• Gender, Masculinity, Contemporary History and the Psychiatric Secure Estate: Back to the Future?

      Powell, Jason; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (World Scientific News, 2015-10-10)
      In contemporary history, the use of gendered treatments for women with mental health issues in the psychiatric secure estate is an issue of major concern in Great Britain. This paper examines women and gender in the psychiatric secure estate from a structural analysis drawing influence from Connell‟s (1987) theoretical and conceptual work on hegemonic masculinity. Bio-psychological approaches have almost dominated academic discussion in relation to women‟s incarceration and there is an reflexive need to develop other sociological frameworks on hegemonic masculinity because dominant bio-psychological models have failed to identify underlying configurations which combine to oppress women whilst simultaneously reproducing consequences of masculinity and power within institutional structures.
    • Gender, numbers and substance: The "politics of presence" and parliamentary women in KwaZulu-Natal

      Francis, Suzanne; University of Chester; University of KwaZulu-Natal (University of KwaZulu-Natal Press, 2009)
      This article investigates four dimensions of the political institutional representation of women by women parliamentarians in KwaZulu-Natal. It begins by exploring whether or not women Members of the Provincial Parliament (MPPs) actively seek to substantively represent women, and how they do this. Secondly, it probes the perceptions they hold of their impact in this area. Third, the question of whether and how contested conceptions of political representation impact on attempts to feminise the agenda, is raised. Lastly, the article explores the impact of women MPPs via the institutional mechanism of the Women’s Parliamentary Caucus (WPC). The results show that the majority of parliamentary women do seek to represent women and claim effectiveness in doing so. Challenges to this agenda however include party identity, and racial and cultural conceptions of representation that divide women and strengthen resistance to change. It was also found that while the WPC provides an arena for women to elucidate their specific concerns and partly circumvent the constraints of party and racial and cultural representation, its institutional inadequacies were found to impact negatively upon the women’s agenda – a factor recognised only by a minority of women MPPs.
    • A Genealogy of Old Age, Welfare and Professional Power

      Powell, Jason; Coventry University (Institute for Public Enterprise, 2013-12-29)
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    • Genuine partnership and equitable research: working “with” older people to develop a smart activity monitoring system

      Pratesi, Alessandro; Sixsmith, Judith; Woolrych, Ryan (2013-12)
      Recent UK government policy has highlighted the value of user involvement in service development, particularly concerning assistive technologies and their role in providing care. This article illustrates the case of a person-centred, participatory project involving older people in the design, implementation and development of innovative technological solutions to enable older people to live independently and age-in-place within their homes and communities. The research aims and objectives included: the identification of technological, psychological and social needs of older people; the definition of user requirements to inform an activity monitoring system for use in private homes and residential care settings; and the analysis of the ways in which such systems impact on the everyday lives of older adults in different settings. The innovative aspects of the user-driven, participatory approach illustrated in this paper concern the involvement of older people as co-researchers throughout the research process. This article reports the reflexive accounts which emerged during the project and provides viable and practical pathways to facilitate participatory research in the development of assistive technology for older adults. It provides practical guidelines for future user-driven, participatory research involving older adults in the design, development and implementation of assistive technologies. Our findings show that developing authentic, non-tokenistic research partnerships and including older people’s ideas, motivations and perspectives in the design and development of these types of technology can lead to productive forms of mutual inspiration and technological solutions grounded in the experiences of older people.
    • Girls being Rey: ethical cultural consumption, families and popular feminism

      Wood, Rachel; Litherland, Benjamin; Reed, Elizabeth (Informa UK Limited, 2019-08-29)
    • The Global Challenge: Aging Populations, Bio-medicine and China

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Nova Publishers, 2013-12-15)
      This book explores the global challenge: understanding aging as a medical concept, social concept and population term. The focus is on China and global aging. The book further assesses the rapid rise of aging populations and what could be entitled ‘The Silver Tsunami’, highlighting how an unstoppable force of populational aging needs to be analyzed and what the social and economic implications are for all continents across the globe.
    • The Global Dynamics of Aging

      Powell, Jason; Chen, Sheying; University of Chester; Pace University (Nova Publishers, 2012-09-19)
      This book explores the issue of global ageing and its impact on different nation states across the world. It is in three parts: the first part sets the scene about the challenges of global ageing; part two utilises a number of case studies examining how different nation states manage social issues associated with acing; the final part explores the impact of global ageing on some of the continents such as Europe and the Americas. The book is by its very nature global as it brings researchers from all parts of the world to give the reader a very rich comparative book.
    • The global south: The case of populational aging in Africa and Asia

      Powell, Jason; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (World Scientific News, 2015-06)
      This paper explores the implications of social and economic changes in the Global South of the World. In particular, we examine case studies of Japan and China and the impact of populational aging on their economic policies and social practices. Key examples of uneven distributions of, or access to, opportunities have the potential to give rise to further social or economic tensions. Whilst the scholarly base is expanding, more is to be done to ascertain the characterization of inequalities. Indeed, if these substantive issues are to be addressed comprehensively, the key then is to move beyond a Western academic paradigm, and to purposefully involve critical scholarship from intellectuals from the Global South. Doing so will add a vitality of experience in discussing how economic growth is, or may not be coupled with, inequality.
    • Globalisation and global aging

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Nova Science Publishers, 2013)
    • Globalisation of what? Power, knowledge and neocolonialism

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (Chester Academic Press, 2007)
      This book chapter discusses some of the underlying themes that are raised in the juxtaposition of globalisation debates and debates concerning the contemporary nature of imperialism and its relationship to the process of globalisation.
    • Globalization and Implications to Governance in Post-Industrial Economies.

      Powell, Jason; Coventry University (Institute of Public Enterprise, 2013-06-01)
      This article explicates how post-industrial changes in the form of globalization have changed social welfare and public policy making worldwide. In contrast with the economic downturn and global softening of labor markets which cry for greater social protection, the welfare state of the last century has been replaced by a competitive state of the 21st century, as a 'non-sovereign power' mindful of its global positioning but less powerful in shaping daily life among social forces including the role of NGOs. Indicating a lag between transnational developments and the way analysts think of social policies, the paper asserts that nation-states nonetheless serve important administrative functions in a world dominated by transnational corporate interests. In considering all the challenges to justice and governance, social welfare needs to be redefined and extended while market economy must be guided by moral principles that embody fundamental human values.
    • Globalization and Modernity

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (SciPress Ltd, 2014-05-18)
      As we move into the global century, several aspects of social and economic life are changing and post-industrial shifts are unparalleled by virtue of the interconnectedness that brings together the corners of the globe. New technologies, new economic relationships, new social processes, and new political developments are all characteristics of globalization (Hudson and Lowe, 2004: 22) in a post-industrial age featured by information, innovation, finance and services. As the world has contracted, people’s quality of life has changed regardless of where they live. In fact, the propagation of free market mindsets in emerging economies has created collective network connections with considerable good but pervasive inequalities as well. A fundamental aim of this book is to argue that these changes are part of a economic transition to post-industrialism associated with risks and inequalities that shape human experience in the midst of a formidable global financial climate. There is an obvious tension with this. On the one hand, life expectancy, health statuses and per capital incomes are at an all-time high and many feudal practices have been relegated to the past (Phillipson, 2006). On the other hand, vast numbers of people struggle with poverty and significant pockets of poverty portend more than lack of income. Those living on the bottom of the socio-economic ladder labor under the burden of avoidable, lifestyle diseases, hunger and related maladies, not to mention myriad social risks (Turner, 2008). Those on the upper reaches of the same ladder garner disproportionate shares of the resources and are able to support comfortable lifestyles.
    • Globalization and scapes: A new theory of global dynamics

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (2015)
      Globalization has produced a distinctive stage in the social history of populational projections, with a growing tension between nation state-based solutions and anxieties and those formulated by global institutions (Powell, 2011). Globalization, defined here as the process whereby nation-states are influenced (and sometimes undermined) by trans-national actors. Human identity has, itself, become relocated within a trans-national context, with international organisations (such as the World Bank and International Monetary Fund) and cross-border migrations, creating new conditions and environments for many displaced people (Estes, Biggs, & Phillipson, 2003). This paper examines the work of Appadurai and the extent to which has had a large impact on understanding the global dynamics of cultural, technological, political and economic change.
    • ‘Gossiping' as a social action in family therapy: The pseudo-absence and pseudo-presence of children

      Parker, Nicola; O'Reilly, Michelle; Birmingham and Solihull Mental Health Foundation Trust; University of Leicester (Sage, 2012-08-01)
      Family therapists face a number of challenges in their work. When children are present in family therapy they can and do make fleeting contributions. We draw upon naturally occurring family therapy sessions to explore the ‘pseudo-presence’ and ‘pseudo-absence’ of children and the institutional ‘gossiping’ quality these interactions have. Our findings illustrate that a core characteristic of gossiping is its functional role in building alignments’ which in this institutional context is utilized as a way of managing accountability. Our findings have a number of implications for clinical professionals and highlight the value of discourse and conversation analysis techniques for exploring therapeutic interactions.
    • Governing globalization and justice

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (2015)
      This article explicates how 21st Century changes in the form of globalization are of historical scale, how they play out in terms of risks and inequalities shaping human experience, and how they have changed social welfare and public policy making worldwide. After presenting facts of inequality and such consequences as planetary poverty and gender stratification, it highlights the reformulation of economic power associated with burgeoning free-market economies and accompanying diffusion of instrumental rationality, standardization and commodification. In contrast with the recent US economic downturn and global softening of labor markets which cry for greater social protection, the welfare state of the last century has been replaced by a competitive state of the 21st century, as a “non-sovereign power” mindful of its global positioning but less powerful in shaping daily life among social forces including the role of NGOs. Indicating a lag between transnational developments and the way analysts think of social policies, the paper asserts that nation-states nonetheless serve important administrative functions in a world dominated by transnational corporate interests. In considering all the challenges to justice and governance, the authors argue that social welfare needs to be redefined and extended while market economy must be guided by moral principles that embody fundamental human values.
    • Governing the body: The legal, administrative and discursive control of the psychiatric patient

      Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2013)
      This chapter documents the nature and character of controls over the 'psychiatric subject'
    • Governmentality

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Policy Press, 2017-02-15)
      Governmentality is a concept developed by social theorist Michel Foucault (1991) and can be defined as the way in which the State exercises control over, or governs, the body of its populace through ‘action at a distance’. Foucault himself introduced governmentality during his lectures on bio-politics at the College de France in the late 1970s. Foucault (1991: 88) explains that his interest in the art of government was beyond an interest in how it guided actions for men and women, but to understand how the ‘reasoned way of governing best’ and how social institutions contribute to that best form of governing .
    • Habermas

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Nova Science Publishers, 2012-11-30)
      This book explores the work of German philosopher and social theorist Jurgen Habermas. It provides a context for the emergence of his critical theory and key influences. The text explores Habermas's key aspirations of the enlightenment project and the possibilities for emancipatory practice. Whilst there are several important strategies Habermas claims we should adhere to such as a reconstruction of the lifeworld through communicative action, there are several implications that need to be engaged with.
    • Health and GDP

      Fernandez, Rosa M.; University of Chester (Springer, 2019)
      This piece looks at the relationship between health, development and economic growth, going beyond the traditional and incorrect use of GDP as a measure of welfare. The focus will be given to explain the relationship between investments in health and progress in development and growth. This will be done through the analysis of existing literature from health and economics disciplines, as well as the works (studies and reports) of international organisations. The contribution of this piece to the existing body of work will be the compilation of empirical evidence used as basis for policy recommendations. Specific areas that will be covered are the consideration of health as part of human capital, and the relationship between health and education, development and GDP.
    • Health and Trust Relations

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Sryahwa, 2018-09-13)
      The paper is a critical review of the problems and implications of trust and in managing health in the British health system. It is a system in need of strong management in the light of the global downturn in recently. Despite of policies on leadership in health in the UK, the macro issues for why the needs of diverse groups are not met are difficult to understand at particular levels of analysis. The central problem has been lack of ‘trust’ relations. The paper detangles the implications of different forms of trust in order to understand health relations in health contexts which has implications for practitioner, policy makers and medical personnel.