• From Kama Sutra to dot.com: The history, myths and management of premature ejaculation

      Astbury-Ward, Edna; Deeside Community Hospital (Taylor & Francis, 2010-08)
      As long as man has breathed, his quest for the perfect sexual experience seems to have eluded him. Often the experience has been brought to an abrupt end by the misery of premature ejaculation. This paper will look at the history of premature ejaculation, charting the importance of this event throughout the years and across cultures. It will look at all modern day therapies and will discuss the implications of introducing pharmocotherapy to a problem that has been traditionally treated by sex therapy.
    • Menopause, sexuality and culture: Is there a universal experience?

      Astbury-Ward, Edna; Deeside Community Hospital (Taylor & Francis, 2003-05)
      Menopause is a universal phenomenon, but do all women experience a universal event? The aim of this article is to identify common trends or patterns occurring exclusively within certain different cultures, and whether these have an effect on how menopause is experienced or perceived by those women. This paper will first consider the physiological changes that occur during menopause and will then look at psychosocial influences that may affect women's perception and experience of menopause.
    • A questionnaire survey of the provision of training in human sexuality in schools of nursing in the UK

      Astbury-Ward, Edna; Glyndŵr University (Taylor & Francis, 2011-10-05)
      The inconsistent and haphazard approach to the provision of training in human sexuality to health professionals in the UK and elsewhere has been a matter of concern for over half a century. This article discusses the implications of findings from a questionnaire survey of 41 schools of nursing in the UK regarding their provision of training in human sexuality. Schools of nursing were chosen, as nurses form by far the largest employment group in the NHS today. The aim of this questionnaire survey was to obtain information on the provision of training in human sexuality in schools of nursing in the UK. The 20-item mixed qualitative and quantitative questionnaire was designed to elicit maximum information about research questions, it was independently validated after focus group discussion. The results drawn from this study will be primarily presented as observations, rather than statistically tested statements. The provision of training in human sexuality in the pre-registration nursing curricula in the UK is inadequate to meet the current varied needs of patients. On average, a mere 6.8 hours out of a potential 2300 hours of theoretical learning is dedicated to teaching human sexuality in schools of health in the UK. This is considerably less time than is dedicated to other areas of learning within the curriculum. The overall provision of training in human sexuality in the nursing curricula does not seem to have significantly improved, regardless of pleas from such esteemed bodies as the World Health Organisation and others.