• Dryland Structures

      Taylor, Barry; Milner, Nicky; Conneller, Chantal; University of Chester, University of York, University of Manchester (White Rose University Press, 2018-04-12)
      The dryland structures
    • Earls and earldoms during King Stephen's reign

      White, Graeme J.; Chester College of Higher Education (Liverpool University Press, 2000-09-01)
      This book chapter discusses the proliferation of earldoms in the reign of King Stephen and the reasons for their creation.
    • Early Holocene wetland succession at Lake Flixton (UK) and its implications for Mesolithic settlement

      Taylor, Barry; University of Chester (Springer Verlag, 2019-02-28)
      This paper reports on new research into the timing and nature of post-glacial environmental change at Lake Flixton (North Yorkshire, UK). Previous investigations indicate a succession of wetland environments during the early Holocene, ultimately infilling the basin by ca 7,000 cal BP. The expansion of wetland environments, along with early Holocene woodland development, has been linked to changes in the human occupation of this landscape during the Mesolithic (ca 11,300-6,000 cal BP). However, our understanding of the timing and nature of environmental change within the palaeolake is poor, making it difficult to correlate to known patterns of Mesolithic activity. This paper provides a new record for both the chronology and character of environmental change within Lake Flixton, and discusses the implications for the Mesolithic occupation of the surrounding landscape.
    • Early Holocene wetland succession in Lake Flixton.

      Taylor, Barry; University of Chester (Quarternary Research Association, 2017-09)
      This chapter discusses the evidence for wetland succession during the early Holocene in lake Flixton
    • The enclosure of West Chester: Keeping ahead of 'champion England'

      White, Graeme J.; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2012-10-18)
      This book chapter discusses the enclosure movement in west Cheshire and how the landowners of Cheshire managed to avoid this.
    • Engendered bodies and objects of memory in Final Phase graves

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Oxbow Books, 2010-07-07)
      The grave goods within conversion-period or Final Phase burial rites of the seventh and early eighth centuries AD have received varying explanations by archaeologists. Common interpreative themes include religious conversion, kingdom formation and new ideologies connected to both of these processes. This book chapter presents a distinct but related perspective on the wealthy female assemblages found in some Final Phase graves at Harford Farm, Norfolk.
    • The English civil wars, 1642-1651

      Gaunt, Peter; Chester College of Higher Education (Osprey, 2003-08-20)
      This book discusses the causes, course and consequences of the English Civil War, with particular emphasis on the wars in England and Wales.
    • Envisioning Cremation: Art and Archaeology

      Williams, Howard; Watson, Aaron; University of Chester (Equinox, 2019-01-01)
      Focusing on artist’s impressions of early Anglo-Saxon cremations, we reflect on the potentials and chal- lenges of collaborations between artists and archaeologists to both convey the fiery transformation of the dead in the human past, and provide reflection on our society’s own engagement with mortality in which cremation has become a commonplace dimension. We show the potential of art to challenge pre-conceived notions and understandings of cremation past and present, positioning art as a key dimension of public mortuary archaeology.
    • Ethnographies for early Anglo-Saxon cremation

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Éditions Mergoil, 2016-10-02)
      This chapter shows how archaeological investigations of early Anglo-Saxon cremation practices can be enhanced and extended by anthropological theory and ethnographic analogies. While the interactions between fire, material culture, architecture, space and the human body have been increasingly theorised for early Anglo-Saxon death rituals, this chapter illustrates how refined interpretations can be arrived at using two themes: (i) the significances of vessels and containers as pyre-goods and (ii) building timber-post structures associated with single and multiple cremation burials.
    • Excavations at Flixton Island

      Milner, Nicky; Taylor, Barry; Conneller, Chantal; University of York; University of Chester; University of Manchester (Quarternary Research Association, 2017-09)
      This chapter outlines the results of fieldwork at Flixton Island
    • Feathered friends: Birds in early Anglo-Saxon burial rites

      Nugent, Ruth; University of Chester (Maney, 2011)
      This note discusses a study concerning the fragmentary remains of birds in early Anglo-Saxon burials.
    • Fieldwork

      Taylor, Barry; Milner, Nicky; Conneller, Chantal; Schadla-Hall, Tim; University of Chester, University of York, University of Manchester, University College London (White Rose University Press, 2018-04-12)
      Chapter 2, a summary of the fieldwork carried out 2006-2015
    • Fighting a lost battle: The Reichsbund juedischer Frontsoldaten and the rise of National Socialism

      Grady, Tim; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2010-03-01)
      This article argues that the actions of the German-Jewish war veterans’ association, the Reichsbund jüdischer Frontsoldaten (RjF), who have been strongly criticised because of their response to National Socialism, need to be understood in the light of the confusing mixed signals that shaped the first years of National Socialist rule.
    • Firing the Imagination: Cremation in the Museum

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2016-06-09)
      n/a
    • From Archaeo-Engage to Arts of Engagement

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester
      The chapter outlines the rationale for the 2nd University of Chester Archaeology Student Conference – Archaeo-Engage: Engaging Communities in Archaeology. It serves as a companion chapter to this book’s Introduction. It reviews and contextualises the student presentations and keynote talks in relation to key current debates in public archaeology, and explains the journey towards publication incorporating student contributions and those by heritage professionals and academics. In doing so, the chapter provides a practical reflection on how undergraduate student work can contribute to current public archaeological investigations and debates.
    • Furnishing the Dukes with a Royal Reputation. The use of chambers and chapels at the Burgundian Court

      Wilson, Katherine A.; University of Chester (University of Leuven Press, 2018-10-09)
      This article examines the way in which the dukes of Burgundy used chambers and chapels to legitimise their right to rule and to suggest that they could lay claim to a royal crown.
    • Further frontiers in GIS: Extending Spatial Analysis to Textual Sources in Archaeology

      Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; Gregory, Ian; Digital Humanities Research Centre; University of Chester (De Gruyter Open, 2015-05-20)
      Although the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has a long history in archaeology, spatial technologies have been rarely used to analyse the content of textual collections. A newly developed approach termed Geographic Text Analysis (GTA) is now allowing the semi-automated exploration of large corpora incorporating a combination of Natural Language Processing techniques, Corpus Linguistics, and GIS. In this article we explain the development of GTA, propose possible uses of this methodology in the field of archaeology, and give a summary of the challenges that emerge from this type of analysis.
    • Future directions for the archaeology of cremation

      Cerezo-Román, Jessica I.; Williams, Howard; Harvard University ; University of Chester (University of Arizona Press, 2014-11-30)
    • The garden as a laboratory: the role of domestic gardens as places of scientific exploration in the long 18th century

      Hickman, Clare; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2014-06-24)
      Eighteenth-century gardens have traditionally been viewed as spaces designed for leisure, and as representations of political status, power and taste. In contrast, this paper will explore the concept that gardens in this period could be seen as dynamic spaces where scientific experiment and medical practice could occur. Two examples have been explored in the pilot study which has led to this paper — the designed landscapes associated with John Hunter’s Earl’s Court residence, in London, and the garden at Edward Jenner’s house in Berkeley, Gloucestershire. Garden history methodologies have been implemented in order to consider the extent to which these domestic gardens can be viewed as experimental spaces.
    • Geographical Information Systems as a Tool for Exploring the Spatial Humanities

      Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; Gregory, Ian; University of Chester; Lancaster University (Routledge, 2016-07-28)
      This chapter will introduce the basics of geographical information systems (GIS) for humanities scholarship. It will provide a brief overview of how using GIS software can help researchers understand the geographies within their sources. It will briefly introduce how GIS models features and places on the Earth’s surface so that the reader is gets a basic understanding of the core terminology associated with GIS. It will then talk through the basics of how a researcher gets their sources into GIS software; how they can query, integrate and analyse data within GIS; and how they can disseminate their results using maps and electronic outputs such as KML files that can be disseminated using Google Earth. The conclusion will look briefly at what a researcher can and cannot expect to gain from using GIS and stress that mapping is only a part of the research process – good at identifying and describing patterns but limited in its ability to explain them. The chapter will be include several diagrams and will be extensively referenced.