• PERSONAL NARRATIVES OF AGING.

      Taylor, Louise; Bailey, Jan; Kingston, Paul; Eost-Telling, Charlotte (2019-11-08)
      AbstractThis presentation reflects on self-written narratives from respondents to a mass observation directive, focusing on the experiences of growing older. Narrative methods are theoretically and methodologically diverse, and are helpful in social research to understand events or happenings in human lives. This data presents accounts from a heterogeneous sample in the form of self-penned responses. These experience-centred narratives bring stories of personal understanding into being by means of the first person description of past, present, future or imaginary experiences. This presentation will focus on the findings with reference to physical and mental impacts, both real and anticipated. We will also explore themes arising from the data including gender differences, age-cohort effects and stigma. The data can be used to inform Health and Social Care education and practice, particularly in co-producing appropriate person-centred services with older people.
    • The Perspective of Socioeconomic Inequalities and Infectious Disease in 21st Century

      Massey, Alan; Mabhala, Mzwandile A.; University of Chester (OMICS Group International, 2016-04-20)
      At the turn of the new century, the United Nations set a series of global health goals to be achieved by 2015. Amongst the eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), goal six aimed to combat HIV, malaria and other diseases.
    • Perspectives on supporting fathers affected by postnatal depression and a history of violence

      Keeling, June J.; Laws, Thomas; University of Chester; University of Salford (Mark Allen Healthcare, 2018-01-23)
      Intimate partner violence during the perinatal period is a significant public health problem that remains under-screened, under-diagnosed and under-treated. The establishment of evidence based guidelines to aid Health Visitors in providing provide support for couples experiencing violence has been hampered by the complex interplay between maternal and paternal mental health problems and violence. Our study explored the experiences of UK fathers voluntarily engaged with services designed to redeem their ideation to violence. The findings indicate that a tendency to violence was increased by stresses associated with the transition to parenthood. Men felt pressured by concerns for their partners' mental health, changes to their relationship with the mother, sleep disturbances and the burden of infant care they assumed when the mother could no longer cope. Health Visitors are ideally situated to assess for factors linked to the emergence of violence and pre-empt the support needed to minimise its occurrence.
    • Phenomenological characteristics of autobiographical memories: responsiveness to an induced negative mood state in those with and without a previous history of depression.

      Mitchell, Andrew E. P.; University of Chester (Vizja Press & IT, 2016-06-30)
      In this study we investigated the relative accessibility of phenomenological characteristics in autobiographical memories of 104 students with and without a previous history of a depression. Participants recalled personal events that were elicited with cue words and then asked to rate these personal events for a number of phenomenological characteristics. The characteristics were typicality, rumination, valence, importance of others, expectancy, desirability, and personal importance. The effects of previous history of depression (without history or with previous history of depression) and self-reported mood (pre- and post-negative mood induction) on autobiographical recall was examined by employing a mixed factor design. Self-reported mood was measured as a manipulation check, before and after Mood Induction Procedure. Typicality, rumination and personal importance showed significant interaction effects in those with a history of depression. Ordinal regression supported the finding that those with a history of depression had a higher chance of typicality and personal importance than those without a history of depression. The results indicate that recall of autobiographical characteristics is in part dependent on induced negative mood state and on previous history of depression. The findings may prompt future research into targeted interventions that reduce individual tendencies for heightened cognitive reactivity in negative mood states for those with a history of depression.
    • Physical health assessment in mental health practice

      Collins, Eve; University of Chester (SAGE, 2013-01-15)
      This book chapter aims to discuss the importance of providing effective physical health assessments for individuals with mental health problems; explain the processes of conducting a comprehensive health history; and identify the health parameters which should be assessed as part of the physical examination for individuals with mental health propblems.
    • The physical health needs of individuals with mental health problems - setting the scene

      Drake, Mandy; University of Chester (SAGE, 2013-01-15)
      This book chapter aims to identify the main physical health conditions affecting individuals with mental health problems; explain the reasons for poor physical health among this client group; discuss the barriers to physical health improvement; provide an overview of the political agenda in relation to physical and mental health co-morbidity; and debate the mental health practitioner's role in physical health care.
    • Planning for a second wave pandemic of COVID-19 and planning for winter : A statement from the Association of Schools of Public Health in the European Region

      Middleton, John; Lopes, Henrique; Michelson, Kai; Reid, John; Wolverhampton University; Universidade Cato´lica; Fulda University; University of Chester
      Planning for a second wave pandemic of COVID-19 and planning for winter : A statement from the Association of Schools of Public Health in the European Region
    • Policy drivers

      Baldwin, Moyra A.; Wilson, Frances; University of Chester (2008-09)
      This powerpoint presentation discusses issues raised in developing and evaluating an education programme to meet the health and social care commissioning agenda of the twenty-first century.
    • Policy drivers

      Mabhala, Mzwandile A.; University of Chester (SAGE, 2010-10-15)
      This book chapter discusses policy documents and policy drivers relating to palliative care.
    • Politicisation or Professionalisation? Exploring divergent aims within UK voluntary sector peer mentoring

      Buck, Gillian; University of Chester (Wiley, 2019-09-04)
      Meaningful ‘user involvement’ is an established aim of social work practice, and increasingly, an aspiration of criminal justice, yet there are unique challenges to participatory work within punitive contexts. Drawing upon a study of peer mentoring in the voluntary sector, this article unveils some core tensions related to (ex)service user involvement in criminal justice. Interviews with mentors, mentees, and key stakeholders, along with direct observations of practice, reveal that respondents often see their work as personal-political, emphasising the value of lived expertise and of collective action to address limiting social conditions. Simultaneously, however, mentoring is framed nationally and shaped locally by more established aims to correct, improve, and manage, individual ‘offenders’. There is, therefore, a fundamental tension between processes of politicisation, or coming together to assert a user voice and affect social change; and professionalisation, wherein mentors are co-opted into forms of practice they often critique.
    • Population Health Screening after Environmental Pollution

      Stewart, Alex G.; orcid: 0000-0002-4931-5340; email: dragonsteeth@doctors.org.uk; Wilkinson, Ewan; orcid: 0000-0002-2167-8756; email: ewilkinson@chester.ac.uk (MDPI, 2020-11-24)
      Following environmental pollution exposure, calls to screen the population for disease or disease markers are often made. Population screening is a cross-sectional review of a population to find latent cases or biomarkers of disease that indicate the possibility of disease development; it differs from environmental screening or an epidemiological survey. Recognized standard approaches have been developed over 60 years to ensure quality and effectiveness in complex programs. We surveyed the literature for papers on health screening following environmental exposures and checked them for reference to accepted criteria such as those of Wilson and Jungner. We applied these criteria to three situations covering source/hazard (arsenic contaminated land), pathway/exposure (radiation release), and receptor/disease (lead poisoning). We identified 36 relevant papers. Although across the papers the whole range of criteria were addressed, no paper or program utilized recognized criteria. Issues and gaps identified included limited strategic approaches, lack of treatment, environmental prevention being seen as the screening outcome instead of treatment of identified individuals, and programs which did not fit the World Health Organization screening description. Robust discussion in the literature is needed to consider the organization and role of health screening following environmental exposures.
    • Postures and positions in labour: Best practice

      Steen, Mary; Anker, Jo; RCM/UCLan; Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (2008-05-21)
      This presentation discussed the evidence and demonstrated different postures and positions that women can adopt during labour.
    • The potential impact of extensive privatisation in the UK upon the ‘life chances’ of young people in care

      Carey, Malcolm; University of Chester (National Youth Agency, 2021-11-01)
      The article considers the potential impact of extensive privatisation in the UK upon the ‘life chances’ of young people in care
    • Pre-admission nursing assessment in a Welsh medium secure unit (1991–2000): Part 1 - an analysis of practice and cost

      Watt, Andrew; Topping-Morris, Barry; Mason, Tom; Rogers, Paul; Institute of Cardiff, University of Wales ; Caswell Clinic, Glanrhyd Hospital ; Glanrhyd Hospital / University of Glamorgan / Chester College of Higher Education ; Institute of Psychiatry / Glanrhyd Hospital (Elsevier, 2003-04-16)
      This article discusses the practice of pre-admission assessments and details a method for estimating the cost of forensic nursing assessments in terms of the investment of nursing time.
    • Pregnancy and birth: Everything you need to know

      Steen, Mary; University of Chester (Dorling Kindersley, 2011-03-01)
      This book provides, practical and visual information that is written in plain English. Pregnancy, birth and following birth is covered in detail. The care and support during pregnancy, birth and the transition to parenthood is described and discussed.It is a comprehensive guide and a useful resource that pregnant women and their partners will find easy to understand.
    • Pregnancy counselling clinic: A questionnaire survey of intimate partner abuse

      Keeling, June J.; Birch, Linda; Green, Pauline; University of Chester ; University of Chester ; Arrowe Park Hospital (BMJ Publishing Group, 2004-07-01)
      This article discusses a study of the prevalence and nature of physical and sexual partner abuse experienced by women who request a termination of pregnancy (TOP). 312 questionnaires were completed by women attending a pregnancy counselling clinic located within a large district general hospital in the north west of England.
    • Preparing British Military nurses to deliver nursing care on deployment. An Afghanistan Study.

      Finnegan, Alan; Finnegan, Sara; Bates, David; Ritsperis, Debra; McCourt, Kath; Thomas, Mike; University of Chester (Elsevier, 2015-01-05)
      Background: This paper forms part of the first British Armed forces qualitative nursing research study undertaken on deployment. Aim: To provide an analysis of the impact and effectiveness of the pre-deployment educational preparation and clinical placements provided for military nurses. Theory & methods: A Constructivist Grounded Theory was utilised with data collected through semi-structured interviews with 18 nurses based in Camp Bastion Hospital, Afghanistan during 2013. Results: Initial coding indicated 21 educational preparation and clinical placement categories that influenced the delivery of nursing care. Analysis of these elements led to the identification of four major clusters: Military Nursing Care; Military Nurse Education; Unique Hospital Environment and Clinical Placements. Discussion: Educational preparation consists of completing deployable operational nursing competencies, specialist training and individual tailored courses. This strategywas viewed as proving the appropriate academic requirement. However, training would be enhanced by introducing a formalised military preceptorship programme focussing on fundamental nursing skills. Caring for children was a particular concern, and it was emphasised that educational courses must be combined with a standardised clinical placement policy. Adequate clinical exposure can be challenging as nurses are not routinely exposed to War Zone levels of trauma in the UK. Clinical placements need to be standardised and harmonised, and located in areas where nurses cared for patientswith similar injury patterns to thosewitnessed on deployment. Current NHS Trust placements can reduce the opportunities for employment in suitable clinical environments and diminishing the openings for collective military training. Better use should bemade of clinical rotation programmes, including high dependency units, elective surgery, medical assessment units, paediatrics, and outreach teams such as burns and plastic surgery and pain management. Practice Educators should be utilised to provide education, mentorship, supervision and continuing personal development in the operational arena. The paper considers post-Afghanistan future options.
    • Preparing to write

      Chapman, Hazel M.; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2013-09-03)
      This chapter explores the psychology of writing, how to reduce stress and anxiety, why writing is important for learning and why you want to write well. The chapter also addresses getting started and finishing well.
    • Preparing to write

      Chapman, Hazel M.; University of Chester (McGraw-Hill / Open University Press, 2013-09-03)
      This chapter explores the following topics: • The psychology of writing • How to reduce stress and anxiety • Why writing is important for learning • Why do you want to write well? • A space of one’s own • Getting started and finishing well • Reading for writing – and other learning resources • Using feedback and accessing support This chapter begins by looking at how your thoughts and feelings about writing, especially writing for assessment, can affect your behaviour. Through understanding what makes you write or prevents you from writing, you can gain control over your writing behaviours, the behaviours that are key to your ultimate performance. This chapter shows the small, simple steps you can take in order to achieve your writing potential. By exploring how to break down the barriers to writing, such as stress and anxiety, this chapter shows how writing can eventually become just another activity, and even an enjoyable habit. We discuss the reasons why writing is important for helping you to learn, and help you to explore your own reasons for wanting to write. This will help you to keep writing, even when you are finding it challenging. The environment you work in is important for developing good writing habits and enabling you to write well, so the chapter discusses how you can create your own writing den and find your favourite writing haunts. Practical tips, such as where to find your ideas from, how to start writing, how to finish your writing session, and how to plan writing for assessment are included. Suggestions on using different sources of information and inspiration for your writing, how to use feedback to improve your writing, and how to get the most from university student support services are given. Writing is an important part of your life when you are studying in health and social care. This chapter helps you to put it into perspective alongside the rest of your life, so that you can approach the act of writing without fear, and develop your writing skills to achieve your full potential in your chosen field within health and social care.