• Earls and earldoms during King Stephen's reign

      White, Graeme J.; Chester College of Higher Education (Liverpool University Press, 2000-09-01)
      This book chapter discusses the proliferation of earldoms in the reign of King Stephen and the reasons for their creation.
    • The German-Jewish soldiers of the First World War in the history and memory

      Grady, Tim; University of Chester (Liverpool University Press, 2011-12-01)
      This book discusses they ways in which the role of German-Jewish soldiers who fought for Germany in World War I has been forgotten and remembered from 1914 to the late 1970s. German-Jewish soldiers were mourned after the end of the war and commemorated during the Weimar Republic. With the rise of Nazism, public commemoration of German-Jewish soldiers ceased as Germany's Jewish communities were persecuted. After World War II, the public memory of these soldiers was gradually subsumed into Holocaust remembrance.
    • Landmarks for the dead: exploring Anglo-Saxon mortuary geographies

      Semple, Sarah; Williams, Howard; Durham University; University of Chester (Liverpool University Press, 2015-11-27)
      To move forward with a robust framework for understanding early medieval mortuary geographies, scholars must escape the romantic dichotomy of regarding the early medieval dead as either confined to the dead pagan ‘communities’ situated on the periphery and borders of the living world, or safely bounded within churchyards under Christian pastoral care. While there is widespread recognition of the variability in early medieval burial sites and their spatial components, only a handful of studies have considered them as places of memory within complex and evolving historic landscapes, despite evidence for rich overlapping and changing burial terrains across the period. This chapter offers a new introduction and framework for just such an approach to early medieval mortuary geography.