis, Suzanne; Fagbadebo, Omololu; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal (University of KwaZulu-Natal and University of St Thomas, 2014)
      Extant provisions of Nigeria’s presidential constitution seek to promote a culture of accountability through a system of checks and balances. Since Nigeria’s return to civil rule in May 1999, promotion of good governance through accountability government continues to be a challenge. All indications point to a worsening governance crisis in the midst of abundant resources. Besides, Nigeria’s socio-economic performance and visible poor service delivery depict a deepening governance crisis occasioned by mismanagement of public resources. The data collected by means of documents and literature indicates that the presidential system has checks and balances as measures to prevent the abuse of power. Impeachment is the major institutionally recognised legislative mechanism to hold the executive accountable. The puzzle since the inception of Nigeria’s Fourth Republic is the failure of the legislature to appropriate this statutory authority to police the execution of public policies in a manner that will conform to the constitutional requirements. While there are requisite constitutional provisions that mandate the legislature to ascertain its power over the executive, indicating Nigeria’s commitment to the promotion of good governance, the legislature has failed to appropriate these instruments to stimulate a responsible government that is open to promoting good governance. Using the theories of structural functionalism and elites, this paper argues that this legislative failure to appropriate the instrument of impeachment to instil the culture of responsible executive in policy process engenders the prevailing governance crisis in Nigeria. The paper concludes that a political system where systemic corruption prevails will reduce impeachment to a mere instrument of political vendetta.
    • The importance of relationship

      Gubi, Peter M.; University of Chester (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2015-02)
    • In a search for meaning: Challenging the accepted know-how of working with suicide risk

      Reeves, Andrew; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2017-09-14)
      This opinion piece considers the current predominance of assessment tools and strategies in working with people at risk of suicide, and questions their efficacy and how they are privileged in day to day mental health practice. While such tools and an evidence-based ‘scientific’ approach to assessment clearly has its place, the author instead asserts that the modus operandi of therapy – a discursive based exploration – has much more to offer and should be the primary intervention in understanding suicide potential. Helping the client to gain insight into the meaning of their suicidality helps position the client – and practitioner – in the best possible place to reduce risk.
    • Institutionalizing Elites: Political Elite Formation and Change in the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Legislature

      Francis, Suzanne; University of Chester (Brill, 2011-12-19)
      In this book, Francis expands and redefines the approach to the problematic of a comprehensive framework for the study of political elites through an interrogation of political elite formation in the African context of the Provincial Legislature of KwaZulu-Natal. The result is an empirically rich and detailed study of the realization, accumulation and exercise of institutionalized political power. Political elite agency shapes, enables and undermines political institutions and is dependent on a multiplicity of currencies including social and political capital and patterns of culture, respect and institutional capacity. Studies of political elites must now consider not whether elite values, attitudes and patterns of political etiquette penetrate political institutions, but rather how they do so.
    • Interaction of regional and national environmental policies: The case of Spain

      Fernandez, Rosa M.; University of Chester (Cogent OA, 2018-02-23)
      This paper uses a new approach to the concept of green budgeting within the context of green economy to analyse the different factors influencing the lack of consistency on environmental policies in Spain. It appears that structural issues have prevented Spain from becoming a real green economy, and thus from taking the right measures that could lead it into a sustainable growth path. This case study is presented as example of failure to integrate environmental issues in policy-making, with political factors being one of the main variables under analysis. A quantitative analysis on the approach to public environmental budget management during the period prior to the recent economic crisis is conducted at national and regional levels. Some of the findings are consistent with other European countries but some distinctive structural issues are also identified.
    • Intimate Partner Violence and Abuse Against Men: Voices of Victimization Among Ex-Servicemen of the British Armed Forces

      Taylor, Paul J.; Keeling, June J.; Mottershead, Richard; University of Chester; Keele University; University of Chester (SAGE, 2017-07-07)
      This study presents the personal testimonies of male British ex-Armed Forces personnel who have experienced violence and abuse victimization that was perpetrated by civilian female partners. In this research, we argue that to embark upon any understanding of the domestic lives of military personnel, an appreciation of the linkages to the cultural context of the military institution is necessary. Understanding the influence of the military institution beyond the military domain is crucial. We unveil the nature and character of the violence and abuse and how the servicemen negotiated their relationships. In doing so, we highlight the embodiment of military discipline, skills, and tactics in the home—not ones of violence which may be routinely linked to military masculinities; rather ones of restraint, tolerance, stoicism, and the reduction of a threat to inconsequential individual significance.
    • Introduction

      Gubi, Peter M.; University of Chester (Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2015-02)
    • An Introduction to Counselling: From Theory to Practice

      Reeves, Andrew; The University of Chester (Sage, 2018-05-26)
      An authoritative introductory text for counselling and psychotherapy