• Bicycle design history and systems

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-02-02)
      This chapter focuses on the ways in which bicycle design connects with a range of factors; how external forces may shape reinterpretations of bicycle design, and how bicycle design, in turn, may be used to try to shape the external world. Two historical cases are explored to show how bicycles, as design objects, are entangled with practices and identities: Germany in the 1920s and 1930s and England in the 1960s and 1970s. In the first case, design is used to reproduce and reinforce a dominant political ideology through reinterpretation rather than innovation. Here the bicycle allows new connections to be made between state and citizen. In the second case, design innovation is employed to challenge dominant ideologies of mobility: bicycles are used to connect citizens to new mobility practices. Both cases illustrate the relations between design and politics and both have implications for inclusion and access aspects of social justice. Both studies make use of close reading of manufacturers’ literature but place it more strongly in a political/cultural context to understand the relationship between the design objects and wider society.
    • Biking and Tourism

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (2016-02-24)
      Keynote presentation at Cycling Forum, organized by Institute of Parks and Recreation, held at the Urban Redevelopment Authority, Singapore.
    • The Bio‐Medical Model and Ageing: Towards an Anti‐Reductionist Model?

      Powell, Jason; Owen, Tim; University of Chester; UCLan (Emerald, 2005-09-10)
      Anti‐reductionist social theory is a relatively ‘new’ but methodically eclectic body of theory which analyses the complexity of the tripartite theory, policy and practice.
    • Book review of Bruce D. Epperson (2014) Bicycles in American Highway Planning. The critical years of policy-making 1969-1991. Jefferson, NC: McFarland

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (2015-12)
      Book review of Bruce D. Epperson (2014) Bicycles in American Highway Planning. The critical years of policy-making 1969-1991. Jefferson, NC: McFarland
    • Book review: Quest for speed

      Cox, Peter; University Of Chester (Manchester University Press, 2013-12)
      This is a book review of Quest for Speed, a book which brings together a wealth of data on the emergence of cycling racing and, in particular, on the relationship between sport and technological innovation.
    • Book Reviews

      Gutelius, Beth; Gibson, Janet; Zunino Singh, Dhan; Gold, Steven J.; Portmann, Alexandra; Cox, Peter; Volti, Rudi; Drummond-Cole, Adrian; Spalding, Steven D. (Berghahn Books, 2017-12-01)
      Matthew Heins, The Globalization of American Infrastructure: The Shipping Container and Freight Transportation (New York: Routledge, 2016), 222 pp., $145 (hardback)Lesley Murray and Susan Robertson, eds., Intergenerational Mobilities: Relationality, Age and Lifecourse (London: Routledge, 2017), 194 pp., 14 illustrations, $145 (hardback)Sebastián Ureta, Assembling Policy: Transantiago, Human Devices, and the Dream of a World-Class Society (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2015), 224 pp., 22 illustrations, $39 (hardback)Yuk Wah Chan, David Haines, and Jonathan H. X. Lee, eds., The Age of Asian Migration: Continuity, Diversity, and Susceptibility, vol. 1 (Newcastle on Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014), 450 pp., £54.99Robert Henke and Eric Nicholson, eds., Transnational Mobilities in Early Modern Theater (Farnham: Ashgate, 2014) 320 pp., 22 illustrations, $117 (hardback)Ruth Oldenziel and Helmuth Trischler, eds., Cycling and Recycling: Histories of Sustainable Practices (Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2016), 256 pp., 18 illustrations, £67 (hardback)Margo T. Oge, Driving the Future: Combating Climate Change with Cleaner, Smarter Cars (New York: Arcade, 2015), xv + 351 pp., $25.99 (hardback)Thomas Birtchnell, Satya Savitzky, and John Urry, eds., Cargomobilities: Moving Materials in a Global Age (New York: Routledge, 2015), 236 pp., 16 illustrations, $148 (hardback)Jacques Lob and Jean-Marc Rochette, Snowpiercer 1: The Escape, trans. Virginie Sélavy (London: Titan Comics, 2014), 110 pp., $19 (hardback)
    • Breaking up with Jesus: a phenomenological exploration of the experience of deconversion from an Evangelical Christian faith to Atheism

      Lee, Karen A.; Gubi, Peter M.; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2019-06-10)
      This study examines the experience of deconversion from an Evangelical Christian faith to Atheism in the UK. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six participants and the data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. The resulting superordinate themes emerged: Process of Deconversion; Post Deconversion Issues; What Helped and Did Not Help. The findings are supportive of similar research conducted on deconversion but are from the UK, rather than from a largely American, perspective. The underlying reason for deconversion is found to be cognitive dissonance and, as such, deconversion is a rational and intellectual process. Helping professionals need to convey a non-judgemental attitude, being understanding, sympathetic, supportive and kind.
    • Building a case for accessing service provision in child and adolescent mental health assessments

      O'Reilly, Michelle; Kiyimba, Nikki; Lester, Jessica N. (Sage, 2019-04-29)
      In everyday conversations, people put forward versions of events and provide supporting evidence to build a credible case. In environments where there are potentially competing versions, case-building may take a more systematic format. Specifically, we conducted a rhetorical analysis to consider how in child mental health settings, families work to present a credible ‘doctorable’ reason for attendance. Data consisted of video-recordings of 28 families undergoing mental health assessments. Our findings point to eight rhetorical devices utilised in this environment to build a case. The devices functioned rhetorically to add credibility and authenticate the case being built, which was relevant as the only resource available to families claiming the presence of a mental health difficulty in the child were their spoken words. In other words, the ‘problem’ was something constructed through talk and therefore the kinds of resources used were seminal in decision-making.
    • Care and trust: A new understanding

      Powell, Jason; Chen, Sheying; University of Chester; Pace University (Open Access Text, 2017-12-14)
      The paper is a critical review of the problems and implications of trust and in managing diversity in the British community care system. It is a system in need of strong diversity management in the light of the world economic downturn in recent years. Despite raft of policies on leadership in social care in the UK, the structural issues for why the needs of diverse groups are not met are difficult to understand at particular levels of analysis. The central problem has been lack of ‘trust’. The paper detangles the implications of different forms of trust in order to understand care relations in health contexts.
    • Cargo bikes: Distributing consumer goods

      Cox, Peter; Rzewnicki, Randy; University of Chester ; European Cyclists’ Federation (University of Chester Press, 2015)
      This book chapter considers the role of human powered vehicles: bicycles and tricycles, in this mundane distribution of consumer goods.
    • A case for taking the dual role of counsellor-researcher in qualitative research

      Fleet, Doreen; DasGupta, Mari; Reeves, Andrew; Burton, Amy; University of Staffordshire; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2016-08-03)
      There is ongoing debate about whether the challenges of practice-based research in counselling, with clients’ discourses providing the raw data, can be overcome. This article begins by considering the argument of whether taking a dual role of counsellor-researcher within case study research is a legitimate qualitative approach. A case example using sand-tray in short-term therapy with adults from a pluralistic perspective is provided to demonstrate how the challenges of the dual role can be managed to produce effective research findings. It is suggested that this approach closes the gap between research and practice to produce findings that are highly relevant to the counselling context. The ethical considerations of taking a dual role of counsellor-researcher are considered, and opportunities and challenges when adopting this approach are identified.
    • Cashing in on curiosity and spectacle: The forensic patient and news media

      Morley, Sharon; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2016-05-24)
      Health and social care professionals are gatekeepers to, and custodians of, confidential service user information. In the United Kingdom (UK), police investigations have unveiled cases of payments being made to public service officials by journalists in return for service user information. The purpose of this discussion is to investigate such cases in the context of high security forensic care. This paper provides a discussion drawing upon two UK-based case studies of prosecutions of public service workers relating to the sale of confidential information. The analysis presented here illuminates upon the salient and connected issues at work that have led to the transgression of legal obligations and professional responsibilities/principles of confidentiality. A fuller reading of the context in which these transgressions occur, and motivations that exist, may well serve to inform policy, training, guidance or vigilance in relation to the preserving of service user information in the future.
    • Celebrity ambassador/celebrity endorsement – takes a licking but keeps on ticking

      Proctor, Tony; Kitchen, Philip J. (Informa UK Limited, 2018-01-25)
    • Chain reaction: interviewing interviewers. Positionality and qualitative research

      Pratesi, Alessandro; Runswich-Cole, Katherine; Manchester Metropolitan University (2010-07)
      NA
    • #Cheshirehunger: Understanding Emergency Food Provision in West Cheshire

      Spencer, Alec; Ogden, Cassandra A.; Battarbee, Lynda; West Cheshire Foodbank, University of Chester, Trussell Trust (2015-03-01)
      A report exploring the use of foodbanks and the reasons behind their use, within the West-Cheshire region.
    • China, Aging and Health

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Lupine Publishers, 2018-09-11)
      Academics from across the world are increasingly concerned about the rising numbers of older people in their society. There are worries about the inadequacy of pension funds, of growing pressures on health systems, and on the inability of shrinking numbers of younger people to carry the burden of their elders. This article focuses on such health issues in China, where the older people have become a rapidly expanding proportion of the population. While resources do need to be targeted on the vulnerable older people, the presumption that older people as a whole are an economic and health burden must be questioned. This is an agist view that needs to be combated by locating how bio-medical views on aging seep into health policy spaces in China that position negative perceptions of aging as both individual and populational problems. The article then moves to observe the implications of bio-medicine for older people in China in terms of "vulnerable" aging but deconstruct such "fixed" explanations by juxtaposing active aging as key narrative that epitomizes "declining to decline" as espoused by health sciences.
    • Cities, States and Bicycles. Writing Cycling Histories and Struggling for Policy Relevance.

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (SAGE, 2017-03-30)
      A Review Essay
    • Cittadinanza e inclusione sociale tra emozioni e pratiche di cura. Il caso dei rifugiati e dei richiedenti asilo in Europa.

      Pratesi, Alessandro; University of Chester (Ethics and Politics, 2016)
      The theoretical contribution illustrated in this article is aimed at highlighting the vast potentialities emerging from the intersection of citizenship studies, ethics of care studies and the sociology of emotions; in other words, emerging from the intersection of the concept of citizenship with the concept of care and the emotional dynamics revolving around them. The analysis is developed within the context of our rapidly changing global societies and in light of some of the most recent developments concerning the so-called European refugee crisis. The overall objective is getting insights in the multiple ways in which new forms of citizenship and social inclusion are creatively performed at the local level, i.e. at the level of micro-interactions, even when forms of exclusion, borders-defence attitudes and racism persist at the institutional and political level.
    • Class And Competition: The Gentrification Of Sport Cycling

      Cox, Peter; University of Chester (jack Thurston, The Chain, Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, 2013-02-12)
      This article uses a study of a range of literary sources on cycle sport to understand how social class has been represented class in relation to a number of sporting cycling activities. It examines the messages implicit in particular growth areas of participant and professional sport cycling to understand how these relate to wider changes in class identity.
    • Clients’ experiences of premature termination of counselling and psychotherapy

      Gubi, Peter M.; Bonsmann, Christine F.; University of Chester (PCCS Books, 2017-07-01)
      This research explores clients’ experiences of terminating counselling prematurely. The findings inform practitioners’ practice in managing premature termination and provide insights into clients’ needs.