• Pagan fundamentalism?

      Partridge, Christopher; Chester College of Higher Education (Paternoster Press, 2002-12-01)
      This book chapter discusses embryonic fundamentalist tendencies within Paganism.
    • Participation for all?

      Gosling, Dot; University of Chester (T & T Clark, 2011-06-23)
      This chapter considers the importance of the full participation of young people within the Church of England and its benefits for the Church.
    • Patterns of Ministry of clergy married to clergy in the Church of England

      Collingridge, Susie; University of Chester (Cambridge University Press, 2014-11-04)
      This article argues that for good practice, wellbeing and fruitful ministry, decisions by and about clergy married to clergy (CMC) in the Church of England require a clear quantitative picture of their ministry, and offers such a picture in early 2013 drawn primarily from published data, compared with national Church of England statistics. Over 26% more clergy dyads were found than previously thought, with many active in ministry. A wide variety of ministry patterns were identified, including a higher than normal percentage in non-parochial roles, supporting previous research noting high levels of boundary enmeshment and absorptiveness. Considerable gender inequality prevailed in shared parochial settings in spite of women having been ordained priest for nearly 20 years, with very few wives holding more senior positions than their husbands, while female CMC are more likely to be dignitaries than other ordained women.
    • Paula Gooder, Body: Biblical Spirituality for the Whole Person

      Alexander, Loveday (SAGE Publications, 2017-02-23)
    • Perception of Spirituality among Substance Addicts with Incarceration Experience: A Phenomenological Study

      Ceylan, İsa; Metcalf-White, Liam (Association for Spiritual Psychology and Counseling, 2019-10-15)
      This paper examines the role of spirituality in a recovery context by drawing on qualitative research conducted at a residential recovery community in North Wales, United Kingdom. The study aimed to examine perceptions of spirituality among exprisoners and people identifying as in recovery from addiction. The researchers explored ideas of “spiritual coping” and “spiritual wellbeing” in terms of meaning, purpose, connectedness, forgiveness, and peace in addiction treatment programs influenced by 12-Step models, for instance, Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Also, this paper focuses on both spiritual counseling services shaped by pre-determined meanings and values and secondly, on individuals’ perceptions about spirituality through the language of desires, needs, and expectations. The data for this research produced from five semi-structured interviews with male individuals who had recovered from their addiction and had practised some custodial life. To discover the common context of different perceptions of the language spirituality, the data was coded by the first and second loop encodings from the data analysis methods used. The central schemes that appear as “Spirituality in Experiences, Spirituality in Values, Spirituality as Meaning/Purpose of Life, Spirituality as Attachment, Spirituality as Coping Mechanism” have been evaluated within the framework of the concept of spirituality. In the conclusion of this study, it was observed that spirituality was used as a coping mechanism for buffering the sensation of hopelessness and powerlessness often experienced by people in active addiction.
    • Peripatetic mystics: The renunciate order of the Terapanthi Jains

      Geaves, Ron; University College Chester (Paternoster Press, 2003-06-01)
    • Pessimistic universalism

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (2009-02)
    • Philosophy as an art of living/writing

      Leung, King-Ho (Taylor and Francis, 2015-06-23)
      Review essay of 'Philosophy, literature, and the dissolution of the subject: Nietzsche, Musil, Atay' by Zeynep Talay-Turner.
    • The Picture of Artificial Intelligence and the Secularization of Thought

      Leung, King-Ho; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2019-04-17)
      This article offers a critical interpretation of Artificial Intelligence (AI) as a philosophical notion which exemplifies a secular conception of thinking. One way in which AI notably differs from the conventional understanding of “thinking” is that, according to AI, “intelligence” or “thinking” does not necessarily require “life” as a precondition: that it is possible to have “thinking without life.” Building on Charles Taylor’s critical account of secularity as well as Hubert Dreyfus’ influential critique of AI, this article offers a theological analysis of AI’s “lifeless” picture of thinking in relation to the Augustinian conception of God as “Life itself.” Following this critical theological analysis, this article argues that AI’s notion of thinking promotes a societal privilege of certain rationalistic or calculative ways of thought over more existential or spiritual ways of thinking, and thereby fosters a secularization or de-spiritualization of thinking as an ethical human practice.
    • Playing chicken: Theology, economics, politics and ethics in the campaign for better conditions for poultry

      Clough, David; University of Chester (Methodist Publishing, 2008)
      This article discusses animal welfare and Christian ethics within the context of the campaign by celebrity chefs to encourage people to eat free range chicken.
    • Pluralising practical theology: international and multi-traditional challenges and opportunities

      Stuerzenhofecker, Katja; University of Chester; University of Manchester
      The entrance of international practical theologians of all faiths and none into the traditionally Western-centric, Christian-dominated field in the UK prompts the review of its scope and methodology. This paper argues for a shared conversation on how to achieve constructive and authentic participation for all. A recent survey of alumni from four UK-based Professional Doctorates in Practical Theology highlights omissions and opportunities, and points towards an agenda for intentional and effective pluralization. Evangelical principles and Christian liberation theology suggest internal strategies to counter possible resistance to undoing the Christian hegemony.
    • Post colonialism and religion: New spaces of 'belonging and becoming' in the postsecular city

      Baker, Chris; Beaumont, Justin; University of Chester ; University of Groningen (Continuum, 2011-06-16)
      This book chapter discusses the new religious dynamics that immigaration from the South has brought to the public and political life of the Western 'secular' city.
    • Post-critical and formative theology

      Greggs, Tom; Nimmo, Paul T.; University of Cambridge (2007-04)
    • Postmodernism: Reasons to be cheerful

      Knowles, Steve; University of Chester (T&T Clark, 2011-06-23)
      This chapter provides an analysis of the impact of postmodernism on the Christian faith and theology.
    • Praise by animals in the Hebrew Bible

      Atkins, Peter Joshua; University of Chester
      Among ancient Near Eastern societies was a widespread and particularly intriguing belief that animals were able to worship and praise deities. This study shows the Hebrew Bible evidences the idea that animals were capable of praising God too and proceeds to observe and document the presence of numerous examples of this in specific biblical texts. Through understanding the place of animals in the Hebrew Bible, and their perceived activity in the ancient Near East, this study suggests animals are distinct agents of praise in their own right in the biblical texts.
    • Prayer with pain: Ceremonial suffering among the Mi'kmaq

      Owen, Suzanne; University of Chester/Leeds Trinity University (State University of New York Press, 2013-10-01)
      There are many ways to pray amongst Native American and First Nations, but considered the most ‘powerful’ are those that involve an element of physical suffering that can be regarded as gifts to ‘spirit’ and understood in the context that when something is asked for – visions, healing, etc. – then something must be given in exchange in order to restore the balance and promote respectful relationships. Prayer with pain in a ceremonial context, linking the individual to community, transforms personal suffering into empowerment gained through a shared healing experience.
    • ‘Preconditions’: The Upanisā Sutta in Context

      Jones, Dhivan Thomas; University of Chester
      The Upanisā Sutta (Saṃyutta Nikāya 12: 23) has been interpreted as presenting an overarching account of conditionality, joining the twelve nidānas of paṭicca-samuppāda with a further series of positive factors (upanisās) leading to awakening. The discourse has a parallel preserved in Chinese translation. A close reading of these versions shows how the series of upanisās belongs to a ‘family’ of upanisā discourses. The connection of the series to the twelve nidānas appears rhetorical rather than doctrinal. The concept of upanisā in Pāli literature is related to the concept of upaniṣad in Vedic literature, and upanisā was also a topic of debate in the ascetic milieu of ancient India. The Buddhist concept of upanisā emerges as that of a supportive inner state that is a necessary condition for achieving the aim of liberation. I propose to translate upanisā as ‘precondition’.
    • The problem with human equality: Towards a non-exclusive account of the moral value of creatures in the company of Martha Nussbaum

      Clough, David; University of Chester (T & T Clark, 2011-06-23)
      This book chapter discusses human equality.
    • Professors of Religion and their Strange Wives: Diluvian Discord in the Eyes of Matthew Henry

      Collins, Matthew A.; University of Chester (T&T Clark, 2019-05-30)
      The summer of 2014 marked the tercentenary of the death of Matthew Henry (1662–1714), a leading figure among early eighteenth-century Dissenters and author of the six-volume Exposition of the Old and New Testaments (1707–1714/25). This monumental work, which by 1855 had already been published in twenty-five different editions, attempted a peculiarly practical approach to the biblical text and continues to be widely used and readily accessible even today in both print and online versions. The theme of foreign (or ‘strange’) wives and Israelite intermarriage is one which occurs throughout the Hebrew Bible and, accordingly, throughout Matthew Henry’s commentary upon it. Where it appears, the practice of intermarriage is characterized by Henry as (at best) unwise and (at worst) a very real threat to both social and religious cohesion. This essay explores how Henry deals with the issue of ‘strange wives’, why he believes they continue to pose a threat, and (in view of the overall intention of his commentary) what ‘practical observations’ he offers to his reader as a result. In doing so it is argued that Henry’s commentary traces a thematic thread from the ante-diluvian age to the post-exilic period of calamities resulting from mixed marriages between ‘professors of religion’ and their ‘strange wives’.
    • Promoting the Good: Ethical and Methodological Considerations in Practical Theological Research.

      Graham, Elaine L.; Llewellyn, Dawn; University of Chester (SCM Press, 2018-09-28)
      In this chapter, we draw on our experiences as supervisors on a Professional Doctorate in Practical Theology (DProf) at the University of Chester, UK, to reflect on the ethical dimensions of undertaking research in this field of study. Using three case-studies, based on our students’ work, we examine how the ethical challenges they have navigated and addressed – using a range of methods -- offer examples of the ways practical theological research can trouble and speak back to well-established practices. First, we contextualize the Professional Doctorate in practical theology and introduce the idea of the ‘researching professional’, before suggesting that although practical theology is a broad discipline, it aims to transform the researcher’s practice, their institution, and the academy. The chapter then moves to outline the part that qualitative methodologies play in the discipline and focus on its forms of research as implicated and therefore ethical project. Finally, we discuss three illustrations of recent doctoral work in practical theology that raise issues of consent, privacy, anonymity, and avoiding harm. In particular, we draw out that these examples point towards ways that qualitative research strives towards ‘the good’.