• The Jew in the eruv, the Jew in the Suburb: Contesting the public face and the private space of British Jewry

      Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-04-15)
      Has cultural intolerance of Jews (and other minorities) in modern-day Britain led many Jews to prefer societal 'invisibility'? This chapter questions how such a discourse has played out through Jewish spatial practices and the British-Jewish presentation of those spatial practices, from the immigrant 'ghetto' of the fin de siècle East End to heated debates around the construction of an eruv in north-west London in recent decades.
    • 'The Jew' in late-Victorian and Edwardian culture: between the East End and East Africa

      Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2014-09)
      A book review of the edited collection, ‘The Jew’ in late-Victorian and Edwardian culture: between the East End and East Africa, edited by Nadia Valman and Eitan Bar-Yosef.
    • John Mitchel and his biographers

      Huggins, Michael; University of Chester (Irish Historical Studies Publications Ltd, 2012-11)
      This article discusses Mitchel's biographies, his commemoration in periodical and ephermeral sources, and the development of the historiography of Mitchel.
    • Kingship, Society, and the Church in Anglo-Saxon Yorkshire

      Pickles, Thomas; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2018-11-15)
      A monograph about the relationship between social and political structures, conversion to Christianity, and the building of an institutional Church in Yorkshire from c. 450-c. 1066.
    • Krieg in der Erinnerung – Krieg um die Erinnerung. Das Gedenken an die jüdischen Gefallenen nach 1918

      Grady, Tim; University of Chester (Hentrich & Hentrich, 2014-07-01)
      This book chapter discusses the memory and commemoration of World War I amongst Germany's Jewish population.
    • The land before symbol stones: a geophysical survey of Rhynie, Aberdeenshire and the excavation of a Middle Bronze Age structure near the Craw Stane, Barflat

      Gondek, Meggen M.; Noble, Gordon; Ramsay, Susan; Sheridan, Alison; University of Chester; University of Aberdeen; Freelance archaeobotanical specialist (Susan-Ramsay.co.uk); National Museums of Scotland (Society of Antiquaries of Scotland, 2015)
      The Rhynie Environs Archaeological Project (REAP) was initiated in 2005 as a three year (Phase 1) programme of research and fieldwork based in and around the village of Rhynie; the main aim was to study the landscape context of an important group of Pictish symbol stones. Eight symbol stones are known from the village, including one, the Craw Stane, which is likely to be in its original position. A series of cropmark features have also been identified surrounding the ‘Craw Stane,’ and the substantial early medieval remains are set within an area rich with prehistoric monuments. This article outlines the results of geophysical survey and a small targeted excavation conducted in 2005-2006. The surveys included a substantial gradiometer and a smaller resistivity survey that aimed to characterise and explore the extent and survival of archaeology around the symbol stone findspots. The results showed several discrete anomalies; one of these was targeted by a small-scale excavation and proved to be a burnt Middle Bronze Age timber structure. The article highlights the survey and excavation within its landscape context and provides a summary excavation report with specialist reports for the MBA building.
    • Landmarks for the dead: exploring Anglo-Saxon mortuary geographies

      Semple, Sarah; Williams, Howard; Durham University; University of Chester (Liverpool University Press, 2015-11-27)
      To move forward with a robust framework for understanding early medieval mortuary geographies, scholars must escape the romantic dichotomy of regarding the early medieval dead as either confined to the dead pagan ‘communities’ situated on the periphery and borders of the living world, or safely bounded within churchyards under Christian pastoral care. While there is widespread recognition of the variability in early medieval burial sites and their spatial components, only a handful of studies have considered them as places of memory within complex and evolving historic landscapes, despite evidence for rich overlapping and changing burial terrains across the period. This chapter offers a new introduction and framework for just such an approach to early medieval mortuary geography.
    • The landscape of a Swedish boat-grave cemetery

      Williams, Howard; Rundkvist, Martin; Danielsson, Arne; University of Chester (Oxbow, 2010-03-01)
      The paper integrates topographical and experiential approaches to the mortuary landscape of a Viking period inhumation-grave excavated in 2005 within the cemetery at Skamby, Kuddy parish, Östergötland province, Sweden. We argue that the landscape context was integral to the performance of the funerary ceremonies and the subsequent monumental presence of the dead in the landscape. We offer a way to move beyond monocausal explanations for burial location based on single-scale analyses. Instead, we suggest that boat-inhumation at Skamby was a commemorative strategy that operated on multiple scales and drew its significance from multiple landscape attributes.
    • Landscapes of Internment: British Prisoner of War Camps and the Memory of the First World War

      Grady, Tim; University of Chester (Cambridge University Press, 2019-07-26)
      During the First World War, all the belligerent powers interned both civilian and military prisoners. In Britain alone, over 100,000 people were held behind barbed wire. Despite the scale of this enterprise, interment barely features in Britain's First World War memory culture. By exploring the place of prisoner of war camps within the "militarized environment" of the home front, this article demonstrates the centrality of internment to local wartime experiences. Being forced to share the same environment meant that both British civilians and German prisoners clashed over access to resources, roads and the surrounding landscape. As the article contends, it was only when the British started to employ the prisoners on environmental improvement measures, such as land drainage or river clearance projects, that relations gradually improved. With the end of the war and closure of the camps, however, these deep entanglements were quickly forgotten. Instead of commemorating the complexities of the conflict, Britain's memory culture focused on more comfortable narratives; British military "sacrifice" on the Western Front quickly replaced any discussion of the internment of the "enemy" at home.
    • Lay Female Devotional Lives in the Counter Reformation

      Hillman, Jennifer; University of Chester (Brill Academic Publishers, 2017-01-01)
      In 1563, the Catholic Church responded to the Protestant challenge to the religious life as the most holy feminine state with the maxim aut maritus aut murus (wife or wall). The navigation of that dictum by early modern women across Catholic Europe has arguably been one of the dominant themes in the scholarship over the last thirty years. Certainly, there had always been the opportunity for women to lead a religious life outside of marriage and the cloister as beatas, tertiaries and beguines. Yet it was after the Council of Trent (1545-63) that women had to renegotiate a space in the world in which they could lead spiritually-fulfilling devotional lives. If this was one unintended legacy of 1517, then the quincentenary of the Reformation seems a timely moment to reflect on new directions in the now burgeoning historiography on lay women in Counter-Reformation Europe.
    • Learning the ropes in 'his own fields': Cromwell's early seiges in the east Midlands

      Gaunt, Peter; Chester College of Higher Education (The Cromwell Association, 2003-01-01)
      This article discusses Oliver Comwell's early military career in East Anglia and the east Midlands during the English Civil War.
    • A lifetime of service in the Roman Church

      Doran, John; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2009-01-28)
      This book chapter discusses the career of Pope Celestine, focusing on his time in the city of Rome.
    • Locating Ingetlingum and Suthgedling: Gilling West and Gilling East

      Pickles, Thomas; University of Chester (Maney Publishing/Taylor and Francis, 2009-09)
      This article revisits the location of two ecclesiastical sites from early medieval Yorkshire, arguing that Ingetlingum was Gilling West and Suthgedling was Gilling East. It thereby clarifies the relationship between politics and geography of monastic foundation.
    • "...looked on as a wonder, that never beheld his enemies in the face but returned from them crowned always with renown and honour...': Cromwell's contribution to parliament's military victories, 1642-1651

      Gaunt, Peter; University of Chester (The Cromwell Association, 2015-07)
      This article re-examines Oliver Cromwell's active military career and campaigns between autumn 1642 and autumn 1651 in order to evaluate how and how far Cromwell's own direct military activities and in-put contributed to parliament's overall success and victory in the first civil war of 1642-46, the so-called second civil war of 1648 and the establishment of the control of the English republic regime over Ireland and Scotland in 1649-51.
    • Ludlow's Trained Band: A study of militiamen in early Stuart England

      Worton, Jonathan; University of Chester (Society for Army Historical Research, 2013)
      This article discusses the Ludlow Trained Band as a case study for the organisation, social status, equipping, and training of the occasional amateur soldier of the early Stuart militia, 1624-1640. It is based on an analysis of Ludlow Trained Band's muster book in Shropshire Archives.
    • Luxury textiles in Italy, the Low Countries and neighbouring territories (14th to 16th centuries): a conceptual investigation

      Wilson, Katherine A.; Lambert, Bart; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2015-12-28)
      Throughout human history luxury textiles have been used as a marker of importance, power and distinction. Yet, as the essays in this collection make clear, the term 'luxury' is one that can be fraught with difficulties for historians. Focusing upon the consumption, commercialisation and production of luxury textiles in Italy and the Low Countries during the late medieval and early modern period, this volume offers a fascinating exploration of the varied and subtle ways that luxury could be interpreted and understood in the past. Beginning with the consumption of luxury textiles, it takes the reader on a journey back from the market place, to the commercialisation of rich fabrics by an international network of traders, before arriving at the workshop to explore the Italian and Burgundian world of production of damasks, silks and tapestries. The first part of the volume deals with the consumption of luxury textiles, through an investigation of courtly purchases, as well as urban and clerical markets, before the chapters in part two move on to explore the commercialisation of luxury textiles by merchants who facilitated their trade from the cities of Lucca, Florence and Venice. The third part then focusses upon manufacture, encouraging consideration of the concept of luxury during this period through the Italian silk industry and the production of high-quality woollens in the Low Countries. Graeme Small draws the various themes of the volume together in a conclusion that suggests profitable future avenues of research into this important subject.
    • Luxury Textiles in Italy, the Low Countries and Neighbouring Territories (Fourteenth to Sixteenth Centuries): A Conceptual Investigation

      Lambert, Bart; Wilson, Katherine A.; Durham University and Chester University (Ashgate, 2015-12-28)
      Throughout human history luxury textiles have been used as a marker of importance, power and distinction. Yet, as the essays in this collection make clear, the term ‘luxury’ is one that can be fraught with difficulties for historians. Focusing upon the consumption, commercialisation and production of luxury textiles in Italy and the Low Countries during the late medieval and early modern period, this volume offers a fascinating exploration of the varied and subtle ways that luxury could be interpreted and understood in the past. Beginning with the consumption of luxury textiles, it takes the reader on a journey back from the market place, to the commercialisation of rich fabrics by an international network of traders, before arriving at the workshop to explore the Italian and Burgundian world of production of damasks, silks and tapestries. The first part of the volume deals with the consumption of luxury textiles, through an investigation of courtly purchases, as well as urban and clerical markets, before the chapters in part two move on to explore the commercialisation of luxury textiles by merchants who facilitated their trade from the cities of Lucca, Florence and Venice. The third part then focusses upon manufacture, encouraging consideration of the concept of luxury during this period through the Italian silk industry and the production of high-quality woollens in the Low Countries. Graeme Small draws the various themes of the volume together in a conclusion that suggests profitable future avenues of research into this important subject.
    • Mapping ‘Wordsworthshire’: A GIS Study of Literary Tourism in Victorian Lakeland

      Donaldson, Christopher; Gregory, Ian; Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; University of Birmingham; Lancaster University; University of Chester (Taylor & Francis, 2015-08-14)
      This article answers the call for scholarship that models the implementation of geographic information systems (GIS) technologies in literary-historical research. In doing so, it creates a step change to the integration of digital methodologies in the humanities. Combining methods and perspectives from cultural history, literary studies, and geographic information sciences, the article confirms, challenges, and extends understanding of Victorian literary tourism in the English Lake District. It engages with the accounts of several nineteenth-century tourists, paying specific attention to Nathaniel Hawthorne’s English Notebooks and Hardwicke Drummond Rawnsley’s A Coach Drive at the Lakes, which are examined alongside contemporaneous guidebooks and other commercial tourist publications. In the process, the article draws attention to a spatial correlation between the route of the Ambleside turnpike (the Lake District’s principal coach road) and the major literary sites to which Victorian Lakeland visitors were guided. Recognizing this correlation, we contend, helps to deepen our appreciation of how the physical and imaginative geographies of the Lake District region interrelate. Specifically, it helps us appreciate how the Victorian fascination with the Lakeland’s literary associations was modulated not only by interest in the region’s other attractions, but also by material conditions on the ground.
    • Margaret of Anjou, Queen Consort of Henry VI: A reassessment of her role, 1445-54

      Dunn, Diana; Chester College of Higher Education (Alan Sutton, 1995-09-28)
      This book chapter discusses Margaret of Anjou and her reputation as a power-hungry queen.