• Distant readings of the geographies in text corpora: Mapping Norman Nicholson’s poems and letters

      Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; Donaldson, Christopher; Gregory, Ian; University of Chester; Lancaster University (CVCE Workshop Proceedings, 2016)
      This short article summarises a preliminary study of the poetry and correspondence of the English poet Norman Nicholson (1914-1987), undertaken as part of Lancaster University’s Spatial Humanities: Texts, GIS, Places project. In addition to offering a concise explanation of the Spatial Humanities project and the methods it employs, the article explains how working with GIS, visualisation techniques, and distant reading enriches our understanding both of the geography of Nicholson’s poetry and of the spatial dimensions of the network of people with whom he exchanged letters throughout his career.
    • Documents for schools: The letter-books of Sir William Brereton

      Jackson, Maggie; Gaunt, Peter (Cheshire Community Council and Chester College, 1995)
      This article discusses the letter-books of Sir William Brereton, who led the Parliamentary war effort in Cheshire during the English Civil War. The extracts are intended for use at key stage 3 in the national curriculum, unit 2, "the making of the United Kingdom: crowns, Parliaments and peoples, 1500-1750."
    • Dryland Structures

      Taylor, Barry; Milner, Nicky; Conneller, Chantal; University of Chester, University of York, University of Manchester (White Rose University Press, 2018-04-12)
      The dryland structures
    • Earls and earldoms during King Stephen's reign

      White, Graeme J.; Chester College of Higher Education (Liverpool University Press, 2000-09-01)
      This book chapter discusses the proliferation of earldoms in the reign of King Stephen and the reasons for their creation.
    • Early Holocene wetland succession at Lake Flixton (UK) and its implications for Mesolithic settlement

      Taylor, Barry; University of Chester (Springer Verlag, 2019-02-28)
      This paper reports on new research into the timing and nature of post-glacial environmental change at Lake Flixton (North Yorkshire, UK). Previous investigations indicate a succession of wetland environments during the early Holocene, ultimately infilling the basin by ca 7,000 cal BP. The expansion of wetland environments, along with early Holocene woodland development, has been linked to changes in the human occupation of this landscape during the Mesolithic (ca 11,300-6,000 cal BP). However, our understanding of the timing and nature of environmental change within the palaeolake is poor, making it difficult to correlate to known patterns of Mesolithic activity. This paper provides a new record for both the chronology and character of environmental change within Lake Flixton, and discusses the implications for the Mesolithic occupation of the surrounding landscape.
    • Early Holocene wetland succession in Lake Flixton.

      Taylor, Barry; University of Chester (Quarternary Research Association, 2017-09-30)
      This chapter discusses the evidence for wetland succession during the early Holocene in lake Flixton
    • The enclosure of West Chester: Keeping ahead of 'champion England'

      White, Graeme J.; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2012-10-18)
      This book chapter discusses the enclosure movement in west Cheshire and how the landowners of Cheshire managed to avoid this.
    • Engendered bodies and objects of memory in Final Phase graves

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Oxbow Books, 2010-07-07)
      The grave goods within conversion-period or Final Phase burial rites of the seventh and early eighth centuries AD have received varying explanations by archaeologists. Common interpreative themes include religious conversion, kingdom formation and new ideologies connected to both of these processes. This book chapter presents a distinct but related perspective on the wealthy female assemblages found in some Final Phase graves at Harford Farm, Norfolk.
    • The English civil wars, 1642-1651

      Gaunt, Peter; Chester College of Higher Education (Osprey, 2003-08-20)
      This book discusses the causes, course and consequences of the English Civil War, with particular emphasis on the wars in England and Wales.
    • Envisioning Cremation: Art and Archaeology

      Williams, Howard; Watson, Aaron; University of Chester (Equinox, 2019-01-01)
      Focusing on artist’s impressions of early Anglo-Saxon cremations, we reflect on the potentials and chal- lenges of collaborations between artists and archaeologists to both convey the fiery transformation of the dead in the human past, and provide reflection on our society’s own engagement with mortality in which cremation has become a commonplace dimension. We show the potential of art to challenge pre-conceived notions and understandings of cremation past and present, positioning art as a key dimension of public mortuary archaeology.
    • Ethnographies for early Anglo-Saxon cremation

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Éditions Mergoil, 2016-10-02)
      This chapter shows how archaeological investigations of early Anglo-Saxon cremation practices can be enhanced and extended by anthropological theory and ethnographic analogies. While the interactions between fire, material culture, architecture, space and the human body have been increasingly theorised for early Anglo-Saxon death rituals, this chapter illustrates how refined interpretations can be arrived at using two themes: (i) the significances of vessels and containers as pyre-goods and (ii) building timber-post structures associated with single and multiple cremation burials.
    • Excavations at Flixton Island

      Milner, Nicky; Taylor, Barry; Conneller, Chantal; University of York; University of Chester; University of Manchester (Quarternary Research Association, 2017-09-30)
      This chapter outlines the results of fieldwork at Flixton Island
    • Feathered friends: Birds in early Anglo-Saxon burial rites

      Nugent, Ruth; University of Chester (Maney, 2011)
      This note discusses a study concerning the fragmentary remains of birds in early Anglo-Saxon burials.
    • Fieldwork

      Taylor, Barry; Milner, Nicky; Conneller, Chantal; Schadla-Hall, Tim; University of Chester, University of York, University of Manchester, University College London (White Rose University Press, 2018-04-12)
      Chapter 2, a summary of the fieldwork carried out 2006-2015
    • Fighting a lost battle: The Reichsbund juedischer Frontsoldaten and the rise of National Socialism

      Grady, Tim; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2010-03-01)
      This article argues that the actions of the German-Jewish war veterans’ association, the Reichsbund jüdischer Frontsoldaten (RjF), who have been strongly criticised because of their response to National Socialism, need to be understood in the light of the confusing mixed signals that shaped the first years of National Socialist rule.
    • Firing the Imagination: Cremation in the Museum

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2016-06-09)
      This volume addresses the relationship between archaeologists and the dead, through the many dimensions of their relationships: in the field (through practical and legal issues), in the lab (through their analysis and interpretation), and in their written, visual and exhibitionary practice--disseminated to a variety of academic and public audiences. Written from a variety of perspectives, its authors address the experience, effect, ethical considerations, and cultural politics of working with mortuary archaeology. Whilst some papers reflect institutional or organizational approaches, others are more personal in their view: creating exciting and frank insights into contemporary issues that have hitherto often remained "unspoken" among the discipline. Reframing funerary archaeologists as "death-workers" of a kind, the contributors reflect on their own experience to provide both guidance and inspiration to future practitioners, arguing strongly that we have a central role to play in engaging the public with themes of mortality and commemoration, through the lens of the past. Spurred by the recent debates in the UK, papers from Scandinavia, Austria, Italy, the US, and the mid-Atlantic, frame these issues within a much wider international context that highlights the importance of cultural and historical context in which this work takes place.
    • Fortress Salopia: Exploring Shropshire's Military History from the Prehistoric Period to the Twentieth Century

      Jenkins, Tim; Abbiss, Rachael; University of Chester
      Fortress Salopia is the culmination of contributions from heritage and historic professionals, practising archaeologists and academic historians that explores the unique military past of the county of Shropshire from the prehistoric period to the 20th century. Shropshire is one of the most characteristic counties of the Welsh Marches and occupied a strategic position between England and Wales. Consequently, the county boasts the highest numbers of Iron Age hillforts in England and the greatest density of Motte & Bailey castles. The archaeological remains that adorn the landscape are a prescient reminder that Shropshire was once a frontier battleground, although such reminders are often lost amongst the picturesque rural landscape that prevails today.
    • From Archaeo-Engage to Arts of Engagement

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Archaeopress, 2019-11-27)
      The chapter outlines the rationale for the 2nd University of Chester Archaeology Student Conference – Archaeo-Engage: Engaging Communities in Archaeology. It serves as a companion chapter to this book’s Introduction. It reviews and contextualises the student presentations and keynote talks in relation to key current debates in public archaeology, and explains the journey towards publication incorporating student contributions and those by heritage professionals and academics. In doing so, the chapter provides a practical reflection on how undergraduate student work can contribute to current public archaeological investigations and debates.
    • From Celebrating Diversity to British Values: The Changing Face of Holocaust Memorial Day in Britain

      Critchell, Kara; University of Chester
      2021 marks the twentieth anniversary of Holocaust Memorial Day (HMD) in Britain. In the two decades since the inaugural ceremony took place successive British government have sought to position themselves at the very forefront of Holocaust remembrance and education on a national, international, and supranational, level. As such, the Holocaust has emerged as a dominant socio-political symbol in twenty-first century Britain even though the event intersects with the British experience in few ways, in part, due to the lack of connections the country has to the sites of deportation or extermination. Though the increase in activities for HMD suggests a growing engagement with the Holocaust in British society this obscures the complex discourses surrounding the day, and inherent tensions that have existed within it since its inception in 1999. This chapter explores some of these by tracing the shift in Holocaust remembrance in Britain since the establishment of HMD in 2001, considering the political tensions surrounding it and the changing politicised messages being promoted by it. It is the position of this chapter that, evermore, HMD is being utilised as a means by which to evoke specific values for the furthering of very particular political agendas.
    • Furnishing the Dukes with a Royal Reputation: The use of chambers and chapels at the Burgundian Court

      Wilson, Katherine A.; University of Chester (Leuven university Press, 2018-10-01)
      This article examines the way in which the dukes of Burgundy used chambers and chapels to legitimise their right to rule and to suggest that they could lay claim to a royal crown.