• A handbook in theology and ecology

      Deane-Drummond, Celia; Chester College of Higher Education (SCM Press, 1996-05-01)
      This book discusses Christian theology and environmental concerns. It focuses on practical issues of environmental concern, ecology and Bibical studies, ecology and Celtic Christianity, women and ecology, ecology and ethics, ecology and liturgy, ecology and Gaia, ecology and politics, and future directives for an ecological theology.
    • Hans Frei: beyond liberal and conservative

      Fulford, Ben; University of Chester (Wipf and Stock, 2020-04-30)
      At first glance, Hans W. Frei does not fit the profile of an ecumenical theologian, nor does he seem to have been considered in these terms before in scholarship. Unlike his colleague, George Lindbeck, he does not appear to have taken a close interest in the ecumenical movement or particular ecumenical dialogues or reconciliation, as Lindbeck did in his The Nature of Doctrine. Nor is his work seek to mediate between Anglican and Quaker beliefs. Yet he did seek a way forward, theologically, for what he called a ‘generous orthodoxy’ in an approach that would transcend and re-frame the conservative-liberal polarity and offer an approach to orthodoxy that was at once flexible, accountable to Scripture, resilient and progressive.
    • Health, wealth or wisdom? Religion and the paradox of prosperity

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (Brill, 2009-01-01)
      This article discusses the role of religious values and participation in the 'happiness hypothesis'.
    • The hermeneutical dynamics of 'reading Luke' as interpretation, reflection and formation

      Thiselton, Anthony; University of Chester (Paternoster Press, 2005)
      This book chapter discusses developments in the hermeneutical interpreation of the Book of Luke in the New Testament.
    • The hermeneutics of doctrine

      Thiselton, Anthony; University of Chester (William B Eerdmans, 2007-12-21)
      This book discusses the interface between hermeneutics and Christian doctrine.
    • Hinduism and Healing

      Ferrari, Fabrizio M.; University of Chester (SAGE, 2016-02-16)
      The chapter is divided into sections exploring medical knowledge, myths, and rituals in Veda, Āyurveda, Tantra, and in folk and devotional culture.
    • How might a virtue ethic frame debates in human genetics?

      Deane-Drummond, Celia; University College Chester (T & T Clark, 2003-11-01)
      This article discusses differing approaches to ethical debates in order to arrive at an ethical position on human genetics debates. The approach advocated is based on virtue ethics, theologically based on prudence, justice, fortitude and temperence, and through wisdom on faith, hope, and charity.
    • How to respect other animals: lessons for theology from Peter Singer, and vice versa

      Clough, David; University of Chester (Cambridge University Press, 2016-10-31)
      This chapter argues that Peter Singer's critiques of Christian attitudes towards animals need correction, that Christianity has something to learn from his utilitarian approach to animal ethics, but that a Christian understanding of animals addresses some deficiencies in a utilitarian animal ethics.
    • How to speak of God? Toward a postsecular apologetics

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2018-04-11)
      Against most expectations religion has not vanished from Western culture. If anything, it exercises a greater fascination than ever before. Broadly, we might think of ourselves as occupying a new, 'postsecular' space between a renewed visibility of religion in public life, and a corresponding acknowledgement of the importance of religious values and actors; and persistent and widespread disillusion and scepticism towards religion, and objections to religion as a source of legitimate public discourse. In a world that is more sensitive than ever to religious belief and practice, yet often struggles to accommodate it into secular discourse, how do religious institutions justify their position in a contested and volatile public square? This article argues that the contemporary postsecular context requires a recovery of the ancient practices of Christian apologetics as a form of public, theological witness to the practical value of faith, articulated in both deed and word.
    • “Illness Is Nothing But Injustice”: The Revolutionary Element in Bengali Folk Healing

      Ferrari, Fabrizio M.; University of Chester (American Folklore Society, 2015)
      This article seeks to reflect on how concepts such as “ritual,” “illness,” and “health” are intertwined in the practice of Bengali healers and their customers. By objecting to past and present logics that ascribe to folk healing an innate subalternity because of context (e.g., the village), mode of transmission (e.g., orality), gender and social background of votaries (e.g., low-caste, working-class sectors), my analysis discusses health-seeking rituals as an arena for revolutionary negotiations. This character is determined by the willingness of healers, health-seekers, and other-than-human entities (deities, spirits, demons, ghosts, etc.) to counter relative injustice, negotiate power, and actualize redemption by means of a radical, though often temporary, subversion of or challenge to an established order. This reading, which I derive from Ernesto de Martino’s “progressive folklore,” wishes to contribute to discourses on religious folklore as a way of expressing, and perpetuating acceptable solutions to individual and social imbalance, including the perception of illness as uneven development. Folk healing is one of the liveliest forms of people’s knowledge; the actualization of ancestral needs; and one of the most easily available and culturally understandable form of creativity, reflexivity, and education. While critically addressing the limits of using de Martino’s theories in the frame of post-colonial ethnography, I go back to his definition of culture as the result of the “victorious struggle of health over the pitfalls of disease” ([1958] 2000:25) and discuss illness and its treatment among Bengali healers and their clients as ways to experience what de Martino called the expansion of self-consciousness.
    • The illustrated encyclopedia of Islam

      Phillips, Charles; Seddon, Mohammed; Bokhari, Raana; University of Chester (Seddon) (Lorenz Books, 2010-03-24)
      This book discusses the Islamic faith, its history, philosophy and religious practices.
    • Imitation and finitude: Towards a Jewish theology of making

      Vincent, Alana M.; University of Chester (Mohr Siebeck, 2015-03-01)
      It has long been taken as a truism that Judaism as a whole is marked by a pervasive “hostility to the image”. The prevailing narrative takes the Second Commandment very much at face value, as a prohibition against the attempt to imitate anything in the heavens above, on the earth below, or in the waters under the earth. However, this narrative is based on an incomplete understanding of the textual and artefact record. This paper takes more recent scholarship into account, and attempts to contest this narrative, and to suggest that we can identify a Jewish tradition not just of visuality, but of art, and that, further, we can get there with the help of, rather than in spite of, the biblical text. It engages with a reading of the last third of the book of Exodus, weighing the duelling narratives of Bezalel and the Golden Calf against the theories of art which have risen to prominence in the modern era, attempting to formulate the basis for a Jewish theological aesthetics which affirms and embraces the visual arts.
    • The Inalienable Alien: Giorgio Agamben and the Political Ontology of Hong Kong

      Leung, King-Ho (Taylor and Francis, 2017-04-03)
      Drawing on the work of Giorgio Agamben, this article offers a philosophical interpretation of Hong Kong’s recent Umbrella Movement and the city’s political identity since its 1997 handover to China. With the constitutional principle of ‘one country, two systems’ it has held since 1997, Hong Kong has existed as an ‘inalienable alien’ part of China not dissimilar to that of Agamben’s political ontology of the homo sacer’s ‘inclusive exclusion’ in the polis. In addition to highlighting how Agamben’s politico-ontological notions such as ‘exception’ and ‘inclusive exclusion’ can illuminate the events of the Umbrella Movement, this article focuses particularly on the figure of the student, which many have seen as the symbolic face of the protest campaign. Considering how the student may also be regarded as a figure of ‘exception’, this article argues that the ‘exceptional’ role of the student highlights the unique sociopolitical as well as pedagogical aspects of the Umbrella Movement. Finally, comparing Hong Kong’s 2014 protests to Agamben’s philosophical account of the 1989 Tiananmen protests, this article concludes by suggesting that the Umbrella Movement is not simply a one-off event but fundamentally a manifestation of Hong Kong’s continuing political existence since 1997.
    • Inhabiting the good city: The politics of hate and the urbanisms of hope

      Graham, Elaine L.; Davey, Andrew; University of Chester ; Church of England (Continuum, 2011-06-16)
      This book chapter discusses the involvement of the Church of England in 'disconected' urban areas.
    • Interrogating the Post-Secular

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (Routledge, 2018-11-21)
      This chapter seeks to engage in some detail with the conceptual underpinning of the post-secular. It seeks both to clarify, and defend, the relevance and value of what remains, for some, a relatively controversial conceptual term. However the idea of the postsecular is con-ceived —“post” as either against, beyond, or after; “secular” as denoting institutional decline, loss of personal belief or the effacement of the sacred—I will argue that it still has consider-able potential. It can illuminate the changing tensions between newly-visible religious actors with¬in local and global civil society and those who contest such incursions into the supposed neutrality of the public square. Above all, the unprecedented nature of the post¬secular serves to signal the contradictions inherent in the renewed presence of faith, especially in public life, alongside continuing opposition to religion as a source of legitimate public discourse. Such a juxtaposition of belief and non-belief within postsecularity infuses all our consciousness, even the most religiously devout. It follows that any attempt to speak of faith in public re¬quires a greater sophistication and sensitivity than ever.
    • Introduction

      Dunn, Jonathan; Joziasse, Heleen; Patta, Raj Bharat; University of Chester; University of Manchester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019-08-24)
      This introduction explores how the volume addresses the challenges of living together after empire in many post-colonial cities. It explains how the first section focuses on efforts by people of multiple faiths to live together within their contexts, including such efforts within a neighbourhood in urban Manchester; the array of attempts at creating multi-faith spaces for worship across the globe; and initiatives to commemorate divisive conflict together in Northern Ireland. It outlines how the second section of the volume utilizes particular postcolonial methods to illuminate pressing issues within specific contexts—including women’s leadership in an indigenous denomination in the variegated African landscape, and baptism and discipleship among Dalit communities in India. In the context of growing multiculturalism in the West, this volume offers a postcolonial theological resource, challenging the epistemologies in the Western academy.
    • Introduction

      Collins, Matthew A.; Middleton, Paul; University of Chester; University of Chester (T&T Clark, 2019-05-30)
      Introduction to the volume Matthew Henry: The Bible, Prayer, and Piety – A Tercentenary Celebration (London: T&T Clark, 2019).
    • Introduction

      Morris, Wayne; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2019-05-25)
      Fr Martin McAlinden was a Catholic priest from the Diocese of Dromore and Director of Pastoral Theology at St Patrick’s College Maynooth. Martin was studying for a doctorate at the University of Chester when, in 2016, he sadly died. His research had focussed on the spiritual malaise experienced by many priests in the Catholic Church in Ireland. In response, he developed a theology rooted in the ancient notion of Acedia and he used this as a way of talking about the spiritual crises many priests experience. The ancient response to Acedia, the command to stay in one’s cell and pray, provided Martin with a way of speaking about how this spiritual malaise might be transformed. This book brings together a major article that has emerged out of Martin’s research, together with a series of responses from many who accompanied him during his studies. It is offered to Martin’s brother priests, and to the whole Church, as a gift of love that might, it is hoped, contribute to the spiritual renewal of the Church.