• Care and trust: A new understanding

      Powell, Jason; Chen, Sheying; University of Chester; Pace University (Open Access Text, 2017-12-14)
      The paper is a critical review of the problems and implications of trust and in managing diversity in the British community care system. It is a system in need of strong diversity management in the light of the world economic downturn in recent years. Despite raft of policies on leadership in social care in the UK, the structural issues for why the needs of diverse groups are not met are difficult to understand at particular levels of analysis. The central problem has been lack of ‘trust’. The paper detangles the implications of different forms of trust in order to understand care relations in health contexts.
    • Doing Care, Doing Citizenship. Towards a Micro-situated and Emotion-based Model of Social Inclusion

      Pratesi, Alessandro; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018-01)
      The book examines the emotional, micro-situated dynamics of status inclusion/exclusion that people produce while caring for others by focusing, in particular, on non-conventional families. Grounded in empirical research that involves different types of care and family contexts, the book situates care within more inclusive and critical approaches while shedding light on its multiple and often overlooked meanings and implications. Engaging and accompanied by a useful methodological appendix, Doing Care, Doing Citizenship is essential reading for students and academics of sociology, psychology, social work and social theory. It will also be of interest to practitioners interested in developing their understanding of the relationship between care, emotions, social inclusion and citizenship.
    • Reconciling Work, Care and Justice: informal care, status inclusion and self-empowering dynamics

      Pratesi, Alessandro; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2014-09-30)
    • Social Policy and Narrative: The Global and State Contradictions of Care

      Powell, Jason; University of Chester (Sryahwa, 2018-10-01)
      This article provides a critical assessment of the assumptions and narratives underpinning the development of social policy initiatives targeting caring relationships based upon family ties. At the time of writing in late 2018, the impact of globalization has had a profound impact but we cannot underemphasise state power in examining care policy, theory and practice. Hence, deploying a narrative approach attention is drawn to the ways in which family identities are open to a far greater range of negotiation than is assumed by policy. Drawing on the United Kingdom as a case example, questions are posed about intergenerational relations and the nature of late life citizenship. The comparatively recent invention of narratives supporting ‘informal care’ and the link with neo-liberal and ‘third way’ notions of active citizenship are explored. As is the failure of policy developments to take into account the diversity of care giving styles and the complexity of caring relationships. It is argued that the uneven and locally specific ways in which policy develops enables the co-existence of a complex range of narratives about family, caring and ageing which address diverse aspects of the family life of older people in often contradictory ways.