• Ogaden

      Jackson, Donna; University of Chester (Wiley-Blackwell, 2015-12-30)
      The Ogaden, a mostly barren desert in southeast Ethiopia, has long been a source of ethnic and nationalist conflict. Although officially within Ethiopia's territorial borders, the region is largely inhabited by ethnic Somalis, who have demanded, and continue to demand, the removal of Ethiopian authority and reunification with Somalia. Frequent border skirmishes have occasionally erupted into war, most notably the Ogaden War of 1977–78, often considered a major factor in the demise of détente between the United States and the Soviet Union.
    • Oliver Cromwell

      Gaunt, Peter; Chester College of Higher Education (British Library, 2004-09-01)
      This book discusses the life and career of Oliver Cromwell.
    • Oliver Cromwell

      Gaunt, Peter; Chester College of Higher Education (Blackwell Publishing, 1997-06-08)
      This book discusses the life and career of Oliver Cromwell.
    • Oliver Cromwell and Great Britain

      Gaunt, Peter; Chester College of Higher Education (The Cromwell Association, 1999-06-01)
      This book chapter discusses Cromwell's travels throughout Great Britain.
    • Oliver Cromwell and the opening of the First Protectorate Parliament

      Gaunt, Peter; University College Chester (The Cromwell Association, 2005)
      This article discusses the first Protectorate Parliament in 1654.
    • Oliver Cromwell’s letter to Colonel Valentine Walton, conveying good and bad news arising from the battle of Marston Moor, written on 5 July 1644

      Gaunt, Peter; University of Chester (The Cromwell Association, 2014-10)
      This electronic publication provides a detailed document analysis of a specific letter written by Oliver Cromwell for which the original (in Cromwell's own hand) survives, namely the letter which he wrote to his brother-in-law shortly after the battle of Marston Moor of 2 July 1644 and describing the nature and consequences of that engagement. It examines in detail the contents, language, meaning and interpretation of the letter and also explores the different historical interpretations which have been placed upon it.
    • 'One of the goodliest and strongest places that I ever looked upon': Montgomery and the Civil War

      Gaunt, Peter; Chester College of Higher Education (University of Liverpool Press, 2000-09-08)
      This chatper examines the impact of the civil war on the town of Montgomery during 1644.
    • Open fields and rural settlement in medieval west Cheshire

      White, Graeme J.; Chester College of Higher Education (Leopard's Head Press, 1995)
      This book chapter discusses thirty two vills in the Dee and Gowy valleys (south of Chester) as dispersed settlements where fields took the form of closes held in severalty, rather than unenclosed strips farmed in common as a response to changing demographic and economic pressures.
    • The Oratory of Jimmy Carter

      Jackson, Donna; Lehrman, Robert; University of Chester; American University, Washington DC (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016-01-06)
      Successful rhetoric, it has been argued, comes from an effective fusion of ethos, pathos and logos, combined with style and delivery (Foss: 2012). While Jimmy Carter may be respected for his post-presidential career, he is not renowned as a great president and this chapter will consider the extent to which his perceived failures can be attributed to his rhetorical style. In particular, we will focus upon three major speeches delivered by Carter during his administration: his inaugural address of January 1977, the Crisis of Confidence speech of 1979, and the State of the Union Address in 1980. Although the content of each speech accurately reflected the relevant context, the response of the American public was markedly different due to rhetoric. The pathos apparent in Carter's inaugural address, delivered with his genuine, personal and informal style, resonated with a nation traumatised by the tragedies and scandals associated with Vietnam and Watergate. However, as the context changed, Carter's informality and personal appeal no longer captivated public attention in the way that it once had. The content of Carter's speeches reflected the tougher approach to both the economy and foreign policy that the public demanded, but he was unable to deliver his message convincingly. Unable to adapt his style and delivery to the changing times, Carter's pathos appeared inappropriate and ethos and logos ineffective by the final year of his administration. Ultimately, Carter proved that successful rhetoric requires a combination of context, content and style, and his inability to consistently produce that fusion contributed to subsequent negative evaluations of his presidency.
    • The outcast Irish in the British Victorian city: Problems and perspectives

      Swift, Roger; Chester College of Higher Education (Irish Historical Society / The Ulster Society for Irish Historical Studies, 2012-06-13)
      This article discusses the experience of Irish migrants in British towns and cities, especially focusing on the concept of 'outcastness'.
    • Palaeoenvironmental Investigations

      Taylor, Barry; Allison, Enid; University of Chester, Canterbury Archaeological Trust (White Rose University Press, 2018-04-12)
      The results of the palaeoenvironmental analyses
    • Paris, Arras et la Cour : Les tapissiers de Philippe le Hardi et Jean sans Peur. 1363-1419

      Wilson, Katherine A.; University of Chester (Cairn Info, 2011-01)
      The study of the delivery of tapestries at the court of Burgundy between 1363 and 1419 highlights a group of persons who mostly reside in Paris and Arras and are referred to as « tapestry-makers » or « merchants ». Among this group of professionals, one can make out those few who managed to carve themselves a position of regular suppliers of the dukes, some of whom being eventually granted the title of « valet de chamber » and occasionally carrying out the function of guardian of the prince’s tapestry, while the others remained occasional suppliers or experts in the repair, maintenance, conditioning and transport of the tapestries. They all shared the urge to seek the patronage of the duke of Burgundy, although the dukes’ orders were never sufficient to ensure their professional survival. And therefore this prince could not be their only customer : some of them worked for other courts (France, Anjou, Orléans, Berry) and all of them had clients among the urban elites. Besides, as can be consistently observed in Arras, the dukes of Burgundy’s tapestry suppliers diversified their activity, for example as cloth and wine merchants, sat on the échevins’ board and belonged to powerful social and professional networks. For them, supplying tapestries, even occasionally and at the risk of significant financial losses, was not an end in itself but a venture that could prove helpful in the pursuit of social and professional ambitions.
    • The Parliamentary war effort in Cheshire

      Gaunt, Peter; Chester College of Higher Education (Cheshire Community Council, 1993)
      This article discusses the efforts of the Parliamentarians, led by Sir William Brereton, to administer Cheshire during the English Civil War. It focuses on the action of the Cheshire County Committee - its membership, its power struggles, and how it raised money and soldiers for the war effort.
    • Philanthropy and the children of the streets: the Chester Ragged School Society, 1851-1870

      Swift, Roger; Chester College of Higher Education (University of Liverpool Press, 1996-10-01)
      This book chapter discusses the Chester Ragged School Society which was founded in 1851 to instruct poor children, especially those who had no other means of obtaining an education. The contribution this movement made to the education and welfare of street children within the context of philanthropic endeavour in mid-Victorian England is discussed.
    • A Place to Rest Your (Burnt) Bones? Mortuary Houses in Early Anglo-Saxon England

      Meyers Emery, Kathryn; Williams, Howard; George Eastman Museum; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2017-10-05)
      This article presents a fresh interpretation of square and rectangular mortuary structures found in association with deposits of cremated material and cremation burials in a range of early Anglo-Saxon (fifth-/sixth-century AD) cemeteries across southern and eastern England. Responding to a recent argument that they could be traces of pyre structures, a range of ethnographic analogies are drawn upon, and the full-range of archaeological evidence is synthesized, to re-affirm and extend their interpretation as unburned mortuary structures. Three interleaving significances are proposed: (i) demarcating the burial place of specific individuals or groups from the rest of the cemetery population, (ii) operating as ‘columbaria’ for the above-ground storage of the cremated dead (i.e. not just to demarcate cremation burials), and (iii) providing key nodes of commemoration between funerals as the structures were built, used, repaired and eventually decayed within cemeteries. The article proposes that timber ‘mortuary houses’ reveal that groups in early Anglo-Saxon England perceived their cemeteries in relation to contemporary settlement architectures, with some groups constructing and maintaining miniaturized canopied buildings to store and display the cremated remains of the dead.
    • Placing the Pillar of Eliseg: Movement, Visibility and Memory in the Early Medieval Landscape

      Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis/Society for Medieval Archaeology, 2017-06-19)
      The landscape context of the early 9th-century monument known as the Pillar of Eliseg is interrogated here for the first time with GIS-based analysis and innovative spatial methodologies. Our interpretation aims to move beyond regarding the Pillar as a prominent example of early medieval monument reuse and a probable early medieval assembly site. We demonstrate that the location and topographical context of the cross and mound facilitated the monument’s significance as an early medieval locus of power, faith and commemoration in a contested frontier zone. The specific choice of location is shown to relate to patterns of movement and visibility that may have facilitated and enhanced the ceremonial and commemorative roles of the monument. By shedding new light on the interpretation of the Pillar of Eliseg as a node of social and religious aggregation and ideological power, our study has theoretical and methodological implications for studying the landscape contexts of early medieval stone monuments.
    • Policing Chartism, 1839-1848: The role of the 'specials' reconsidered

      Swift, Roger; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2007-06-01)
    • Political tapestries of Philip the Bold and John the Fearless

      Wilson, Katherine A.; University of Chester (Cambridge Scholars, 2012-08-01)
      This article challenges the idea of medieval tapestry as 'propaganda' and explores the multifaceted functions of tapestries that depicted political events during the rules of the dukes of Burgundy 1364-1477.
    • The Power of Textiles. Tapestries of the Burgundian Dominions (1363-1477)

      Wilson, Katherine A.; The University of Chester (Brepols, 2018-10-03)
      Textiles were of fundamental importance to medieval polities and princes across Europe, economically and culturally. Tapestry was at the top end of the luxury textile market but was used by urban inhabitants and nobles. The Burgundian Dominions were the foremost producer of tapestry in the Middle Ages. However, the documentary evidence for the supply and suppliers of the textiles to the Burgundian dynasty, its many functions, and its re-use and repair, is understudied. This monograph explores a range of documentary evidence (ducal accounts, ducal and household inventories) to examine the suppliers of the textile to the Burgundian dynasty, its forms, functions and users, its role in gift-giving strategies, and patterns of re-use and repair. Thus, the book offers a contribution to the historical understanding of textiles as objects that contributed to the projection of social status and the cultural construction of power in the Burgundian polity.
    • The progressive army: US army command and administration, 1870-1914

      Barr, Ronald; University College Chester (Macmillan, 1998-03-01)
      This book discusses the creation of a modern professional army in late nineteenth and early twentieth century America.