• Tapestry of the Burgundian Dominions. A complex object

      Wilson, Katherine A.; University of Chester (Jan Thorbecke Verlag, 2013)
      A consideration of tapestry as an object, part of a wider collection of material culture in the later Middle Ages.
    • The Cheshire Magna Carta: distinctive or derivative?

      White, Graeme J. (Oxford University Press (OUP), 2017-12-12)
    • 'They died for Germany': Jewish soldiers, the German Army and conservative debates about the Nazi past in the 1960s

      Grady, Tim; University of Chester (SAGE, 2009)
      There has been an increasing recognition in recent historical writing that the late 1950s and early 1960s marked a significant shift in West German society's relationship to the Nazi past. Yet the older more conservative generation that dominated West Germany's politics of confronting the past in the immediate post-war years are largely absent from these narratives. Focusing on the actions of the Federal Republic's staunchly conservative Defence Minister, Franz Josef Strauß, this article argues that even the conservative establishment played a significant role in West Germany's evolving memory culture. In the early 1960s, Strauß promoted the republication of a book of German-Jewish soldiers' war letters from the First World War. The collection enabled him to portray a different side of West Germany at a time when attention had focused back onto the crimes of the Nazi era. Despite this opportunism, the article contends that Strauß's support for the new book encouraged other conservative institutions to engage more fully with the recent past.
    • Things in Vikings

      Sanmark, Alexandra; Williams, Howard; University of Highlands and Islands; University of Chester
      In popular imagery, Vikings are often depicted as the ultimate lawless barbarians. Yet, as with all early medieval “barbarians” inspired by the writings of Tacitus, they have long been romanticized in Western popular culture for their supposed inherent equality and fairness, within which the roots of Nordic democracy are perceived.1 At the fulcrum of these stereotypes of nobility and savagery are Norse legal practices and assembly places. This chapter reviews the assembly places and practices depicted in the television show 'Vikings'.
    • Thomas Caryle and Ireland

      Swift, Roger; Chester College of Higher Education (Four Courts Press, 2004)
      This book chapter discusses Thomas Caryle's statement in his pamphlet - Chartism, that "crowds of miserable Irish darken all our towns".
    • Three great tutors: Lovell, Ardern, Morrell

      White, Graeme J.; Chester College of Higher Education (Governors of Chester College, 1989)
      This book chapter discusses three long-serving tutors at Chester College, Albert Lovell (Master of Method and lecturer in Education), Theodore Ardern (music tutor), and Herbert Morrell (Master of Method and lecturer in Education), focusing on the influence they had on their students.
    • "To create a little world out of chaos": The establishment of the Protectorate, 1653-4

      Gaunt, Peter; University College Chester (The Cromwell Association, 2004)
      This article discusses the first phase of Oliver Cromwell's Protectorate from its establishment in mid December 1653 through to the the first Protectorate Parliament in September 1654. It focuses on the structure of the regime and who held power, the priorities and policies of the regime, and the failings of the first Protectorate Parliament.
    • 'To create a little world out of chaos': The Protectoral ordinances of 1653-1654 reconsidered

      Gaunt, Peter; University of Chester (Boydell Press, 2007)
      This book chapter analyses 180 ordinances issued by Oliver Cromwell and the council between 1653 and 1654.
    • ‘To our big boy’. Zoos and animal sanctuaries as deathscapes

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Nordic Academic Press, 2019-06-01)
      n/a
    • Together as one: The landscape of the symbol stones at Rhynie, Aberdeenshire

      Gondek, Meggen M.; Noble, Gordon; University of Chester ; University of Aberdeen (Brill, 2011)
      This book chapter discusses the Rhynie Environs Archaeological Project (REAP) which explored a group of Pictish monuments in the village of Rhynie in Aberdeenshire.
    • Toponym matching through deep neural networks

      Santos, Rui; Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; Calado, Pável; Martins, Bruno (Informa UK Limited, 2017-10-31)
    • Towards an archaeology of cremation

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Academic Press, 2015-06-25)
      How can we begin to understand and explain the changing significance of cremation in past societies? From many parts of the world and for many periods of human history from as early as the Upper Palaeolithic (Bowler et al., 1980) to recent centuries, archaeologists have uncovered and investigated material evidence for the use of fire as a means of transforming and disposing of the dead. This chapter argues that in contrast to the rich and widespread evidence for cremation in the archaeological record, theoretical approaches in the archaeology of cremation have been relatively thin on the ground until very recently. This relative failure to adequately engage with the complexity and the variability of cremation practices across cultures seems connected to the fact that most of the theoretical debates and developments in mortuary archaeology have, until quite recently, been primarily geared to the investigation of unburned human remains. Therefore, alongside increasingly refined methodologies for investigating burnt bones, it is argued that archaeologists need to redress this imbalance by developing explicit theoretical approaches to the phenomenon of cremation. Such theories need to engage with broad cross-cultural themes and also remain sensitive to the considerable variety of mortuary procedures involving fire used at different times and in different places.
    • Translational Public Archaeology? Archaeology, social benefit, and working with offenders in Wales (Part 2)

      Pudney, Caroline; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2018-06-05)
      This article reports on a second case study in the relationship between archaeology and social benefit through working with young offenders in Wales. Whereas a previous article (Pudney 2018), focused on the MORTARIA Project - an archaeological education project engaging adult offenders in South Wales - this study explores the distinctive methods and challenges faced by the subsequent Heritage Graffiti Project (HGP). This project faced similar, but also different, experiences to MORTARIA, involving different skills and technologies, as well as specific artistic engagement with place. The article considers the effectiveness of the HGP before reflecting on the two projects’ shared implications for future, translational public archaeology projects that wish to work with offenders.
    • A unique engraved shale pendant from the site of Star Carr

      Milner, Nicky; Bamforth, Michael; Beale, Gareth; Carty, Julian C.; Chatzipanagis, Konstantinos; Croft, Shannon; Elliott, Ben; Fitton, Laura C.; Knight, Becky; Kröger, Roland; et al. (Internet Archaeology, 2016-02-26)
      In 2015 an engraved shale pendant was found during excavations at the Early Mesolithic site of Star Carr, UK. Engraved motifs on Mesolithic pendants are extremely rare, with the exception of amber pendants from southern Scandinavia. The artwork on the pendant is the earliest known Mesolithic art in Britain; the 'barbed line' motif is comparable to styles on the Continent, particularly in Denmark. When it was first uncovered the lines were barely visible but using a range of digital imaging techniques it has been possible to examine them in detail and determine the style of engraving as well as the order in which the lines might have been made. In addition, microwear and residue analyses were applied to examine whether the pendant showed signs that it had been strung or worn, and whether the lines had been made more visible through the application of pigments, as has been suggested for some Danish amber pendants. This approach of using multiple scientific and analytical techniques has not been used previously and provides a methodology for the examination of similar artefacts in the future.
    • US Foreign Policy in the Horn of Africa: From Colonialism to Terrorism

      Jackson, Donna; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-10-30)
      Examining American foreign policy towards the Horn of Africa between 1945 and 1991, this book uses Ethiopia and Somalia as case studies to offer an evaluation of the decision-making process during the Cold War, and consider the impact that these decisions had upon subsequent developments both within the Horn of Africa and in the wider international context. The decision-making process is studied, including the role of the president, the input of his advisers and lower level officials within agencies such as the State Department and National Security Council, and the parts played by Congress, bureaucracies, public opinion, and other actors within the international environment, especially the Soviet Union, Ethiopia and Somalia. Jackson examines the extent to which influences exerted by forces other than the president affected foreign policy, and provides the first comprehensive analysis of American foreign policy towards Ethiopia and Somalia throughout the Cold War. This book offers a fresh perspective on issues such as globalism, regionalism, proxy wars, American aid programmes, anti-communism and human rights. It will be of great interest to students and academics in various fields, including American foreign policy, American Studies and Politics, the history of the Cold War, and the history of the Horn of Africa during the modern era.
    • Viking Mortuary Citations

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2016-07-06)
      Introducing the European Journal of Archaeology’s special issue ‘Mortuary Citations: Death and Memory in the Viking World’, this article outlines the justification and theoretical framework underpinning a new set of studies on Viking-age mortuary and commemorative practice as strategies of mortuary citation. The contributions to the collection are reviewed in relation to strengths and weaknesses in existing research and broader themes in mortuary archaeological research into memory work in past societies.
    • Virtually dead: digital public mortuary archaeology

      Williams, Howard; Atkin, Alison; University of Chester; University of Sheffield (Internet Archaeology, 2015)
      Over recent decades, the ethics, politics and public engagements of mortuary archaeology have received sustained scrutiny, including how we handle, write about and display the archaeological dead. Yet the burgeoning use of digital media to engage different audiences in the archaeology of death and burial have so far escaped attention. This article explores categories and strategies by which digital media create virtual communities engaging with mortuary archaeology. Considering digital public mortuary archaeology (DPMA) as a distinctive theme linking archaeology, mortality and material culture, we discuss blogs, vlogs and Twitter as case studies to illustrate the variety of strategies by which digital media can promote, educate and engage public audiences with archaeological projects and research relating to death and the dead in the human past. The article then explores a selection of key critical concerns regarding how the digital dead are currently portrayed, identifying the need for further investigation and critical reflection on DPMA’s aims, objectives and aspired outcomes.
    • Visualizing Jews: An Introduction to Literary and Material Representations of Jewishness and Judaism Through the Ages

      Ewence, Hannah; Spurling, Helen; University of Chester; University of Southampton (Routledge, 2015-04-15)
      A wide-ranging introduction that offers a new approach for examining the relationship between Jews, Judaism, Jewishness and visual culture. The editors suggest that debates surrounding literary and material images within Judaism and Jewish life are part of an on-going strategy of image management; that is, the urge to shape, direct, authorise and contain Jewish literary and material images and encounters with those images.
    • Vizualising Jews through the Ages: Literary and Material Representations of Jewishness and Judaism

      Ewence, Hannah; Spurling, Helen; University of Chester; University of Southampton (Routledge, 2015-04-24)
      This volume explores literary and material representations of Jews, Jewishness and Judaism from antiquity to the twenty-first century. Gathering leading scholars from within the field of Jewish Studies, it investigates how the debates surrounding literary and material images within Judaism and in Jewish life are part of an on-going strategy of image management - the urge to shape, direct, authorize and contain Jewish literary and material images and encounters with those images - a strategy both consciously and unconsciously undertaken within multifarious arenas of Jewish life from early modern German lands to late twentieth-century North London, late Antique Byzantium to the curation of contemporary Holocaust exhibitions.