• All God's creatures: Reading Genesis on human and nonhuman animals

      Clough, David; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2009-11-01)
      This book chapter discusses reading Genesis after Darwin with specific reference to understanding the relationship between human beings and other living creatures.
    • Alternative spiritualities, new religions, and the reenchantment of the West

      Partridge, Christopher; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2008-07-22)
      This book chapter discusses the rise of alternative spiritualities in the West, particuarly in relation to popular culture.
    • Barth, Origen, and universal salvation: Restoring particularity

      Greggs, Tom (Oxford University Press, 2009-05-14)
      This book proposes a bold new presentation of universal salvation. The author discusses the third-century theologian, Origen, and the twentieth-century Swiss theologian, Karl Barth, to offer a defence of universalism as rooted in Christian theology, showing this belief does not have to be at the expense of human particularity, freedom, and Christian faith.
    • Early Christian voluntary martyrdom: A statement for the defence

      Middleton, Paul; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2013-09-02)
      Many studies of early Christian martyrdom have noted the phenomenon of voluntary martyrdom. However, most scholars, drawing on criticism of the practice found in the Martyrdom of Polycarp and Clement of Alexandria, dismiss those who provoked their own arrest and death as deviant, heretical, or numerically insignificant. This article argues instead that the earliest Christian martyrologies celebrate voluntary martyrdom as a valid mainstream Christian practice, which faced only isolated challenge in the first three centuries. Furthermore, pagan sources support the view that voluntary martyrdom was a significant historical as well as literary phenomenon. As there is no reason to conclude voluntary martyrdom was anything other than a valid subset of proto-orthodox Christian martyrdom, more attention should be paid to this phenomenon by early Christian historians.
    • Feminist critiques, visions and models of the church

      Graham, Elaine L.; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2018-08-28)
      Whilst women comprise the majority of active lay members of most Christian denominations, they have been vastly under-represented within the Church’s ministries of Word and Sacrament. Critical feminist ecclesiologies invariably have to begin from this situation of invisibility and discrimination, whilst arguing for the historic and contemporary legitimacy of women’s full participation alongside men. Feminist critiques and reconstructions have drawn on Biblical and historical evidence in order to refute patterns of hierarchy and exclusion in favour of more egalitarian traditions of the Church as a community of equals. The various strands of the ‘Women-Church’ movement have also been central to a practical feminist ecclesiology, in which women have sought new ways to name their everyday experience as sacred and to exercise new patterns of ministry and leadership. Institutionally-led initiatives, such as the World Council of Churches’ programme on The Community of Women and Men in the Church, have met with mixed success; and increasingly, feminist ecclesiology has focused on the lived experience of women, not only in mainstream churches but in locally-based, informal liturgical communities. These serve to illustrate the extent to which liturgy and worship has been one of the most creative well-springs of feminist activity and renewal; and may, in the long run, be seen to have exercised the greatest lasting impact on the life of the Church.
    • Jesus in an age of enlightenment: Radical gospels from Thomas Hobbes to Thomas Jefferson. By Jonathan C.P Birch

      Greenaway, Jonathan; University of Chester
      A review of Jesus in an Age of Enlightenment: Radical Gospels from Thomas Hobbes to Thomas Jefferson by Jonathan C.P Birch
    • Liberalism versus Postliberalism. The Great Divide in Twentieth Century Theology. By John Allan Knight

      Fulford, Ben; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2014-02-21)
      Book review.
    • Review of Andrew Hofer Christ in the Life and Teaching of Gregory of Nazianzus

      Fulford, Ben; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2016-05-11)
      Review of Andrew Hofer's Christ in the Life and Teaching of Gregory of Nazianzus.
    • Review of Reading Faithfully. Writings from the Archives. 2 vols. By Hans W. Frei, edited by Mike Higton and Mark Alan Bowald

      Fulford, Ben; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2018-12-11)
      Book review.
    • Television and the Bible in American Popular Culture

      Collins, Matthew A.; University of Chester
      This essay examines the Bible in American television, focusing in particular on the twenty-first century. It suggests that there are three broad categories which may helpfully illustrate and encompass the diverse ways in which the Bible appears and/or is utilized: (i) educating about the Bible (e.g., documentaries); (ii) dramatizing the Bible (renditions of biblical stories); and (iii) drawing on the Bible (the impact or use of the Bible in other television programs). Examining each of these in turn, this essay highlights the prevalence of the Bible within television and thus within American popular culture more generally, as well as considering some of the myriad ways in which it has been read, used, and interpreted. In particular, it endeavors to show how the medium can function as a tool for both reflecting and promoting levels of biblical literacy among its audience.
    • The work of creation: Image, idolatry, and Jewish discourse in theology and the arts

      Vincent, Alana M.; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2015-05-16)
      The Second Commandment, prohibiting both the worship and manufacture of graven images, is often employed as a mechanism for explaining a perceived absence of Jewish participation in the visual arts, in spite of a well recorded history of Jewish participation in the manufacture of graven images which are typically classed as craft objects. This article aims to introduce to theology the scepticism towards hierarchical distinctions between art and craft which is already familiar in the world of art theory, and by so doing prompt a dislocation of theological reflection on works of art from the point of visual engagement to the point of manufacture. It suggests that attentiveness to Jewish discourses about material production opens up interesting and potentially generative possibilities for work in theology and the arts beyond the consideration of specifically Jewish art.