• Jan-Olav Henriksen, Christianity as Distinct Practices: A Complicated Relationship (T&T Clark, 2019).

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester
      Review of Henriksen's book in which he argues that Christianity (and religion in general) has been perceived, both within the academy and society at large, as primarily an intellectual undertaking, whereas it should more properly be considered as ‘a cluster of practices that taken together manifest a distinct historically and contextually shaped mode of being in the world’. While Henriksen is not unique amongst contemporary scholars in regarding ‘religion as practice’ and ‘theology as practical’, it is his attempt to forge connections between the two and to pursue the logic of a philosophical reading of religion as practice through to a theological reading of the distinctive qualities of Christian practices that is of particular significance.
    • ‘Jesus is victor’: Passing the impasse of Barth on universalism

      Greggs, Tom; University of Cambridge (Cambridge University Press, 2007-04-20)
      This article examines the question of Karl Barth's stance on universalism.
    • Jews, Pagans, sceptics and emperors

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (2014-02-25)
      Far from becoming marginal to society, religion is returning to public prominence as a significant factor in global politics and civil society. Yet this is not a religious revival by any means, due to the enduring influence of a completely different social and cultural trajectory: of secularism and religious scepticism. We find ourselves between a ‘rock’ of religious resurgence – or at least its renewed visibility – and the ‘hard place’ of secularism. How do we negotiate the unprecedented co-existence of these two discourses? And in particular, how do people of faith give an account of their motivations and values in a world that is more sensitive than ever to religious belief and practice, yet often struggles to accommodate it into secular discourse? I intend to answer this by calling for a renewal of the practice of Christian apologetics: the task of offering a reasoned defence or rationale for one’s faith.
    • Judge for yourselves: Reading 1 Corinthians

      Evans, Robert; University College Chester (Darton, Longman & Todd, 2003-10-13)
      This book discusses the servant-sovereignity of Christ, Paul's role and status within his churches, questions of social status, the freedoms and authority of marriage partners, authority and equality in worship, women's freedom or constraints in worship, and slaves and the hierarchical household. There is also a case study in Paul's message and method.
    • Karl Barth on religious and irreligious idolatry

      Clough, David; University of Chester (T & T Clark, 2007-05-31)
    • Kleśas and Pretas: Therapy and Liberation in Buddhist Recovery from Addiction

      Dossett, Wendy; University of Chester
      This article offers an analysis of Buddhist approaches to addiction recovery in the terms of some of the key debates in addiction/recovery studies. Buddhist recovery teachings are analysed for the extent to which they embody models of addiction which construe the problem as a disease, as a moral problem, as a problem of powerlessness, as a problem of control, as a choice, as a social or a personal problem, and as continuous (or not) with putative saṃsāric experience. They are also analysed for the extent to which recovery is modelled as a change of identity or of practices, and how far “recovery ideals” align with Buddhist soteriology. The article exposes philosophical and epistemological diversity across Buddhist recovery pathways, and argues that the therapeutization of Buddhism (Metcalf 2002) is inadequate as a categorical frame.
    • Legitimizing and necessitating inter-faith dialogue: The dynamics of inter-faith for individual faith communities

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (Brill, 2010)
      In an age in which religion is a burning issue in the geo-political sphere, the need for peoples of different religions to engage in inter-faith dialogue may seem clear; what is less clear is whether there is legitimacy for and imperative to members of individual faith communities to engage with the religious other on the exclusive grounds of their individual faith. This article thus seeks to advocate that theology done in the service of individual faiths needs as a priority to engage in legitimizing and necessitating dialogue with the religious other as the religious other. The article considers the grounds on which exclusivist religious people can undertake inter-faith dialogue. Looking to the need to attend to particularity and the genuine otherness of the religious other, the article advocates that faiths should begin to understand what it is internal to their traditions that makes inter-faith dialogue a necessity for intense and particular religious self-identity. Members of faith communities need to be legitimated on terms internal to their community and by leaders of their community to engage in dialogue with the other: they need to know not only how to engage with the other but also why to engage with the other. Considering the particular tradition of Christianity, the article attends to these themes by seeking hints from scripture and Christ regarding why a Christian should engage with the religious other in order to be more intensely Christian.
    • Levi (Son of Alphaeus)

      Middleton, Paul; The University of Chester (De Gruyter, 2018-12-07)
      A dictionary entry on Levi (son of Alphaeus)
    • Liberalism versus Postliberalism. The Great Divide in Twentieth Century Theology. By John Allan Knight

      Fulford, Ben; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2014-02-21)
      Book review.
    • Living Paradoxes: On Agamben, Taylor and human subjectivity

      Leung, King-Ho (Telos, 2019-06-17)
      Over the last two decades, Giorgio Agamben and Charles Taylor have produced important and influential genealogical works on the philosophical and political conceptions of secularity. Yet in their recent work, both of these thinkers have respectively returned to a prominent theme in their earlier works: Human life. This essay offers a parallel reading of Agamben and Taylor as post-Heideggerian critics of the modern conception of human subjectivity. Through examining these their respective characterizations of modern subjectivity — namely Taylor’s account of the “disengaged self” and Agamben’s conception of the “excluded-included” bare life, this essay seeks to highlight not only the Heideggerian currents underlying the philosophical anthropologies of Agamben and Taylor, but also the ontological paradoxicalities they detect in the conception of human existence and subjectivity in politico-philosophical modernity. After reviewing the different aspects of Agamben’s and Taylor’s critiques of modern subjectivity as well as the traditional metaphysical conception of humans as “language animals”, this essay concludes by sketching a robust and affirmative “paradoxical” conception of human beings as “language animals” which simultaneously takes into account the insights from Taylor’s (post)analytic philosophical renewal of Aristotelianism and Agamben’s critical analysis of contemporary biopolitics in the continental philosophical tradition.
    • The Lord of all: Rediscovering the Christian doctrine of providence for the world

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (2011-06-23)
      This book chapter discusses the Christian doctrine of providence and suggests that a deeper understanding of this will lead to a greater appreciation of the universality of God's grace. This is discussed within the context of the work of Karl Barth.
    • Loss of the Bible and the Bible in Lost: Biblical Literacy and Mainstream Television

      Collins, Matthew A.; University of Chester (T&T Clark, 2015-02-26)
      Recent well-publicised efforts to encourage biblical literacy have emerged as a direct response to its perceived ‘decline’. The assumed (or feared) gradual ‘loss’ of the Bible to modern society at large has given rise to a renewed determination in some quarters to ensure an ongoing engagement and familiarity with what ex-Poet Laureate Sir Andrew Motion calls ‘an essential piece of cultural luggage’. The present examination addresses the question of biblical literacy from the perspective of mainstream television, problematising a straightforward assumption of its decline. Focusing on the popular U.S. television series Lost (2004–2010, ABC), it highlights the surprising prominence of biblical allusion (both implicit and explicit) throughout. This in turn raises questions about biblical literacy among the writers and, more crucially, the extent to which biblical literacy is assumed (or not) on the part of the audience. This examination, however, goes one step further by suggesting that, since the very nature of the programme deliberately encourages a close attention to detail on the part of its viewers and (over-)analysis of what is seen and heard, it may be that, whether or not Lost assumes continued familiarity with the biblical text, it would intriguingly appear to play a (perhaps unintentional) part in actively encouraging and promoting it.
    • Lot’s Daughters (DBWC)

      Collins, Matthew A.; University of Chester (Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2012-10-22)
      Dictionary article on Lot's daughters for the Dictionary of the Bible and Western Culture.
    • Luther’s Legacy: Rethinking the Theology of Lay Discipleship 500 Years after the Reformation

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (Brill, 2017-09-23)
      The 500th anniversary of the Protestant reformation is significant in many respects, not least in providing an opportunity to revisit Luther's emphasis on the role of the laity. Yet such a positive and robust understanding of vocation as secular and worldly, as well as ecclesial, has informed understandings of lay ministry only sporadically, as they have often been submerged by clericalism and institutional inertia. By revisiting the hey-day of modern theologies of the laity from the mid-twentieth century, and in dialogue with a recent Church of England report, this article will suggest some ways in which contemporary theological reflection on lay ministry as the vanguard of the missio Dei and the work of the Church in the world might be promoted. A focus on a learning church, education for discernment and a worldly, missional ecclesiology will hold the Church to its essential vision of an empowered laity.
    • Making a world of difference: Christian reflections on disability

      McCloughry, Roy; Morris, Wayne (SPCK, 2002-06-21)
      This book discusses disability and Christian faith.
    • Manifestations of the post-secular emerging within discourses of posthumanism

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (2013-07-07)
      This paper discusses the concepts of posthuman and post-secular in critical theory.
    • The many names of Christ in wisdom: Reading Scripture with Origen for a diverse world

      Greggs, Tom; University of Chester (2008-07)
      This article discusses Origen's belief that the the plurality of names and titles of Christ demonstrates that one should recognise that the full diversity of the world must be taken seriously within God's plan of salvation: the universality of the One who will be "all in all" is not such that it destroys particularity; rather it is a universality which is brought about through a recognition of God's willingness to be involved in the various particularities of creation through the person and work of his Son. The article seeks to outline Origen's teaching on the many titles (or epinoiai) of Christ in Scripture, and then apply this teaching to contemporary theological concerns.
    • Mapping Shia Muslim Communities in Europe

      Shanneik, Yafa; Heinhold, Chris; Ali, Zahra (Brill, 2017-12-04)
      Abstract This article provides an introduction to the special issue on Mapping Shia Muslim Communities in Europe.1 With six empirically rich case studies on Shia Muslim communities in various European countries, this issue intends: first, to illustrate the historical developments and emergence of the Shia presence in Europe; second, to highlight the local particularities of the various Shia communities within each nation state and demonstrate their transnational links; and third, to provide for the first time an empirical comparative study on the increasingly visible presence of Shia communities in Europe that fills an important gap in research on Muslims in Europe.