• Antiquity at the National Memorial Arboretum

      Williams, Howard; University of Chester (Routledge, 2013-01-16)
      The paper explores the use of ancient and historic material cultures and architectures within the recent resurgence in public commemoration in the UK. Using the case study of the National Memorial Arboretum (Staffordshire), the study focuses on how ancient designs (including prehistoric, classical and medieval styles and forms) interleave with the arboreal, geological and celestial themes of the memorial gardens. Together these designs serve to create a multitude of temporal poises by which auras of commemorative perpetuity and regeneration are projected and sustained. The paper proposes that archaeologists can bring their expertise to bear on the investigation of the complex, varied allusions to the past within contemporary landscapes of memory.
    • Cremation and contemporary churchyards

      Williams, Howard; Williams, Elizabeth; University of Chester (Routledge, 2019-07-05)
      A contemporary archaeological investigation of cremation memorials in English and Welsh churchyards.
    • Geographical Information Systems as a Tool for Exploring the Spatial Humanities

      Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; Gregory, Ian; University of Chester; Lancaster University (Routledge, 2016-07-28)
      This chapter will introduce the basics of geographical information systems (GIS) for humanities scholarship. It will provide a brief overview of how using GIS software can help researchers understand the geographies within their sources. It will briefly introduce how GIS models features and places on the Earth’s surface so that the reader is gets a basic understanding of the core terminology associated with GIS. It will then talk through the basics of how a researcher gets their sources into GIS software; how they can query, integrate and analyse data within GIS; and how they can disseminate their results using maps and electronic outputs such as KML files that can be disseminated using Google Earth. The conclusion will look briefly at what a researcher can and cannot expect to gain from using GIS and stress that mapping is only a part of the research process – good at identifying and describing patterns but limited in its ability to explain them. The chapter will be include several diagrams and will be extensively referenced.
    • 'Hands across the tea': Renegotiating Jewish Identity and Belonging in Post-war Britain

      Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-08-07)
      In contemporary Britain, Jewish identity – what it means to be ‘Jewish’, how it is to be enacted and performed, and indeed the parameters and environments of Jewish life itself – have become more elastic. This chapter suggests that these changes can, in part, be understood as a consequence of Jewish suburbanisation across the twentieth century. As strangers became neighbours, the intimacies facilitated by spatial proximity and a shared investment in ‘place’ altered notions of ‘Jewishness’ and ‘Britishness’ in turn. However, as an examination of the period 1945-1966 suggests, the inter-play between and melding of minority and majority identity was rarely straight-forward.
    • Introduction: Rethinking Literary Mapping

      Murrieta-Flores, Patricia; Donaldson, Christopher; Cooper, David; University of Chester; Lancaster University; Manchester Metropolitan University (Routledge, 2016-05-20)
      This book is about the relationship between the practice of mapping, the application of geospatial technologies and the interpretation of literary texts. The contributors have been selected from a range of disciplines and they approach this relationship from different perspectives. Yet, notwithstanding these differences, their contributions are collectively defined by a shared preoccupation with the possibilities afforded – and the problems presented – by the use of digital mapping tools and techniques in literary studies and cultural-geographical research. Each of the following chapters, that is to say, explores the dynamic ways that the creation of literary maps can confirm meaning and challenge critical assumptions.
    • The Jew in the eruv, the Jew in the Suburb: Contesting the public face and the private space of British Jewry

      Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Routledge, 2015-03-27)
      Has cultural intolerance of Jews (and other minorities) in modern-day Britain led many Jews to prefer societal 'invisibility'? This chapter questions how such a discourse has played out through Jewish spatial practices and the British-Jewish presentation of those spatial practices, from the immigrant 'ghetto' of the fin de siècle East End to heated debates around the construction of an eruv in north-west London in recent decades.
    • Memories of Suburbia: Autobiographical Fiction and Minority Narratives

      Ewence, Hannah; University of Chester (Routledge, 2013-04-02)
      Historians have recently begun to engage with fiction as a compelling and elucidative historical source. Novels deemed to engender autobiographical qualities have garnered particular attention for their presumed historical ‘authenticity’, yet memory work encoded within their narratives has rarely been considered. This chapter explores how memory functions within and through the conceptualisation of place within The Buddha of Suburbia (1990); White Teeth (2000) and Disobedience (2006). Bound up in apparently familiar images of London’s peripheries are individual remembrances of the past which intersect with and problematise collective memories of suburbia, and complicate the relationship between history, memory, fiction and identity.
    • US Foreign Policy in the Horn of Africa: From Colonialism to Terrorism

      Jackson, Donna; University of Chester (Routledge, 2017-10-31)
      Examining American foreign policy towards the Horn of Africa between 1945 and 1991, this book uses Ethiopia and Somalia as case studies to offer an evaluation of the decision-making process during the Cold War, and consider the impact that these decisions had upon subsequent developments both within the Horn of Africa and in the wider international context. The decision-making process is studied, including the role of the president, the input of his advisers and lower level officials within agencies such as the State Department and National Security Council, and the parts played by Congress, bureaucracies, public opinion, and other actors within the international environment, especially the Soviet Union, Ethiopia and Somalia. Jackson examines the extent to which influences exerted by forces other than the president affected foreign policy, and provides the first comprehensive analysis of American foreign policy towards Ethiopia and Somalia throughout the Cold War. This book offers a fresh perspective on issues such as globalism, regionalism, proxy wars, American aid programmes, anti-communism and human rights. It will be of great interest to students and academics in various fields, including American foreign policy, American Studies and Politics, the history of the Cold War, and the history of the Horn of Africa during the modern era.
    • Visualizing Jews: An Introduction to Literary and Material Representations of Jewishness and Judaism Through the Ages

      Ewence, Hannah; Spurling, Helen; University of Chester; University of Southampton (Routledge, 2015-04-24)
      A wide-ranging introduction that offers a new approach for examining the relationship between Jews, Judaism, Jewishness and visual culture. The editors suggest that debates surrounding literary and material images within Judaism and Jewish life are part of an on-going strategy of image management; that is, the urge to shape, direct, authorise and contain Jewish literary and material images and encounters with those images.
    • Vizualising Jews through the Ages: Literary and Material Representations of Jewishness and Judaism

      Ewence, Hannah; Spurling, Helen; University of Chester; University of Southampton (Routledge, 2015-04-24)
      This volume explores literary and material representations of Jews, Jewishness and Judaism from antiquity to the twenty-first century. Gathering leading scholars from within the field of Jewish Studies, it investigates how the debates surrounding literary and material images within Judaism and in Jewish life are part of an on-going strategy of image management - the urge to shape, direct, authorize and contain Jewish literary and material images and encounters with those images - a strategy both consciously and unconsciously undertaken within multifarious arenas of Jewish life from early modern German lands to late twentieth-century North London, late Antique Byzantium to the curation of contemporary Holocaust exhibitions.