• The Rabbi on the Train: Reflections on Forgiveness

      Vincent, Alana M.; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2015-10-02)
      This essay explores the theme of forgiveness in 20th century Jewish thought.
    • Rapture or risk: Signs of the end or symptoms of world risk society?

      Knowles, Steve; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2014-12-11)
      In this article I argue that elements of contemporary fundamentalist Christian apocalyptic discourse are not only influenced by, but are a product of the rhetoric and fascination with the notion of risk. The world risk society thesis developed by the German sociologist Ulrich Beck will be utilised as a conceptual framework to measure one example of an online discourse centred on a Christian dispensationalist understanding of the rapture: Rapture Index. This popular website utilises a statistical probability index system based on 45 different categories that relate to global socio-political events; the higher the aggregate total the nearer the rapture. The Rapture Index is indebted to the impact of risk in contemporary society and it is a tool that exemplifies non-knowing: a product of the world risk society.
    • The re-enchantment of the West: Volume II alternative spiritualities, sacralization, popular culture, and occulture

      Partridge, Christopher; University of Chester (T & T Clark, 2006-04-20)
      This book discusses alternative spiritual milieu in the contemporary Western world. It focuses upon wellbeing, eco-enchantment, psychedelics, cyberspirituality, the extraterrestrial,and contemporary Western demonology.
    • Reading, Feminism, Spirituality: Troubling the Waves

      Llewellyn, Dawn; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015-09-30)
      Through original interviews and research, Llewellyn uses spirituality to uncover new commonalities between the second and third feminist waves, and sacred and secular experiences. Her lively approach highlights the importance of reading cultures in feminist studies, connecting women's voices across generations, literary practices, and religions.
    • Receptions of Israelite nation-building: Modern Protestant natalism and Martin Luther

      McKeown, John P.; University of Chester (Wiley, 2010-06-14)
      This article evaluates the claim that Martin Luther was the forerunner of natalism, looking at his references to reproduction in a historical and theological context.
    • Reconceiving repentance

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (2007)
    • Reflection towards inclusion: Using reflection in work with young people

      Turner, Richard; University of Chester (T & T Clark, 2011-06-23)
      This chapter considers how the process of reflective practice can be applied to inclusive practice with young people.
    • Reflections on the Language of Salvation in Twelve-Step Recovery

      Dossett, Wendy; University of Chester (Bloomsbury, 2015-12-17)
      ‘In return for a bottle and a hangover we have been given the Keys to the Kingdom’ (The ‘Big Book’ Alcoholics Anonymous) Many who find recovery from alcoholism through the twelve steps speak implicitly or explicitly in terms of a salvific experience. Active alcoholism is experienced phenomenologically as a totally hopeless condition from which there is no escape; yet escape is made possible for millions by the discipline of the twelve steps and the support of twelve step mutual help groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous and/or treatment centres. For many, the profound transformation of recovery from a hopeless and terminal condition can be understood only by reference to a Higher Power, or even a transcendent being, and thus the experience is understood as ‘spiritual’ in nature. In a volume which interrogates and widens discourse about salvation, this chapter questions the utility of soteriological language in the context of addictions recovery. Is such language in this context descriptive, or normative? What are the risks in using it? Are new languages of release from addiction being developed? The chapter draws on some case studies from the Higher Power Project, a qualitative study of spirituality and recovery at the University of Chester to explore these questions.
    • Reflexivity and Rapprochement: Explorations of a ‘Postsecular’ Public Theology

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (Brill, 2017-10-19)
      Accounts of secularization, decline and marginalization in relation to the public position of religion in Western society have failed to account for the continued vitality and relevance of religion in the global public square. It is important, however, to challenge simplistic accounts and think of the new visibility of religion (not least in Europe) in terms of complexity and multi-dimensionality. This article will ask how public theology might contribute constructively to repairing our fractured body politic and promoting new models of citizenship and civic engagement around visions of the common good.
    • Religion, Devotion and Medicine in North India. The Healing Power of Sitala

      Ferrari, Fabrizio M.; University of Chester (Bloomsbury, 2014-11-20)
      This volume examines notions of health and illness in North Indian devotional culture, with particular attention paid to the worship of the goddess Sitala, the Cold Lady. Consistently portrayed in colonial and postcolonial literature as the ambiguous 'smallpox goddess', Sitala is here discussed as a protector of children and women, a portrayal that emerges from textual sources as well as material culture. The eradication of smallpox did not pose a threat to Sitala and her worship. She continues to be an extremely popular goddess. Religion, Devotion and Medicine in North India critically examines the rise and affirmation of the 'smallpox myth' in India and beyond, and explains how Indian narratives, ritual texts and devotional songs have celebrated Sitala as a loving mother who protects her children from the effects, and the fear, of poxes, fevers and infantile disorders but also all sorts of new threats (such as global pandemics, addictions and environmental catastrophes). The book explores a wide range of ritual and devotional practices, including scheduled festivals, songs, vows, pageants, austerities, possession, animal sacrifices and various forms of offering. Built on extensive fieldwork and a close textual analysis of sources in Sanskrit and vernacular languages (Hindi, Bhojpuri and Bengali) as well as on a rich bibliography on the struggle against smallpox in colonial and post-colonial India, the book reflects on the ambiguous nature of Sitala as a phenomenon largely dependent on the enduring fascination with the exotic, and the horrific, that has pervaded public renditions of Indian culture in indigenous fiction, colonial reports, medical literature and now global culture. To aid study, the volume includes images, web links, appendixes and a filmography.
    • Religion, Equalities and Inequalities

      Llewellyn, Dawn; Sharma, Sonya; University of Chester; University of Kingston (Routledge, 2016-08-03)
      Presenting cutting edge research on how religion can confront and obscure social inequalities in everyday life, Religion, Equalities and Inequalities argues that when religion is left out of social scientific analyses, it can result in incomplete analyses that conceal pathways to social inclusion and exclusion. Bringing together an international and interdisciplinary group of contributors who operate at the vanguard of theoretical and empirical work on how social structures of power, institutions and bodies can generate equalities and inequalities in religion, the collection shows how religion can enable and challenge the inequities that affect people’s everyday lives.
    • Religion, Spirituality and Addiction Recovery: Introduction

      Dossett, Wendy; Metcalf-White, Liam; University of Chester
      Religion, spirituality, non-religion, and the secular (Lee 2014, 2015) are unstable categories that are nonetheless routinely reified by academics, clinicians and practitioners alike, and positioned as fundamental to experiences of addiction recovery. For instance, addiction is often framed, dramatically, as a spiritual malady, yet, just as often, as simply a poor moral choice. While ideas associated with religion or spirituality play out differently in those contrasting diagnoses, the role of religion and spirituality in their aetiology is evident. We (Wendy Dossett and Liam Metcalf-White) argue that the categories of religion, spirituality, and non-religion, as they to relate to addiction recovery, need further analysis than they receive in the clinical literature. This literature frequently presents them as extra “technologies of the self ” (Foucault 1988); either functionally worthwhile or not (Szalavitz 2017); rather than as embedded in the very culture and discourses in which addiction and recovery are named and experienced. We argue for a focus on the latter as more productive for an understanding of the field.
    • Religionless Christianity and the political implications of theological speech: What Bonhoeffer’s theology yields to a world of fundamentalisms

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009-07)
      This article seeks to utilise Bonhoeffer’s religionless Christianity in a formative and constructive way to aid theological speech in the complexly secular and multi-faith setting of the twenty-first century. It will begin by seeking to highlight trends in unhelpful contemporary theo-politics, and to locate these in the interconnection of secular and religious forms of fundamentalism. It will then consider how a theological interpretation of Bonhoeffer’s religionless Christianity might assist in undermining such fundamentalisms. A further section identifies a three-fold positive benefit that Bonhoeffer’s thought offers in the contemporary situation: a distinction between God and religion; a genuine understanding of the sovereignty of God; and an inability to separate secular-religious concerns from inter-faith concerns.
    • Religionless Christianity in a complexly religious and secular world: Thinking through and beyond Bonhoeffer

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (Peter Lang, 2008-04-10)
      This book chapter aims to appropriate the inner-logics of Bonhoeffer's discussion of religionless in order to help reflect on the complex contemporary religious and secular situation in which religion is increasingly recognised as a geo-political concern.
    • Religious education in the secondary school: An introduction to teaching, learning and the world religions

      Holt, James D.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2014-12-01)
      Religious Education in the Secondary School is a comprehensive, straightforward introduction to the effective teaching of Religious Education in the secondary classroom. Acknowledging the highly valuable yet often misunderstood contribution of RE, this text shows how the subject can be taught in a way that explores the impact of religion on the lives of people and society, engaging pupils and preparing them to become individuals who celebrate and respect diversity. It is illustrated throughout with ideas for teaching at different key stages and offers expert chapters introducing you to both the World Religions and the core aspects of effective teaching and learning. With an emphasis on developing an understanding of the importance - and different ways - of meeting the learning needs of all pupils, key chapters cover: -Understanding different pedagogies of RE -Spirituality and RE -Tips on effective planning and assessment -An approach to teaching across the Key Stages -Core subject knowledge in Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism Written by an experienced teacher, teacher educator and examiner, Religious Education in the Secondary School is a succinct compendium and has a real classroom applicability offering all trainee RE teachers, as well as those teaching Religious Education as specialists or non-specialists a wealth of support and inspiration.
    • Remembering together: Commemoration in Northern Ireland

      Dunn, Jonathan; University of Chester; University of Manchester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-08-24)
      This chapter addresses the challenge of remembering conflict together in the context of a society still divided by “legacy issues”. Its focus is on the particular challenges presented by efforts to commemorate the conflict in the author’s native Northern Ireland. In light of this series’ theme of ‘living together after empire’, the task of commemoration is re-imagined as ‘co-memoration’; a public remembering which has the potential at least to include all elements within society. The author explores the possibilities and challenges posed by re-imagining commemoration as co-memoration, drawing on the insights of public theology and his own experience of Christian ministry in the context to do so. Objections and motivations which have hitherto represented barriers to co-memoration are reconsidered in light of historian Michael Ignatieff’s concept of ‘keeping faith with dead’. In doing so the author suggests that these deep-seated commitments, which have long been viewed in terms of assumed allegiances to national identities, must be understood as primarily personal loyalties owed to family, friends and community. The chapter then moves to assess the possibilities for co-memoration within Protestant places of worship in Northern Ireland, by considering issues which arise from the interaction of the personal and communal loyalties with physical symbols and liturgical practices. The conclusion considers the possibilities and challenges ahead and suggests the shape of the further research which is required in this area.
    • A remembrance of things (best) forgotten: The 'allegorical past' and the feminist imagination

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (Feminist Theology, 2012-08-21)
      This article discusses the US TV series Mad Men, which is set in an advertising agency in 1960s New York, in relation to two key elements which seem significant for a consideration of the current state of feminism in church and academy, both of which centre around what it means to remember or (not) to forget.