• A well-urned rest: Cremation and inhumation in early Anglo-Saxon England

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (University of Arizona Press, 2014)
    • Wellsprings of a 'World War': An early English attempt to conquer Canada during King William's war, 1688-97

      McLay, Keith A. J.; University of Chester (2006-06)
      This article discusses the military history of the early years of King William's War, 1688-97, including an early attempt to conquer French Canada in 1690 by Sir William Phips. The article places this within differeing interpretations of the military historiography of early modern colonial America.
    • William Caxton and Commemorative Culture in Fifteenth-Century England

      Harry, David; University of Chester (Boydell and Brewer, 2014-09-18)
      This piece explores Caxton's use of the language of the 'common profit' as a means of ensuring that his publishing endeavors offered both spiritual nourishment for his readers, and reciprocal benefit for the printer.
    • The Wooden Structures

      Bamforth, Michael; Taylor, Maisie; Taylor, Barry; Robson, Harry K.; Radini, Anita; Milner, Nicky; University of York, University of York, University of Chester, University of York, University of York, University of York, (White Rose University Press, 2018-04-12)
      The wooden structures at Star Carr
    • Writing a Spiritual Biography in Early Modern France: The 'Many Lives' of Madeleine de Lamoignon

      Hillman, Jennifer; University of Chester (Duke University Press, 2019-02-01)
      In the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, four different spiritual biographers wrote the "life" of the recently deceased lay dévote, Madeleine de Lamoignon (1609-1687). Each of these authors was seeking to compose a spiritual biography - an account of Madeleine's devotional life - and they were all penned with the distant prospect of beatification or canonisation in mind. This article analyses these four retellings of Madeleine's life in order to excavate the process of writing vitae, and situates this within the broader context of lay spiritual biography in early modern France. It is argued here that a comparative exploration of Madeleine de Lamoignon's "lives" reveals different, and sometimes competing, conceptions of lay female sanctity in the Counter-Reformation era. Ultimately, the article contends that by turning our attention to neglected biographies of lay women, scholars might better understand how a life outside of the cloister could be reconciled with saintliness.
    • Writing and sources III: Cromwell's death at Chepstow, summer 1648

      Gaunt, Peter; Chester College of Higher Education (The Cromwell Association, 2000)
      This article discusses a pamphlet which gives an account of Cromwell's supposed death and death-bed pronouncements at Chepstow in summer 1648.
    • Writing and sources III: The Siege of Crowland, 1643

      Gaunt, Peter; Chester College of Higher Education (The Cromwell Association, 1999)
      This article discusses various sources relating to the seige of Crowland in south Lincolnshire in April 1643.