• A meta-analysis of type 1 diabetes mellitus, all-cause and cause-specific mortality

      Eloho, Akata; Cooper, Helen; Bowen-Jones, David; Mabhala, Mzwandile A.; University of Chester (PROSPERO, 2016-04-16)
      A meta-analysis of type 1 diabetes mellitus, all-cause and cause-specific mortality
    • Midwifery and psychological care

      Jones, Alun (Mark Allen Group, 2018-12-02)
    • Midwives reflections: Exploring attitudes, feelings and experiences when caring for women who are being abused

      Steen, Mary; Bharj, Kuldip; Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust/University of Leeds (MIDIRS, 2003-03)
      Domestic violence is a global concern and a major public health issue for midwives. In this article, the authors describe an in-service training programme developed to increase midwives' understanding of domestic violence as well as the use of reflective practice as a learning tool in exploring attitudes and experiences of midwives
    • Mind the Gaps: The rise and implications of cynicism within social work

      Carey, Malcolm; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2012-08-24)
      This paper explores the notable rise of cynicism among state social workers in Britain. Theoretically, cynicism has been viewed as ‘deviant emotion’ and pathology or as offering a type of employee resistance that may protect or support a person’s identity. Drawing upon case study research with practising social workers, the article looks at three different case examples of employee cynicism. These include the cynic as organisational survivor, disenfranchised sceptic or altruist. It was found that, although cynicism within social work predominately emerges as an emotional response to structural change, other factors such as those embodied within professional discourses and government or academic rhetoric can also impact. Other factors such as risk-averse assumptions that distance the practitioner from the ‘service user’ or colleagues can also have influence. Although often viewed negatively, cynicism can greatly benefit an organisation or motivate a practitioner to challenge normative principles and promote the needs of service users and carers.
    • Mind your Language: Discursive Practices Produce Unequal Power and Control Over Infectious Disease: A Critical Discourse Analysis

      Mabhala, Mzwandile; Yohannes, Asmait; Massey, Alan; Reid, John; University of Chester
      Abstract Background: Power, socioeconomic inequalities, and poverty are recognized as some of the fundamental determinants of differences in vulnerability of societies to infectious disease threats. The economic south is carrying a higher burden than those in the economic north. This raises questions about whether social preventions and biomedical preventions for infectious disease are given equal consideration, and about social institutions and structures that frame the debate about infectious disease. This article examines how institutionalized ways of talking about infectious disease reinforces, creates, and sustains health inequalities. Methodology: Critical discourse analysis was considered to be epistemologically and ontologically consistent with the aims and context of this study. Results: The study examined three types of infectious disease: • Emerging infectious diseases/pathogens • Neglected tropical diseases • Vector-borne infections. Examination revealed that poverty is the most common determinant of all three. Conclusion: A sustainable reduction in infectious disease in the southern countries is most likely to be achieved through tackling socioeconomic determinants. There is a need for a change in the discourse on infectious disease, and adopt a discourse that promotes self-determination, rather than one that reinforces the hero-victim scenario and power inequalities. Keyword: Critical discourse, inequalities, infectious disease, poverty, power
    • A mixed methods study to evaluate the feasibility of using the Adolescent Diabetes Needs Assessment Tool App in paediatric diabetes care in preparation for a longitudinal cohort study

      Cooper, Helen; Lancaster, Gillian A.; Gichuru, Phillip K.; Peak, Matthew; University of Chester; Keele University; Lancaster University; NIHR Alder Hey Clinical Research Facility; Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust (BioMed Central, 2017-07-06)
      An evaluation study was carried out to determine the feasibility of integrating the Adolescent Diabetes Needs Assessment Tool (ADNAT) App into UK paediatric diabetes care, to ascertain best practice standards and to determine methodological recommendations for a future cohort study. Methods A non-randomised, cohort, mixed methods study design was used to ensure equality of access to ADNAT for all participants at three sites in the North West of England. Following UK Medical Research Council guidance, the RE-AIM (reach, effectiveness (potential and perceived), adoption, implementation, maintenance) framework was used to guide study objectives and feasibility outcomes. Patients who completed ADNAT (completers) were compared with those who failed to complete (non-completers). Patients’ glycaemic control (HbA1c) was accessed from their clinical data at baseline and at 6 months, alongside their ADNAT scores which were correlated with changes in HbA1c levels. The diabetes teams (respondents) completed a web-based survey and attended focus group interviews. Results Eighty-nine patients were recruited. Withdrawal rates were low at 4.5% (n = 4). Forty-four patients (49.4%) completed ADNAT, leaving 45 (50.6%) non-completers. There were large baseline differences in HbA1c and variable rates of change at 6 months. After adjusting for baseline HbA1C and site in an analysis of covariance, completers had a lower post-ADNAT mean HbA1C level than non-completers at 6 months (-5.42 mmol/mol, 95% CI −11.48, 0.64). Patients’ glycaemic control (HbA1c) at 6 months correlated reasonably well with their ADNAT scores (Spearman’s rho = 0.46). Survey and focus group data showed that ADNAT was judged to be an effective clinical tool by the diabetes teams. Value to patients was perceived by the teams to be linked to parental support, age and previous diabetes education. The combined data triangulated. It served to capture different dimensions which were used to define changes to achieve practice standards and methodological recommendations. Conclusions The combined data showed that ADNAT has the potential to be a clinically viable tool. It has demonstrated the need for a randomised design that is tailored for a ‘hard to reach’ adolescent population. A cluster randomised controlled trial that involves sequential but random rollout of ADNAT over multiple time periods may be the most appropriate and is currently being considered for the larger study.
    • A mixed methods study to evaluate the feasibility of using the Adolescent Diabetes Needs Assessment Tool App in paediatric diabetes care in preparation for a longitudinal cohort study

      Cooper, Helen; Lancaster, Gillian A.; Gichuru, Phillip K.; Peak, Matthew; University of Chester; University of Lancaster; Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust (BioMed Central, 2017-07-06)
      Background. An evaluation study to determine the feasibility of integrating the Adolescent Diabetes Needs Assessment Tool (ADNAT) App into UK paediatric diabetes care, to ascertain best practice standards, and to determine methodological recommendations for a future cohort study. Methods A non-randomised, cohort, mixed methods study design was used to ensure equality of access to ADNAT for all participants at three sites in the North West of England. Patients who completed ADNAT (completers) were compared with those who failed to complete (non-completers). Following UK Medical Research Council guidance, a logic model and the RE-AIM (reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, maintenance) framework were used to define study objectives. Patients’ glycaemic control (HbA1c) was accessed from their clinical data at baseline and at 6 months, alongside their ADNAT scores which were correlated with changes in HbA1c levels. The diabetes teams (respondents) completed a web-based survey and attended focus group interviews. Results 89 patients were recruited. Withdrawal rates were low at 4.5% (n=4). Forty-four patients (49.4%) completed ADNAT, leaving 45 (50.6%) non-completers. There were large baseline differences in HbA1c and variable rates of change at 6 months. After adjusting for baseline HbA1C and site in an Analysis of Covariance, completers had a lower post-ADNAT mean HbA1C level than non-completers at 6 months, suggesting improvement for those using ADNAT (95% CI -11.48, 0.64). Patients’ glycaemic control (HbA1c) at 6 months correlated reasonably well with their ADNAT scores (Spearman’s rho=0.46). Survey and focus group data showed that ADNAT was judged to be an effective clinical tool by the diabetes teams. Value to patients was perceived to be linked to parental support, age and previous diabetes education. The combined data triangulated suggesting validity of the study. It served to capture different dimensions which were used to define best practice standards and methodological recommendations including the need for a team based approach to implementation, broader patient-based outcomes, and non-participant clinic observations. Conclusions The combined data showed that ADNAT was a clinically viable tool and that a future mixed methods, non-randomised, longitudinal cohort study would be feasible following MRC guidance for process evaluation of complex interventions, including use of the piloted logic model and the RE-AIM framework.
    • Mobile app: Living and dying well with dementia

      Bhattacharyya, Sarmishtha; Benbow, Susan M.; Collins, Eve; University of Chester (Wiley, 2017-08-31)
      Digital technology is gaining wider use in healthcare. Here the authors consider whether a mobile application (app) they have developed could help promote understanding of dementia, its impact on those affected and to focus formal and family carers on key issues in end of life care.
    • Mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus: Magnitude of the evidence from a systematic review and meta-analysis

      Nwaneri, Chukwuemeka; Cooper, Helen; Bowen-Jones, David; University of Chester ; University of Chester ; Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust (SAGE, 2013-07-15)
      Type 2 diabetes is associated with an increase in age-related mortality. A systematic review and metaanalysis were performed to define the relative risks (RR) of all-cause or cause-specific mortality in type 2 diabetes and to determine gaps in current research. A comprehensive literature search was undertaken for studies (published 1990–2010) on mortality in type 2 diabetes. The study reports on the measure of mortality as defined by RR for all-cause and cause-specific mortality, heterogeneity, sensitivity analyses and biases. In total 35 studies (220,689 patients; mean follow-up of 10.7 years) were eligible for inclusion: 33 studies reported increased mortality risks; 24 had full data on 95% confidence intervals (CIs), one study reported no excess mortality in men diagnosed after 65 years whereas three reported increased mortality in similar age groups in both sexes. Meta-analysis showed RR = 1.85 (95% CI 1.79–1.92) for all-cause mortality [men RR=1.57 (95% CI 1.46–1.68); women RR=2.0 (95% CI 1.89–2.12)], RR=1.76 (95% CI 1.66–1.88) for cardiovascular mortality and RR=2.26 (95% CI: 1.7-3.02) for stroke. There was no statistically significant evidence of publication bias. Conclusion: Type 2 diabetes increases mortality approximately two-fold increase and macrovascular disease is the principal cause of death.
    • Multi-disciplinary teams

      Baldwin, Moyra A.; University of Chester (SAGE, 2010-10-15)
      This book chapter discusses the importance of multi-disciplinary teamwork - which involves individual professions communicating and collaborating with other disciplines in the team to plan, agree, and implement an excellent standard of palliative care - in contemporary palliative care.
    • Museum collections: Management, conservation and presentation

      Peters, Lisa; McKay, Ian S. H.; University of Chester (2011-09-21)
    • Narrative collisions, sociocultural pressures and dementia: the relational basis of personhood reconsidered

      Tolhurst, Edward; Weicht, Bernhard; Kingston, Paul; Staffordshire University; University of Innsbruck; University of Chester (Wiley, 2017-02-08)
      The concept of personhood developed by Tom Kitwood highlights that the experience of dementia has relational dimensions that transcend the neurodegenerative impacts of the condition. This relational focus, however, has been narrowly conceptualised, with the impact of broader sociocultural factors on experience underplayed. The empirical exploration of interaction also requires reinforcement: a tendency for dyadic studies to portray findings in an individualised format hinders the interrogation of interpersonal negotiations. This article draws upon qualitative research that employed a joint interview approach, interviewing men with dementia and their spousal carers together. The focus on a dyadic case study from this research enables methodical exploration of the experience of living with dementia. This is realised by considering the socially-framed perspective of each person, and then how their perspectives are interwoven within interactional exchanges. This provides a platform for the evaluation of the current decontextualised notion of personhood and its implications. It is concluded that a sociologically informed perspective can help to reinforce the academic understanding of personhood.
    • A narrative review of fathers’ involvement during labour and birth and their influence on decision making

      Longworth, Mary K.; Furber, Christine; Kirk, Susan; University of Manchester (Elsevier, 2015-06-14)
      Objective to identify and critically review the research literature that has examined fathers׳ involvement during labour and birth and their influence on decision making. Design the review follows the approach of a narrative review. Systematic searches of electronic databases Social Services Abstract, Sociological Abstracts, ASSIA, CINAHL Medline, Cochrane library, AMED, BNI, PsycINFO, Embase, Maternity and Infant care, DH-Data and the Kings Fund Database were combined with manual searches of key journals and reference lists. Studies published between 1992 and 2013 examining fathers׳ involvement during intrapartum care were included in the review. Findings the findings of this review suggest that fathers׳ level of involvement during labour ranges from being a witness or passive observer of labour and birth to having an active supporting and coaching role. The findings also suggest that there are a number of facilitators and barriers to fathers׳ involvement during labour and birth. There are a limited number of studies that have examined fathers׳ involvement in decision making and specifically how fathers׳ influence decision making during labour and birth. Key conclusions future research needs to address the gap in the literature regarding fathers׳ involvement and influence on decision making to help midwives and obstetricians understand the process in order enhance the transition to parenthood for women and men.
    • A narrative review of literature on the use of health and social care by older trans adults: what can United Kingdom services learn?

      Benbow, Susan Mary; Eost-Telling, Charlotte; Kingston, Paul; University of Chester; Older Mind Matters Ltd
      We carried out a narrative review and thematic analysis of literature on the physical healthcare, mental healthcare and social care of trans older adults to ascertain what is known about older trans adults’ contacts with and use of health and social care. Thirty papers were found: a majority originated in the United States. Five themes were identified: experience of discrimination/ prejudice and disrespect; health inequalities; socioeconomic inequalities; positive practice; and staff training and education. The first three themes present challenges for providers and service users. Experiences of discrimination/ prejudice and disrespect over the course of their lives powerfully influence how older trans adults engage with care services and practitioners. Health and socio-economic inequalities suggest that older trans adults are likely to have greater need of services and care. The remaining two themes offer opportunities for service improvement. We conclude that more research is needed, that there is a strong argument for taking a life course perspective in a spirit of cultural humility, and that contextual societal factors influence service users and providers. We identify positive trans-inclusive practices which we commend to services. More needs to be done now to make older adult services appropriate and welcoming for trans service users.
    • Natural herd immunity should not be used as a means of pandemic control

      Davidovitch, Nadav; Signorelli, Carlo; Chambaud, Laurent; Tenenbaum, Arianne; Reid, John; Middleton, John; ASPHER COVID-19 Task Force, Brussels, Belgium; School of Public Health, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Be’er Sheva, Israel; Università Vita-Salute, San Raffaele (UniSR), Milan, Italy; École des Hautes Études en Sante Publique (EHESP), Rennes, France; Department of Public Health and Wellbeing, University of Chester, Chester, United Kingdom; Association of Schools of Public Health in the European Region – ASPHER, Brussels, Belgium
      Short opinion article advising against relying on natural herd immunity and need for vaccine derived population immunity. "We need to focus on using successful virus suppression strategies until we reach herd immunity with the new vaccines. We need to track the epidemiology of the virus using population serology, but it is dangerous, and unfounded in science, to advocate natural herd immunity as a means to pandemic control".
    • The neoliberal university, social work and personalised care for older adults

      Carey, Malcolm; University of Chester
      This article critically examines the impact of the neoliberal university upon social work education and practice relating to older people. It appraises market-led pedagogical reforms, including of the training of social workers who go on to work with older adults, such in support of policies including personalisation. Influence is drawn from the work of Nancy Fraser (2019): specifically, her understanding of ‘progressive neoliberalism’, or the improbable fusion of free market ideals with the politics of recognition to create a rejuvenated hegemonic bloc. This theoretical framework is utilized to analyse the prevalence of emancipatory constructs such as empowerment, participation, anti-oppression, equality, choice and independence within acutely underfunded, bureaucratic, and risk-averse fields of social care and social work. While benefiting some older ‘service users’, it is argued that personalisation policy regularly disadvantages or excludes older people within fragmented adult social care sectors. Progressive neoliberalism has helped to promote policies which envisage participative self-care whilst more often excluding or objectifying older adults, especially those with higher level needs.
    • Neoliberalism, managerialism and the reconfiguring of social work in Sweden and the United Kingdom

      Harlow, Elizabeth; Berg, Elizabeth; Barry, Jim; Chandler, John; University of Chester ; Lulea University of Technology ; University of East London ; University of East London (SAGE, 2013-07-01)
      This paper considers some of the ways in which neoliberalism, through the processes of managerialism, has impacted on the occupation of social work in Sweden and the UK. It is argued that there are similar implications in both countries, through the managerial drive for increased performance in economy, efficiency and effectiveness, but also in the development of evidence based practice. Whilst the key focus of the paper is on similarities between these two countries, differences are also noted. There is also recognition of the way in which resistance to the reconfiguration of social work is taking shape.
    • Nerve agents: A guide for emergency nurses. Part 1

      McGhee, Stephen; Finnegan, Alan P.; Clochesy, John; University of Miami; University of Chester
      Recent incidents in the UK and the alleged chemical attacks in Syria by the Bashar al-Assad regime have brought the subject of chemical weapons back into the public domain. To date these types of event have been relatively rare because terrorist plans to harm large numbers of people have mostly been thwarted. This is the first part of a two-part article on nerve agents. Part one gives an overview of these agents, their historical background and manufacture, and how the agents affect physiology. Part two, which will appear in the next issue, considers the pre-hospital response to the use of nerve agents, including effective triage and decontamination, and in-hospital treatment.
    • A new device for the treatment of perineal wounds

      Steen, Mary; Cooper, Keith; Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust/Leeds Metropolitan University (Emap, 1999-02-01)
      This article describes the design, development and evaluation of a new cooling maternity gel pad for the alleviation of perineal pain. Specific details of laboratory investigations of cooling and warm curves for different gel compositions, microbiological challenge tests and MDSA data are discussed. A risk assessment for the designed established that the new device has a low hazard rating and negligible exposure potential. Women’s opinions of treatment effect are highly significant.
    • New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) – “legal highs”

      Khan, Nahim; University of Chester (2016-05-10)
      This is a short true/false quiz on legal highs