• Legitimizing and necessitating inter-faith dialogue: The dynamics of inter-faith for individual faith communities

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (Brill, 2010)
      In an age in which religion is a burning issue in the geo-political sphere, the need for peoples of different religions to engage in inter-faith dialogue may seem clear; what is less clear is whether there is legitimacy for and imperative to members of individual faith communities to engage with the religious other on the exclusive grounds of their individual faith. This article thus seeks to advocate that theology done in the service of individual faiths needs as a priority to engage in legitimizing and necessitating dialogue with the religious other as the religious other. The article considers the grounds on which exclusivist religious people can undertake inter-faith dialogue. Looking to the need to attend to particularity and the genuine otherness of the religious other, the article advocates that faiths should begin to understand what it is internal to their traditions that makes inter-faith dialogue a necessity for intense and particular religious self-identity. Members of faith communities need to be legitimated on terms internal to their community and by leaders of their community to engage in dialogue with the other: they need to know not only how to engage with the other but also why to engage with the other. Considering the particular tradition of Christianity, the article attends to these themes by seeking hints from scripture and Christ regarding why a Christian should engage with the religious other in order to be more intensely Christian.
    • Levi (Son of Alphaeus)

      Middleton, Paul; The University of Chester (De Gruyter, 2018-12-07)
      A dictionary entry on Levi (son of Alphaeus)
    • Liberalism versus Postliberalism. The Great Divide in Twentieth Century Theology. By John Allan Knight

      Fulford, Ben; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2014-02-21)
      Book review.
    • Living Paradoxes: On Agamben, Taylor and human subjectivity

      Leung, King-Ho (Telos, 2019-06-17)
      Over the last two decades, Giorgio Agamben and Charles Taylor have produced important and influential genealogical works on the philosophical and political conceptions of secularity. Yet in their recent work, both of these thinkers have respectively returned to a prominent theme in their earlier works: Human life. This essay offers a parallel reading of Agamben and Taylor as post-Heideggerian critics of the modern conception of human subjectivity. Through examining these their respective characterizations of modern subjectivity — namely Taylor’s account of the “disengaged self” and Agamben’s conception of the “excluded-included” bare life, this essay seeks to highlight not only the Heideggerian currents underlying the philosophical anthropologies of Agamben and Taylor, but also the ontological paradoxicalities they detect in the conception of human existence and subjectivity in politico-philosophical modernity. After reviewing the different aspects of Agamben’s and Taylor’s critiques of modern subjectivity as well as the traditional metaphysical conception of humans as “language animals”, this essay concludes by sketching a robust and affirmative “paradoxical” conception of human beings as “language animals” which simultaneously takes into account the insights from Taylor’s (post)analytic philosophical renewal of Aristotelianism and Agamben’s critical analysis of contemporary biopolitics in the continental philosophical tradition.
    • The Lord of all: Rediscovering the Christian doctrine of providence for the world

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (2011-06-23)
      This book chapter discusses the Christian doctrine of providence and suggests that a deeper understanding of this will lead to a greater appreciation of the universality of God's grace. This is discussed within the context of the work of Karl Barth.
    • Loss of the Bible and the Bible in Lost: Biblical Literacy and Mainstream Television

      Collins, Matthew A.; University of Chester (T&T Clark, 2015-02-26)
      Recent well-publicised efforts to encourage biblical literacy have emerged as a direct response to its perceived ‘decline’. The assumed (or feared) gradual ‘loss’ of the Bible to modern society at large has given rise to a renewed determination in some quarters to ensure an ongoing engagement and familiarity with what ex-Poet Laureate Sir Andrew Motion calls ‘an essential piece of cultural luggage’. The present examination addresses the question of biblical literacy from the perspective of mainstream television, problematising a straightforward assumption of its decline. Focusing on the popular U.S. television series Lost (2004–2010, ABC), it highlights the surprising prominence of biblical allusion (both implicit and explicit) throughout. This in turn raises questions about biblical literacy among the writers and, more crucially, the extent to which biblical literacy is assumed (or not) on the part of the audience. This examination, however, goes one step further by suggesting that, since the very nature of the programme deliberately encourages a close attention to detail on the part of its viewers and (over-)analysis of what is seen and heard, it may be that, whether or not Lost assumes continued familiarity with the biblical text, it would intriguingly appear to play a (perhaps unintentional) part in actively encouraging and promoting it.
    • Lot’s Daughters (DBWC)

      Collins, Matthew A.; University of Chester (Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2012-10-22)
      Dictionary article on Lot's daughters for the Dictionary of the Bible and Western Culture.
    • Luther’s Legacy: Rethinking the Theology of Lay Discipleship 500 Years after the Reformation

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (Brill, 2017-09-23)
      The 500th anniversary of the Protestant reformation is significant in many respects, not least in providing an opportunity to revisit Luther's emphasis on the role of the laity. Yet such a positive and robust understanding of vocation as secular and worldly, as well as ecclesial, has informed understandings of lay ministry only sporadically, as they have often been submerged by clericalism and institutional inertia. By revisiting the hey-day of modern theologies of the laity from the mid-twentieth century, and in dialogue with a recent Church of England report, this article will suggest some ways in which contemporary theological reflection on lay ministry as the vanguard of the missio Dei and the work of the Church in the world might be promoted. A focus on a learning church, education for discernment and a worldly, missional ecclesiology will hold the Church to its essential vision of an empowered laity.
    • Making a world of difference: Christian reflections on disability

      McCloughry, Roy; Morris, Wayne (SPCK, 2002-06-21)
      This book discusses disability and Christian faith.
    • Manifestations of the post-secular emerging within discourses of posthumanism

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (2013-07-07)
      This paper discusses the concepts of posthuman and post-secular in critical theory.
    • The many names of Christ in wisdom: Reading Scripture with Origen for a diverse world

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (2008-07)
      This article discusses Origen's belief that the the plurality of names and titles of Christ demonstrates that one should recognise that the full diversity of the world must be taken seriously within God's plan of salvation: the universality of the One who will be "all in all" is not such that it destroys particularity; rather it is a universality which is brought about through a recognition of God's willingness to be involved in the various particularities of creation through the person and work of his Son. The article seeks to outline Origen's teaching on the many titles (or epinoiai) of Christ in Scripture, and then apply this teaching to contemporary theological concerns.
    • Mapping Shia Muslim Communities in Europe

      Shanneik, Yafa; Heinhold, Chris; Ali, Zahra (Brill, 2017-12-04)
      Abstract This article provides an introduction to the special issue on Mapping Shia Muslim Communities in Europe.1 With six empirically rich case studies on Shia Muslim communities in various European countries, this issue intends: first, to illustrate the historical developments and emergence of the Shia presence in Europe; second, to highlight the local particularities of the various Shia communities within each nation state and demonstrate their transnational links; and third, to provide for the first time an empirical comparative study on the increasingly visible presence of Shia communities in Europe that fills an important gap in research on Muslims in Europe.
    • Martyrdom

      Middleton, Paul; University of Wales, Trinity Saint David (Cambridge University Press, 2014-03-06)
      Dictionary article on martyrdom in Christianity
    • Martyrdom

      Middleton, Paul; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-05-23)
      An overview of martyrdom in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam
    • Maternal Silences: Motherhood and Voluntary Childlessness in Christianity

      Llewellyn, Dawn; University of Chester (Brill, 2016-06-20)
      In Christianity, there is an ideology of motherhood that pervades scripture, ritual, and doctrine, yet there is an academic silence that means relatively little space has been given to motherhood and mothering, and even less to voluntary childlessness, from a faith perspective. By drawing on qualitative in-depth interviews with Christian women living in Britain, narrating their experiences of motherhood and voluntary childlessness, I suggest there are also lived maternal silences encountered by women in contemporary Christianity. There is a maternal expectation produced through church teaching, liturgy and culture that constructs women as ‘maternal bodies’ (Gatrell 2008); this silences and marginalises women from articulating their complex relationship with religion, motherhood, and childlessness in ways that challenge their spiritual development. However, this article also introduces the everyday and intentional tactics women employ to disrupt the maternal expectation, and hereby interrupt the maternal silence.
    • Matthew Henry: The Bible, Prayer, and Piety– A Tercentenary Celebration

      Collins, Matthew A.; Middleton, Paul; University of Chester; University of Chester (T&T Clark, 2019-05-30)
      Three hundred years after his death, Matthew Henry (1662–1714) remains arguably the best known expositor of the Bible in English, due to his six-volume Exposition of the Old and New Testaments. However, Henry’s famous commentary is by no means the only expression of his engagement with the Scriptures. His many sermons and works on Christian piety — including the still popular Method for Prayer — are saturated with his peculiarly practical approach to the Bible. To mark the tercentenary of Henry’s death, Matthew A. Collins and Paul Middleton have brought together notable historians, theologians, and biblical scholars to celebrate his life and legacy. Representing the first serious examination of Henry’s body of work and approach to the Bible, Matthew Henry: The Bible, Prayer, and Piety opens a scholarly conversation on Matthew Henry’s place in the eighteenth-century nonconformist movement, his contribution to the interpretation of the Bible, and his continued legacy in evangelical piety.
    • Micah, Pesher of (ESTJ)

      Collins, Matthew A.; University of Chester
      Encyclopaedia article on the Pesher of Micah.
    • Moderating Religious Identity and the Eclipse of Religious Wisdoms: Lessons from Hans Frei

      Fulford, Ben; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2017-06-16)
      The multivalent binary distinction between radical and moderate religion plays a key part in the rhetoric and strategy of European governments in their attempts to produce European Muslim citizens whose primary political loyalty lies with the society and state in which they live. It also plays a key part in public discourse about European Muslims and their citizenship. In what follows, I focus especially on one relatively constructive use of the distinction in the UK, offer an account of its logic through a reading of the political theology of John Locke and a critique of its effects upon a religious tradition that draws on the analysis of Hans W. Frei. Frei’s account suggests that to the extent that this logic has shaped Christian self-understanding, it tends to eclipse the wellsprings of the critically constructive engagement of Christians in the public sphere and public institutions constitutive of a pluralist, democratic society. This assessment in turn raises questions about the impact of the moderate/radical binary in respect of sources of constructive critical engagement by citizens with other religious identities.