• The clinical use of Subjective Units of Distress scales (SUDs) in child mental health assessments: A thematic evaluation.

      Kiyimba, Nikki; O’Reilly, Michelle; Karim, Khalid; University of Chester; University of Leicester (Taylor & Francis, 2017-07-04)
      Background: Despite the ubiquitous use of Subjective Units of Distress scales (SUDs) in mental health settings to establish levels of distressing emotion, there has been little empirical research in this area. SUDs are commonly used in therapy and assessments, and are a particularly useful tool for establishing current and previous levels of distress in children and young people. Aims: To explore the use of the SUD analogue rating scale in initial child mental health assessments to better understand its application in this context. Method: The data corpus consisted of 28 naturally-occurring video recordings of children and young people attending their first assessment appointment at Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS). A thematic analysis was utilised to explore the specific interactional use of SUDs. Results: Four themes were identified; recency, longevity, context and miscommunication. The first three themes were found to supplement the child’s emotional score on the scale and were important in establishing the necessity for further therapeutic support. Miscommunication as a theme highlighted the need for clarity when using SUDs with children and young people. Conclusions: Recommendations were suggested for practitioners working with children and young people relating to the extended use of rating scales in clinical assessments.
    • 'We are alone in the house': A case study addressing researcher safety and risk

      Kiyimba, Nikki; O'Reilly, Michelle; University of Chester; University of Leicester (Taylor & Francis, 2013-01-08)
      Historically, the safety of research participants has taken precedence in health research. More recently, however, in response to anecdotal reports, there is growing concern for researcher safety, which has resulted in policy development. Also, there is a small body of empirical discussion emerging. In this article, we present a case study example of a particular incident that happened to one of the authors during the course of data collection. We present this as a case study using two sources of data to support the narrative. We utilise extracts from the original interview in which the threat to safety occurred, and this is supplemented by an interview with the transcriptionist who transcribed the threatening interview. Using thematic analysis, we found three key themes from the data: physical threat, emotional responses, and managing risk. Our findings suggest that despite reflectively considering and adhering to valuable protocols relating to risk assessment, unprecedented events may still occur. We recommend, therefore, that research teams develop strategies to manage the implications and impact of research involvement to maintain a healthy research team.