• The 1st Battalion 22nd (The Cheshire Regiment) and the reasons for the military disaster at Mons

      Barr, Ronald; Chester College of Higher Education (Cheshire Community Council and Chester College, 1995)
      This article discusses the involvement of the 22nd (Cheshire) Regiment in the Battle of Mons in August 1914.
    • Fighting a lost battle: The Reichsbund juedischer Frontsoldaten and the rise of National Socialism

      Grady, Tim; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2010-03-01)
      This article argues that the actions of the German-Jewish war veterans’ association, the Reichsbund jüdischer Frontsoldaten (RjF), who have been strongly criticised because of their response to National Socialism, need to be understood in the light of the confusing mixed signals that shaped the first years of National Socialist rule.
    • The German-Jewish soldiers of the First World War in the history and memory

      Grady, Tim; University of Chester (Liverpool University Press, 2011-12-01)
      This book discusses they ways in which the role of German-Jewish soldiers who fought for Germany in World War I has been forgotten and remembered from 1914 to the late 1970s. German-Jewish soldiers were mourned after the end of the war and commemorated during the Weimar Republic. With the rise of Nazism, public commemoration of German-Jewish soldiers ceased as Germany's Jewish communities were persecuted. After World War II, the public memory of these soldiers was gradually subsumed into Holocaust remembrance.
    • Krieg in der Erinnerung – Krieg um die Erinnerung. Das Gedenken an die jüdischen Gefallenen nach 1918

      Grady, Tim; University of Chester (Hentrich & Hentrich, 2014-07-01)
      This book chapter discusses the memory and commemoration of World War I amongst Germany's Jewish population.
    • 'They died for Germany': Jewish soldiers, the German Army and conservative debates about the Nazi past in the 1960s

      Grady, Tim; University of Chester (SAGE, 2009-01-01)
      There has been an increasing recognition in recent historical writing that the late 1950s and early 1960s marked a significant shift in West German society's relationship to the Nazi past. Yet the older more conservative generation that dominated West Germany's politics of confronting the past in the immediate post-war years are largely absent from these narratives. Focusing on the actions of the Federal Republic's staunchly conservative Defence Minister, Franz Josef Strauß, this article argues that even the conservative establishment played a significant role in West Germany's evolving memory culture. In the early 1960s, Strauß promoted the republication of a book of German-Jewish soldiers' war letters from the First World War. The collection enabled him to portray a different side of West Germany at a time when attention had focused back onto the crimes of the Nazi era. Despite this opportunism, the article contends that Strauß's support for the new book encouraged other conservative institutions to engage more fully with the recent past.