• Perspectives on supporting fathers affected by postnatal depression and a history of violence

      Keeling, June J.; Laws, Thomas; University of Chester; University of Salford (Mark Allen Healthcare, 2018-01-23)
      Intimate partner violence during the perinatal period is a significant public health problem that remains under-screened, under-diagnosed and under-treated. The establishment of evidence based guidelines to aid Health Visitors in providing provide support for couples experiencing violence has been hampered by the complex interplay between maternal and paternal mental health problems and violence. Our study explored the experiences of UK fathers voluntarily engaged with services designed to redeem their ideation to violence. The findings indicate that a tendency to violence was increased by stresses associated with the transition to parenthood. Men felt pressured by concerns for their partners' mental health, changes to their relationship with the mother, sleep disturbances and the burden of infant care they assumed when the mother could no longer cope. Health Visitors are ideally situated to assess for factors linked to the emergence of violence and pre-empt the support needed to minimise its occurrence.
    • Understanding violence when the perpetrator has an intellectual disability: The perceptions of professionals

      Lovell, Andy; Skellern, Joanne; University of Chester (SAGE, 2017-12-18)
      Aim: The research sought to enhance professional understanding of the violence perpetrated by some people with an intellectual disability. Background: The violent behaviour exhibited by some people with intellectual disabilities remains poorly understood, particularly with regard to a clear and informative definition. Design: A qualitative study investigating the views and perceptions of professionals working directly with people with an intellectual disability in different settings. Methods: 22 semi-structured interviews were undertaken with professionals from a variety of backgrounds and four themes were generated through data analysis. Findings: Themes produced comprised the degree of intellectual disability, impulsivity, intentionality and unpredictability. Findings indicated tension between understanding violence as purposeful and explaining it in relation to the intellectual disability and/or additional conditions. Conclusion: Intellectual disability is central to understanding the impact of the other three themes, though there is a professional reluctance to use such knowledge as evidence to inform practice.