• Introduction: Archaeologies of Cremation

      Williams, Howard; Cerezo-Román, Jessica I.; Wessman, Anna; University of Chester; CalPol; University of Helsinki (Oxford University Press, 2017-04-27)
      Introduction to the edited collection 'Cremation and the Archaeology of Death'
    • Introduction: Mortuary Archaeology in Contemporary Society

      Giles, Melanie; Williams, Howard; University of Manchester; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2016-06-09)
      n/a
    • Introduction: public archaeologies as arts of engagement

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester
      By way of introduction to the book, this chapter sets out the principal recent developments and characteristics of public archaeology, focusing on the UK. By contextualising the chapters which originated as presentations in the 2017 student conference, as well as those contributions subsequently commissioned for the book, the specific theme of art/archaeology interactions in public archaeology is defined and its multiple facets are reviewed
    • Introduction: Rethinking Literary Mapping

      Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; Donaldson, Christopher; Cooper, David; University of Chester; Lancaster University; Manchester Metropolitan University (Routledge, 2016-05-20)
      This book is about the relationship between the practice of mapping, the application of geospatial technologies and the interpretation of literary texts. The contributors have been selected from a range of disciplines and they approach this relationship from different perspectives. Yet, notwithstanding these differences, their contributions are collectively defined by a shared preoccupation with the possibilities afforded – and the problems presented – by the use of digital mapping tools and techniques in literary studies and cultural-geographical research. Each of the following chapters, that is to say, explores the dynamic ways that the creation of literary maps can confirm meaning and challenge critical assumptions.
    • Introduction: stones in substance, space and time

      Williams, Howard; Kirton, Joanne; Gondek, Meggen M.; University of Chester; Big Heritage (Boydell Press, 2015-09-17)
      A triad of research themes – materiality, biography and landscape – provide the distinctive foci and parameters of the contributions to this book. The chapters explore a range of early medieval inscribed and sculpted stone monuments from Ireland (Ní Ghrádaigh and O’Leary), Britain (Gondek, Hall, Kirton and Williams) and Scandinavia (Back Danielsson and Crouwers). The chapters together show how these themes enrich and expand the interdisciplinary study of early medieval stone monuments, in particular revealing how a range of different inscribed and sculpted stones were central to the creation and recreation of identities and memories for early medieval individuals, families, households, religious and secular communities and kingdoms.
    • Introspection and the Self in Early Modern Spiritual (Auto) Biography

      Hillman, Jennifer; University of Chester (Bloomsbury, 2020)
      This chapter will explore the intersections between memory, introspection and selfhood in spiritual biographical and autobiographical texts produced in France over the long eighteenth century. This chapter uses case studies from eighteenth-century France to destabilise teleological narratives surrounding the emergence of selfhood and subjectivity in the eighteenth century and its association with modernity and secularisation.
    • Irish migrants in Britain 1815-1914: A documentary history

      Swift, Roger; Chester College of Higher Education (Cork University Press, 2002-03-23)
      This edited book uses a range of contemporary records, including Parliamentary papers, social surveys, newspapers, letters, and reminiscences to explore the experiences of Irish migrants in Britain between 1815 and 1914. The sources focus on migration, settlement, employment, social conditions, religion, Radical and labour movements, nationalism, and Unionism.
    • The Jew in the eruv, the Jew in the Suburb: Contesting the public face and the private space of British Jewry

      Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-04-15)
      Has cultural intolerance of Jews (and other minorities) in modern-day Britain led many Jews to prefer societal 'invisibility'? This chapter questions how such a discourse has played out through Jewish spatial practices and the British-Jewish presentation of those spatial practices, from the immigrant 'ghetto' of the fin de siècle East End to heated debates around the construction of an eruv in north-west London in recent decades.
    • 'The Jew' in late-Victorian and Edwardian culture: between the East End and East Africa

      Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2014-09)
      A book review of the edited collection, ‘The Jew’ in late-Victorian and Edwardian culture: between the East End and East Africa, edited by Nadia Valman and Eitan Bar-Yosef.
    • John Mitchel and his biographers

      Huggins, Michael; University of Chester (Irish Historical Studies Publications Ltd, 2012-11)
      This article discusses Mitchel's biographies, his commemoration in periodical and ephermeral sources, and the development of the historiography of Mitchel.
    • Kingship, Society, and the Church in Anglo-Saxon Yorkshire

      Pickles, Thomas; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2018-11-15)
      A monograph about the relationship between social and political structures, conversion to Christianity, and the building of an institutional Church in Yorkshire from c. 450-c. 1066.
    • Krieg in der Erinnerung – Krieg um die Erinnerung. Das Gedenken an die jüdischen Gefallenen nach 1918

      Grady, Tim; University of Chester (Hentrich & Hentrich, 2014-07-01)
      This book chapter discusses the memory and commemoration of World War I amongst Germany's Jewish population.
    • The land before symbol stones: a geophysical survey of Rhynie, Aberdeenshire and the excavation of a Middle Bronze Age structure near the Craw Stane, Barflat

      Gondek, Meggen M.; Noble, Gordon; Ramsay, Susan; Sheridan, Alison; University of Chester; University of Aberdeen; Freelance archaeobotanical specialist (Susan-Ramsay.co.uk); National Museums of Scotland (Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 2015)
      The Rhynie Environs Archaeological Project (REAP) was initiated in 2005 as a three year (Phase 1) programme of research and fieldwork based in and around the village of Rhynie; the main aim was to study the landscape context of an important group of Pictish symbol stones. Eight symbol stones are known from the village, including one, the Craw Stane, which is likely to be in its original position. A series of cropmark features have also been identified surrounding the ‘Craw Stane,’ and the substantial early medieval remains are set within an area rich with prehistoric monuments. This article outlines the results of geophysical survey and a small targeted excavation conducted in 2005-2006. The surveys included a substantial gradiometer and a smaller resistivity survey that aimed to characterise and explore the extent and survival of archaeology around the symbol stone findspots. The results showed several discrete anomalies; one of these was targeted by a small-scale excavation and proved to be a burnt Middle Bronze Age timber structure. The article highlights the survey and excavation within its landscape context and provides a summary excavation report with specialist reports for the MBA building.
    • Landmarks for the dead: exploring Anglo-Saxon mortuary geographies

      Semple, Sarah; Williams, Howard; Durham University; University of Chester (Liverpool University Press, 2015-11-27)
      To move forward with a robust framework for understanding early medieval mortuary geographies, scholars must escape the romantic dichotomy of regarding the early medieval dead as either confined to the dead pagan ‘communities’ situated on the periphery and borders of the living world, or safely bounded within churchyards under Christian pastoral care. While there is widespread recognition of the variability in early medieval burial sites and their spatial components, only a handful of studies have considered them as places of memory within complex and evolving historic landscapes, despite evidence for rich overlapping and changing burial terrains across the period. This chapter offers a new introduction and framework for just such an approach to early medieval mortuary geography.
    • The landscape of a Swedish boat-grave cemetery

      Williams, Howard; Rundkvist, Martin; Danielsson, Arne; University of Chester (Oxbow, 2010-03-01)
      The paper integrates topographical and experiential approaches to the mortuary landscape of a Viking period inhumation-grave excavated in 2005 within the cemetery at Skamby, Kuddy parish, Östergötland province, Sweden. We argue that the landscape context was integral to the performance of the funerary ceremonies and the subsequent monumental presence of the dead in the landscape. We offer a way to move beyond monocausal explanations for burial location based on single-scale analyses. Instead, we suggest that boat-inhumation at Skamby was a commemorative strategy that operated on multiple scales and drew its significance from multiple landscape attributes.
    • Landscapes of Internment: British Prisoner of War Camps and the Memory of the First World War

      Grady, Tim; University of Chester (Cambridge University Press, 2019-07-26)
      During the First World War, all the belligerent powers interned both civilian and military prisoners. In Britain alone, over 100,000 people were held behind barbed wire. Despite the scale of this enterprise, interment barely features in Britain's First World War memory culture. By exploring the place of prisoner of war camps within the "militarized environment" of the home front, this article demonstrates the centrality of internment to local wartime experiences. Being forced to share the same environment meant that both British civilians and German prisoners clashed over access to resources, roads and the surrounding landscape. As the article contends, it was only when the British started to employ the prisoners on environmental improvement measures, such as land drainage or river clearance projects, that relations gradually improved. With the end of the war and closure of the camps, however, these deep entanglements were quickly forgotten. Instead of commemorating the complexities of the conflict, Britain's memory culture focused on more comfortable narratives; British military "sacrifice" on the Western Front quickly replaced any discussion of the internment of the "enemy" at home.
    • Lay Female Devotional Lives in the Counter Reformation

      Hillman, Jennifer; University of Chester (Brill Academic Publishers, 2017-01-01)
      In 1563, the Catholic Church responded to the Protestant challenge to the religious life as the most holy feminine state with the maxim aut maritus aut murus (wife or wall). The navigation of that dictum by early modern women across Catholic Europe has arguably been one of the dominant themes in the scholarship over the last thirty years. Certainly, there had always been the opportunity for women to lead a religious life outside of marriage and the cloister as beatas, tertiaries and beguines. Yet it was after the Council of Trent (1545-63) that women had to renegotiate a space in the world in which they could lead spiritually-fulfilling devotional lives. If this was one unintended legacy of 1517, then the quincentenary of the Reformation seems a timely moment to reflect on new directions in the now burgeoning historiography on lay women in Counter-Reformation Europe.
    • Learning the ropes in 'his own fields': Cromwell's early seiges in the east Midlands

      Gaunt, Peter; Chester College of Higher Education (The Cromwell Association, 2003-01-01)
      This article discusses Oliver Comwell's early military career in East Anglia and the east Midlands during the English Civil War.
    • A lifetime of service in the Roman Church

      Doran, John; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2009-01-28)
      This book chapter discusses the career of Pope Celestine, focusing on his time in the city of Rome.