• The issues affecting mental health nursing in Uganda

      Bailey, Jan; University of Chester (OMICS Group International, 2014-09-30)
      Estimates are that up to 35% of the Ugandan populations have a mental health condition; however access to psychiatric care, particularly for people living in rural areas, is poor. Additionally, cultural and lay beliefs and stigma affect both the individual with mental illness and healthcare professionals. The Ugandan government has recognized the need to modernize legislation and develop policies designed to provide modern psychiatric services to the whole population. Strategies include, passing new legislation, integrating services into primary care, including psychiatric illness in nurse education. Nevertheless, evidence suggests that this rhetoric is not being fully enacted. This paper reviews the issues affecting the development and delivery of improved mental health services, with a particular focus on psychiatric nursing. Actions that have already successfully addressed issues with psychiatric services in Uganda are highlighted and conclusions drawn regarding the development of future services.
    • Mentoring student nurses in Uganda: a phenomenological study of mentors’ perceptions of their own knowledge and skills.

      Mubeezi, Mary; Gidman, Janice; Uganda Nurses Council, University of Chester (Elsevier, 2017-07-29)
      This paper will report on the findings of a qualitative research study exploring mentorship in a rural hospital in Uganda. It explored how mentors perceived their roles and their own knowledge and skills in mentoring nurse students. Participants were confident in their ability to teach clinical skills, but they identified gaps in relation to the application of theory to these skills and they identified the need to update their own knowledge and to act more on their own initiative. The paper reports on the nature of the relationship between mentor and students, the teaching approaches used and the challenges of the role. Recommendations are proposed to develop a bespoke Ugandan curriculum to prepare mentors for their role, and to provide additional support, to enhance students’ experiences of learning in this context.