• The Impact of Post-Writer Histories on the Significance of UK Literary Houses

      Pardoe, James; University of Chester (Common Ground, 2014)
      By exploring case studies from the UK, this paper investigates how post-writer histories of literary houses impact on the understanding of the lives and works of associated writers. The boundaries of this paper have been dictated by its place within twenty-first century manifestations of the survival, conservation and reproduction of literary houses associated with three writers active in the early nineteenth century: Lord Byron, John Keats and Sir Walter Scott. Many of the works within the literary house genre highlight the significance of the link between writers and their audiences. These links are created through the establishment of houses as sites of remembrance, as memorials, and as sensory markers. However, whereas commentators concentrate on the links being direct, this paper shows that the association is based on narratives filtered through those who were subsequently responsible for the houses. Consequently, the interpretation prevalent in the houses in the twenty-first century are the result of a long history based on the writers, and what was considered their significance by others over approximately two hundred years
    • In the chamber, in the grade robe, in the chapel, in a chest': The Possession and Uses of Luxury Textiles. The Case of Later Medieval Dijon

      Wilson, Katherine A.; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2015-12-28)
      Throughout human history luxury textiles have been used as a marker of importance, power and distinction. Yet, as the essays in this collection make clear, the term ‘luxury’ is one that can be fraught with difficulties for historians. Focusing upon the consumption, commercialisation and production of luxury textiles in Italy and the Low Countries during the late medieval and early modern period, this volume offers a fascinating exploration of the varied and subtle ways that luxury could be interpreted and understood in the past. Beginning with the consumption of luxury textiles, it takes the reader on a journey back from the market place, to the commercialisation of rich fabrics by an international network of traders, before arriving at the workshop to explore the Italian and Burgundian world of production of damasks, silks and tapestries. The first part of the volume deals with the consumption of luxury textiles, through an investigation of courtly purchases, as well as urban and clerical markets, before the chapters in part two move on to explore the commercialisation of luxury textiles by merchants who facilitated their trade from the cities of Lucca, Florence and Venice. The third part then focusses upon manufacture, encouraging consideration of the concept of luxury during this period through the Italian silk industry and the production of high-quality woollens in the Low Countries. Graeme Small draws the various themes of the volume together in a conclusion that suggests profitable future avenues of research into this important subject.
    • Interpretative narrative of the history of occupation

      Milner, Nicky; Taylor, Barry; Conneller, Chantal; Bayliss, Alex; University of York, University of Chester, University of Manchester, Historic England (White Rose University Press, 2018-04-16)
      A chronological narrative of the early Mesolithic occupation at Star Carr
    • Interpreting Wat’s Dyke in the 21st Century

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Archaeopress, 2020-11-26)
      Linear monuments offer special challenges in the context of the public archaeology of frontiers and borderlands. This chapter tackles the interpretive neglect of Britain’s second-longest early medieval earthwork, Wat’s Dyke, showing how its sparse and sporadic archaeological attention is reflected in poor and out-dated public archaeology and heritage interpretation. I evaluate the current media and mechanisms by which various publics – including global digital audiences, visitors to the Anglo-Welsh borderlands through which the monument runs, and local communities living in the Dyke’s environs in Flintshire, Wrexham and Shropshire – can access, experience and learn about Wat’s Dyke. Having identified how Wat’s Dyke is fragmented and obscure in the landscape despite its monumental presence, and how its digital resources are inadequate, I then propose new avenues for developing innovative interpretations of Wat’s Dyke for both existing and new audiences which aim to provide up-to-date and engaging resources and connect the monument to the rich cultural landscapes, past and present, through which it runs. I argue these recommendations provide the basis for both enhancing awareness and knowledge. I also argue they provide a more robust resources for current and future generations of research and public engagement. I also suggest they serve to combat the risk of pseudo-archaeological narratives and extremist political appropriations of Wat’s Dyke.
    • Introduction

      Milner, Nicky; Conneller, Chantal; Taylor, Barry; University of York, University of Manchester, University of Chester (White Rose University Press, 2018-04-12)
      Introduction to Star Carr Vol 1
    • Introduction. Minority History: From War to Peace

      Grady, Tim; Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-06-17)
      Against the backdrop of the First World War centenary, the introduction considers the place of minority groups in Europe’s commemorative plans. It argues that the governments of Britain, France and Germany have largely stuck to conventional narratives of the conflict, which have for the most part ignored diversity. Within local communities, however, far more innovative work has taken place; some of which has uncovered the variety of spaces that minority soldiers and civilians occupied during the First World War. The introduction concludes by considering historical writing on minorities in conflict and by outlining the agenda for this current volume.
    • Introduction: Archaeologies of Cremation

      Williams, Howard; Cerezo-Román, Jessica I.; Wessman, Anna; University of Chester; CalPol; University of Helsinki (Oxford University Press, 2017-04-27)
      Introduction to the edited collection 'Cremation and the Archaeology of Death'
    • Introduction: Mortuary Archaeology in Contemporary Society

      Giles, Melanie; Williams, Howard; University of Manchester; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2016-06-09)
      n/a
    • Introduction: public archaeologies as arts of engagement

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester
      By way of introduction to the book, this chapter sets out the principal recent developments and characteristics of public archaeology, focusing on the UK. By contextualising the chapters which originated as presentations in the 2017 student conference, as well as those contributions subsequently commissioned for the book, the specific theme of art/archaeology interactions in public archaeology is defined and its multiple facets are reviewed
    • Introduction: Rethinking Literary Mapping

      Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; Donaldson, Christopher; Cooper, David; University of Chester; Lancaster University; Manchester Metropolitan University (Routledge, 2016-05-20)
      This book is about the relationship between the practice of mapping, the application of geospatial technologies and the interpretation of literary texts. The contributors have been selected from a range of disciplines and they approach this relationship from different perspectives. Yet, notwithstanding these differences, their contributions are collectively defined by a shared preoccupation with the possibilities afforded – and the problems presented – by the use of digital mapping tools and techniques in literary studies and cultural-geographical research. Each of the following chapters, that is to say, explores the dynamic ways that the creation of literary maps can confirm meaning and challenge critical assumptions.
    • Introduction: stones in substance, space and time

      Williams, Howard; Kirton, Joanne; Gondek, Meggen M.; University of Chester; Big Heritage (Boydell Press, 2015-09-17)
      A triad of research themes – materiality, biography and landscape – provide the distinctive foci and parameters of the contributions to this book. The chapters explore a range of early medieval inscribed and sculpted stone monuments from Ireland (Ní Ghrádaigh and O’Leary), Britain (Gondek, Hall, Kirton and Williams) and Scandinavia (Back Danielsson and Crouwers). The chapters together show how these themes enrich and expand the interdisciplinary study of early medieval stone monuments, in particular revealing how a range of different inscribed and sculpted stones were central to the creation and recreation of identities and memories for early medieval individuals, families, households, religious and secular communities and kingdoms.
    • Introduction: The Mobility of Objects Across Boundaries 100-1700

      Wilson, Katherine A.; Clark, Leah R.; University of Chester; University of Oxford (Liverpool University Press, 2022-10-01)
      During the period 1000-1700 major transformations took place in material culture. Quite simply, more objects were manufactured and used than ever before and many objects travelled across geographic, political, religious, linguistic, class and cultural boundaries. By starting with a focus on past objects, this volume brings together essays from art historians, historians, archaeologists, literary scholars and museum curators to reveal the different disciplinary approaches and methods taken to the study of objects and what this can reveal about transformations in material culture 1000-1700. Contributors: Katherine A. Wilson, Leah R. Clark, Alison M. Leonard, Steven P. Ashby, Michael Lewis, Robert Maniura, Sarah Hinds, Christina Antenhofer, Alexandra van Dongen, Bettina Bildhauer, Julie De Groot, Jennifer Hillman, Ruth Whelan, Christopher Donaldson, Thomas Pickles.
    • Introduction: the Public Archaeology of Treasure

      Williams, Howard; Clague, Samuel; Carr, Natasha; Raine, James; University of Chester (Archaeopress, 2022-09-01)
      Setting the stage for The Public Archaeology of Treasure, this chapter presents the complex intersections of ‘treasure’ in archaeological teaching and research and archaeology’s interactions with a range of different publics on local, regional, national and international scales. The chapter also identifies the global issues in heritage conservation, management and interpretation as well as the looting of archaeological sites and the illicit trade in antiquities relating to ‘treasure(s)’ as legally defined, popularly perceived and metaphorically articulated. Having introduced the breadth and complexity of ‘treasure(s)’, we survey the 2020 student conference from whence this project derived before reviewing the span and foci of the book itself.
    • Introspection and the Self in Early Modern Spiritual (Auto) Biography

      Hillman, Jennifer; University of Chester (Bloomsbury Academic, 2020)
      This chapter will explore the intersections between memory, introspection and selfhood in spiritual biographical and autobiographical texts produced in France over the long eighteenth century. This chapter uses case studies from eighteenth-century France to destabilise teleological narratives surrounding the emergence of selfhood and subjectivity in the eighteenth century and its association with modernity and secularisation.
    • Irish migrants in Britain 1815-1914: A documentary history

      Swift, Roger; Chester College of Higher Education (Cork University Press, 2002-03-23)
      This edited book uses a range of contemporary records, including Parliamentary papers, social surveys, newspapers, letters, and reminiscences to explore the experiences of Irish migrants in Britain between 1815 and 1914. The sources focus on migration, settlement, employment, social conditions, religion, Radical and labour movements, nationalism, and Unionism.
    • The Jew in the eruv, the Jew in the Suburb: Contesting the public face and the private space of British Jewry

      Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-03-27)
      Has cultural intolerance of Jews (and other minorities) in modern-day Britain led many Jews to prefer societal 'invisibility'? This chapter questions how such a discourse has played out through Jewish spatial practices and the British-Jewish presentation of those spatial practices, from the immigrant 'ghetto' of the fin de siècle East End to heated debates around the construction of an eruv in north-west London in recent decades.
    • 'The Jew' in late-Victorian and Edwardian culture: between the East End and East Africa

      Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Taylor and Francis, 2014-09-02)
      A book review of the edited collection, ‘The Jew’ in late-Victorian and Edwardian culture: between the East End and East Africa, edited by Nadia Valman and Eitan Bar-Yosef.
    • John Mitchel and his biographers

      Huggins, Michael; University of Chester (Irish Historical Studies Publications Ltd, 2012-11)
      This article discusses Mitchel's biographies, his commemoration in periodical and ephermeral sources, and the development of the historiography of Mitchel.