• The perceived psychological stressors and coping behaviours in university students, on a pre-registration programme.

      Mitchell, Andrew E. P.; University of Chester (Emerald Publishing, 2020-05-20)
      The purpose was to investigate perceived stressors and coping behaviours in student nurses on a pre-registration programme of study. Stress in student nurses has been identified with decreased emotional well-being and poor academic achievement. The significance of stress and coping behaviours in students during training has implications for education and practice. The present study recruited eighty seven pre-registration student nurses in a cross sectional design. Bivariate and multivariate analyses assessed the differences in field and year of study and the students’ perceived stress and coping behaviours. The findings showed that stress is a significant issue in nurse training. Fifty-three percent of the participants had levels higher than the mean. Interestingly, the present study found that high perceived stress was associated with avoidance behaviours. The most common type of perceived stress and ranked by highest factor were from written assignments and a lack of professional skills and knowledge. Their peer group and everyday life activities were shown as potential ways of coping with stressors. Thus, it seems reasonable to focus support on decreasing avoidant and enhancing stress-reducing behaviours. Psychological stress and coping behaviours must be considered together as perceived stress is bound by the ability to ameliorate stress by managing helpful and unhelpful behaviours. The findings may suggest that a potential benefit could come from the provision of helpful strategies such as peer group support and reduction of avoidant behaviours. Also, there seems to be a need for greater mental health literacy in dealing with stress during training.
    • Resilience and mindfulness in nurse training on an undergraduate curriculum

      Mitchell, Andrew E P; University of Chester
      Purpose. The aim is to investigate what relationships exist between resilience and mindfulness in undergraduate nurse training and how these might contribute to well-being. Design and Methods. One hundred and six students participated in this cross-sectional study. Multivariate and bivariate procedures were utilized to assess the differences between students' demographics, academic resilience and mindfulness. Findings. The findings suggested that acceptance and attention within mindfulness were important for resilience. Students who had higher levels of academic resilience also had higher indexes of mindfulness. Practice Implications. A key implication is that learning and practice areas should ensure that well-being, mindfulness and resilience literacy are key issues for students in training. This is at a time when mental health support and staff retention are foremost in policymakers’ minds.