• Introduction

      Morris, Wayne; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2019-05-25)
      Fr Martin McAlinden was a Catholic priest from the Diocese of Dromore and Director of Pastoral Theology at St Patrick’s College Maynooth. Martin was studying for a doctorate at the University of Chester when, in 2016, he sadly died. His research had focussed on the spiritual malaise experienced by many priests in the Catholic Church in Ireland. In response, he developed a theology rooted in the ancient notion of Acedia and he used this as a way of talking about the spiritual crises many priests experience. The ancient response to Acedia, the command to stay in one’s cell and pray, provided Martin with a way of speaking about how this spiritual malaise might be transformed. This book brings together a major article that has emerged out of Martin’s research, together with a series of responses from many who accompanied him during his studies. It is offered to Martin’s brother priests, and to the whole Church, as a gift of love that might, it is hoped, contribute to the spiritual renewal of the Church.
    • Introduction (to Creaturely theology)

      Deane-Drummond, Celia; Clough, David; University of Chester (SCM Press, 2009-02-28)
      This book chapter introduces the edited book Creaturely theology: On God, humans and other animals. It discusses the term 'creaturely theology' - theology which is conscious of the theologian's own creatureliness and begins with the recognition of humans likeliness to others of God's creatures rather than differences between them.
    • Introduction (to Faith and force)

      Clough, David; Stiltner, Brian; St. John's College, University of Durham ; Sacred Heart University (Georgetown University Press, 2007-06-04)
      This introduction discusses the debate over war in a Christian context.
    • Introduction to Roots of Wisdom, Branches of Devotion: Plant Life in South Asian Traditions.

      Ferrari, Fabrizio M.; Dähnhardt, Thomas W. P.; University of Chester; Ca' Foscari University of Venice (Equinox Publishing, 2016-06-01)
      General introduction to the volume with an essay on the sentience of plants in South Asian traditions.
    • Introduction to Soulless Matter, Seats of Energy: Metals, Gems and Minerals in South Asian Traditions

      Ferrari, Fabrizio M.; Dähnhardt, Thomas W. P.; University of Chester; Ca' Foscari University of Venice (Equinox Publishing, 2016-10-03)
      General introduction to the volume with an essay on the debate on animate and inanimate matter in early Indian philosophical traditions.
    • Invitation to Research in Practical Theology

      Bennett, Zoe; Graham, Elaine L.; Pattison, Stephen; Walton, Heather; Anglia Ruskin University; University of Chester; University of Birmingham; University of Glasgow (Routledge, 2018-05-29)
      Practical theology as a subject area has grown and become more sophisticated in its methods and self-understanding over the last few decades. In doing so, it has become increasingly methodologically sophisticated and theoretically self-aware. This book provides a complete and original research primer in the major theories, approaches and methods at the cutting-edge of research in contemporary practical theology. It represents a reflection on the very practice of the discipline itself, its foundational questions and epistemological claims. Each chapter examines different aspects of the research process: starting with experience and practice, aspects of research design and epistemology, communities of learning, the influence of theological norms and tradition on the practice of research, and ethical considerations about what constitutes ‘the good’ in advanced research. It offers worked examples from the authors, their colleagues and research students that serve to illustrate key ideas and approaches in practical theological research.
    • Ireland

      Scharbrodt, Oliver; Montgomery, Victoria; University of Chester ; Queen’s University, Belfast (Brill, 2014-10-30)
      This article discusses the Muslim presence in Ireland.
    • Irenaeus and Augustine on the problem of evil reconsidered

      Greggs, Tom (Christian Theology Trust, 2004)
    • Is equal marriage an Anglican ideal?

      Henwood, Gillian; University of Chester (Cambridge University Press, 2014-12-01)
      A critical conversation between the Church of England's response to the Government's consultation on Equal Civil Marriage 2012, questions arising from professional parish practice as a priest, and literature in this area of research. The article explores the theological significance of 'equal marriage' (equal access to marriage and equality within marriage) as a Christian possibility within the Church of England, with contemporary approaches to gender and sexuality.
    • Is practical theology a form of ‘action research’?

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (de Gruyter, 2013-08-06)
      This journal articles examines in depth the claim that practical theology ought to be regarded as a form of action research. Action research is founded on the indivisibility of value and action: a conviction that knowledge, and research, cannot be dispassionate and that values are themselves iterated in the process of their implementation in practice. It insists on the inductive and contextual nature of knowledge and assumes that knowledge comes from human experience (albeit interpreted and codified through rational enquiry and analysis), rather than proceeding deductively from revealed truth.
    • "I’m Still Reading the Bible!” Post-Christian Women’s Biblical Reading Practices

      Llewellyn, Dawn; University of Chester
      In this chapter, I highlight post-Christian women’s biblicalism as a spiritual practice, while raising two questions for gendered religious reading practices and religious feminism’s uses and approaches to literature, which might also help explain why the activity of reading is underexplored. First, post-Christian women’s biblicalism crosses the distinction between sacred and secular literature sometimes assumed in religious feminism. In the search for alternative textual sources for doing theology, an either/or separation between sacred and secular has been presumed, which has not only set the Bible and women’s writing apart, but also reading practices and processes. Second, experience has been privileged in religious feminisms’ turn to literature as it seeks examples of women’s spiritual encounters; while in biblical feminism, women’s voices are the standpoint from which to examine scripture from a range of contextual positions. However, religious feminism has tended to focus on the text to the extent that actual readers are usually implied: everyday women’s experiences of reading have been passed over. Yet, by qualitatively interviewing post-Christian women readers to listen to their reading experiences, biblical reading emerges as a spiritual practice amongst women identifying against the Christian tradition. This troubles the assumption that women who use literature as a spiritual resource are doing so because they have found the Christian testaments lacking in opportunities to access the divine, and have therefore excluded them from their personal collections of spiritual texts. While post-Christian women readers in this study are critical of the Bible and question its relevancy, they continue to read it. I begin by briefly discussing the fieldwork upon which this chapter is based and my use of ‘post-Christian’. I then point to the sacred and secular textual distinctions that have occurred in religious feminisms, followed by discussing the preference for implied rather than actual readers to suggest that post-Christian women’s biblicalism is an unexpected aspect of women’s spiritual reading practices. Finally, using examples from the fieldwork, I illustrate one of the ways post-Christian women’s biblicalism emerges in this research, as the women employ ‘filtering’ strategies to monitor their acceptance and use of the biblical texts in their spiritual lives.
    • Jan-Olav Henriksen, Christianity as Distinct Practices: A Complicated Relationship (T&T Clark, 2019).

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester
      Review of Henriksen's book in which he argues that Christianity (and religion in general) has been perceived, both within the academy and society at large, as primarily an intellectual undertaking, whereas it should more properly be considered as ‘a cluster of practices that taken together manifest a distinct historically and contextually shaped mode of being in the world’. While Henriksen is not unique amongst contemporary scholars in regarding ‘religion as practice’ and ‘theology as practical’, it is his attempt to forge connections between the two and to pursue the logic of a philosophical reading of religion as practice through to a theological reading of the distinctive qualities of Christian practices that is of particular significance.
    • Jesus in an Age of Enlightenment: Radical Gospels from Thomas Hobbes to Thomas Jefferson. By Jonathan C.P Birch

      Greenaway, Jonathan; orcid: 0000-0001-5636-7707 (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2021-02-07)
    • Jesus in an age of enlightenment: Radical gospels from Thomas Hobbes to Thomas Jefferson. By Jonathan C.P Birch

      Greenaway, Jonathan; University of Chester
      A review of Jesus in an Age of Enlightenment: Radical Gospels from Thomas Hobbes to Thomas Jefferson by Jonathan C.P Birch
    • ‘Jesus is victor’: Passing the impasse of Barth on universalism

      Greggs, Tom; University of Cambridge (Cambridge University Press, 2007-04-20)
      This article examines the question of Karl Barth's stance on universalism.
    • Jews, Pagans, sceptics and emperors

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (2014-02-25)
      Far from becoming marginal to society, religion is returning to public prominence as a significant factor in global politics and civil society. Yet this is not a religious revival by any means, due to the enduring influence of a completely different social and cultural trajectory: of secularism and religious scepticism. We find ourselves between a ‘rock’ of religious resurgence – or at least its renewed visibility – and the ‘hard place’ of secularism. How do we negotiate the unprecedented co-existence of these two discourses? And in particular, how do people of faith give an account of their motivations and values in a world that is more sensitive than ever to religious belief and practice, yet often struggles to accommodate it into secular discourse? I intend to answer this by calling for a renewal of the practice of Christian apologetics: the task of offering a reasoned defence or rationale for one’s faith.
    • Judge for yourselves: Reading 1 Corinthians

      Evans, Robert; University College Chester (Darton, Longman & Todd, 2003-10-13)
      This book discusses the servant-sovereignity of Christ, Paul's role and status within his churches, questions of social status, the freedoms and authority of marriage partners, authority and equality in worship, women's freedom or constraints in worship, and slaves and the hierarchical household. There is also a case study in Paul's message and method.
    • Karl Barth on religious and irreligious idolatry

      Clough, David; University of Chester (T & T Clark, 2007-05-31)
    • Kleśas and Pretas: Therapy and Liberation in Buddhist Recovery from Addiction

      Dossett, Wendy; University of Chester (Equinox, 2020-04-24)
      This article offers an analysis of Buddhist approaches to addiction recovery in the terms of some of the key debates in addiction/recovery studies. Buddhist recovery teachings are analysed for the extent to which they embody models of addiction which construe the problem as a disease, as a moral problem, as a problem of powerlessness, as a problem of control, as a choice, as a social or a personal problem, and as continuous (or not) with putative saṃsāric experience. They are also analysed for the extent to which recovery is modelled as a change of identity or of practices, and how far “recovery ideals” align with Buddhist soteriology. The article exposes philosophical and epistemological diversity across Buddhist recovery pathways, and argues that the therapeutization of Buddhism (Metcalf 2002) is inadequate as a categorical frame.