• Why Flash Fiction? Because of a Parrot and a Porn Star, Of Course

      Chantler, Ashley; University of Chester (2016-08-19)
      Article on flash fiction.
    • William Carleton, Folklore, the Famine, and the Irish Supernatural

      Fegan, Melissa; University of Chester (Supernatural Studies Association, 2015-09-31)
      This article examines the significance of the supernatural in the works of the nineteenth-century Irish author William Carleton, and in particular the ways in which his grounding in folklore and his reflection of the Great Famine are important in his work.
    • ‘With, all down darkness wide, his wading light?’: Light and Dark in Gerard Manley Hopkins’s ‘The Candle Indoors’ and ‘The Lantern out of Doors’

      Leahy, Richard; University of Chester (Göteborg University, 2018-06-30)
      Gerard Manley Hopkins was a poet inspired by, and very much interested in, processes of light and vision. Within his works he presents a flexible structure of metaphor that is based on the relationship between light and dark. These interchangeable elements come to symbolise Hopkins’s spirituality and religion, as well as the challenges his beliefs were subjected to, while also outlining a very nuanced interest in perception and the principles of sight. Dennis Sobolev identifies what he terms ‘the split world’ of Hopkins as he explores the ‘semiotic phenomenology’ of his writing: ‘To put it briefly “semiotic phenomenology” as it is understood here–proceeds from the grounds that are transcendent to the distinction between the subject and the object, the physical and the imaginary, nature and culture, or any other metaphysical distinctions of the “kind”’ (Sobolev 2011: 4). What Sobolev suggests is the dichotomous liminality of Hopkins’s ideas and poetry. The most prominent example of this may well be Hopkins’s own notion of the ‘inscape’: the term, itself a portmanteau of words connoting the inner being (in, inside, interior) and the outer experience (scape, landscape, escape), attempts to address what Hopkins saw as reconcilable differences between the inner character or ‘essence’ of something and the object itself (Philips 2009: xx). Also, his use of the term ‘instress’ crosses similar binaries, as it is most commonly associated with the impression, or feeling, something may relate to the careful observer.
    • Woman and personal property in the Victorian novel

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2010-11-28)
      This book discusses female possession of property in the works of Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Henry James.
    • Women and Personal Property in the Victorian Novel

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2010-11-28)
      How key changes to the married women’s property laws contributed to new ways of viewing women in society are revealed in Deborah Wynne’s study of literary representations of women and portable property during the period 1850 to 1900. While critical explorations of Victorian women’s connections to the material world have tended to focus on their relationships to commodity culture, Wynne argues that modern paradigms of consumerism cannot be applied across the board to the Victorian period. Until the passing of the 1882 Married Women’s Property Act, many women lacked full property rights; evidence suggests that, for women, objects often functioned not as disposable consumer products but as cherished personal property. Focusing particularly on representations of women and material culture in Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Henry James, Wynne shows how novelists engaged with the vexed question of women’s relationships to property. Suggesting that many of the apparently insignificant items that ‘clutter’ the Victorian realist novel take on new meaning when viewed through the lens of women’s access to material culture and the vagaries of property law, her study opens up new possibilities for interpreting female characters in Victorian fiction and reveals the complex work of ‘thing culture’ in literary texts.
    • World of Rich Water

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Butcher's Dog, 2017-06-01)
      Poem
    • Wuthering Heights: Character studies

      Fegan, Melissa; University of Chester (Continuum, 2008-02-21)
      This book discusses the characters of Mr Lockwood, Nelly Dean, Mr and Mrs Earnshaw, Mr and Mrs Linton, Joseph, Hindley Earnshaw, Edgar Linton, Isabella Linton, Heathcliff, Catherine Earnshaw, Hareton Earnshaw, Linton Heathcliff, and Catherine Linton.
    • Young Ireland and Beyond

      Fegan, Melissa; University of Chester (Cambridge University Press, 2020-02-28)
      This chapter examines the ideology, aspirations, and political and literary legacy of the Young Ireland group.
    • Your City's Place Names: Leeds

      Parkin, Harry (English Place-Name Society, 2017-08-07)
      This book covers the principal districts (officially or unofficially recognized), some well-known buildings, features, and street-names, and the largest open spaces in the City of Leeds. For the purposes of this dictionary, the “City of Leeds” is defined by the Leeds metropolitan district area, though a few names outside but very close to this zone are also included. The metropolitan area of Leeds is one of the largest government districts in England, and so this dictionary covers a relatively large area, including places such as Wetherby, which is approximately 10 miles north-east of Leeds city centre.