• Being responsive to the needs of women who are being abused

      Steen, Mary; Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (English National Board for Nursing Midwifery and Health Visiting, 2001-07)
      One midwife's account of her work in setting up a training programme with the aim of raising midwives' awareness of the multi-complex issues relating to domestic violence, increasing their knowledge of possible indicators, and increase their confidence to ask questions, as well as documenting any causes for concern and providing useful information about local support agencies
    • Cervical cancer screening in Nepal: Ethical considerations

      Gyawali, Bishal; Keeling, June J.; van Teijlingen, Edwin; Dhakal, Liladhar; Aro, Arja R.; University of Southern Denmark ; University of Chester ; Bournemouth University ; Health for Life Project, Nepal ; University of Southern Denmark (DovePress, 2015-01-16)
      Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths for women worldwide. Cervical screening and early treatment can help to prevent cervical cancers. Cervical screening programs in Nepal are often associated with a number of socioeconomic, cultural, and ethical challenges. This paper discusses some central ethical challenges in providing cervical cancer screening in the Nepalese context and culture. It is necessary to address these challenges for successful implementation of such screening programs.
    • Health professionals’ responses to women’s disclosure of domestic violence

      Keeling, June J.; Fisher, Colleen; University of Chester ; University of Western Australia (SAGE, 2014-10-20)
      This study explored women’s experiences of their responses from health professionals following disclosure of domestic violence within a health setting. The existence of health based policies guiding professionals in the provision of appropriate support following disclosure of domestic violence is only effective if health professionals understand the dynamics of violent relationships. This paper focuses on the findings from the interviews conducted with fifteen women living in the UK who disclosed their experiences of domestic violence when accessing healthcare. Following thematic analysis, themes emerged that rotated around their disclosure and the responses they received from health professionals. The first two themes revealed the repudiation of, or recognition of and failure to act upon, domestic violence. A description of how the health professional’s behaviour became analogous with that of the perpetrator is discussed. The final theme illuminated women’s’ receipt of appropriate and sensitive support, leading to a positive trajectory away from a violent relationship. The findings suggest that the implicit understanding of the dynamics of violent relationships and the behaviours of the perpetrator of domestic violence are essential components of health care provision to avoid inadvertent inappropriate interactions with women.
    • Women’s narratives on their interactions with the first response police officer following an incidence of domestic violence in the UK

      Keeling, June J.; Van Wormer, Katherine; Taylor, Paul J.; University of Chester ; University of Iowa ; University of Chester (OMICS Group International, 2015-06)
      Historically police responses towards the treatment of domestic disturbances regard them as a noncriminal problem. Recent changes to societal and Criminal Justice System attitudes to domestic violence now places an emphasis on first response officers to effectively deal with offenders, manage victim safety and gather evidence. This study explored fifteen women’s interactions with the attending first response police officer following an episode of domestic violence within the home. A qualitative approach using unstructured narrative interviews was chosen to ensure that each woman remained in control of the research interview. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes concerning power relations and officer attitudes, suggesting that personal and cultural factors may negatively impact on officers’ handling of complaints of partner assault, offsetting policy initiatives that guide officers in engaging with victims of domestic violence. The order of the themes reflects the sequential nature of the women’s dialogue. The first theme explores the initial police response, followed by the women’s narratives around feelings of personal disregard for their experiences and evidential considerations. The final theme explores the police response to retraction of statements. Women’s interactions with first response officers following domestic violence illuminates societal issues previously unmentioned. Making womens’ stories visible provides an important insight, contribution and opportunity to examine first response officer’s responses to domestic violence. Integrating the voices of the women (service users) themselves, is arguably an advantageous consideration towards continuing professional development training for all first response police officers.