• The Sensation Novel and the Victorian Family Magazine

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2001-09-22)
      Victorian sensation novels, with their compulsive plots of crime, transgression and mystery, were bestsellers. Deborah Wynne analyses the fascinating relationships between sensation novels and the magazines in which they were serialized. Drawing upon the work of Wilkie Collins, Mary Braddon, Charles Dickens, Ellen Wood, and Charles Reade, and such popular family journals as All The Year Round, The Cornhill, and Once a Week, Wynne highlights how novels and magazines worked together to engage in the major cultural and social debates of the period.
    • Shakespeare and the Renaissance

      Rees, Emma L. E.; University of Chester (Continuum, 2010-02-28)
      This book chapter discusses Renaissance thought, the courtly love tradition, and Elizabeth I and the English Renaissance.
    • Sheela’s voracity and Victorian veracity

      Rees, Emma L. E.; Chester College of Higher Education (University of Wales Press, 2002-05-02)
    • Short on Sugar, High on Honey: Micro Love Stories

      Hazuka, Tom; Budman, Mark; Blair, Peter; Chantler, Ashley; N/A (Flash: The International Short-Short Story Press, 2018-01-18)
      300 little love stories; seven to thirteen words.
    • Sing star

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Poetry Quarterly, 2014-07-10)
    • Sleepers

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (2014-10-01)
    • Software tools for big data resources in family names dictionaries

      Rambousek, Adam; Parkin, Harry; Horak, Ales; Masaryk University; University of the West of England (Maney Publishing, 2018-04-09)
      This paper describes the design and development of specific software tools used during the creation of Family Names in Britain and Ireland (FaNBI) research project, started by the University of the West of England in 2010 and finished successfully in 2016. First, the overview of the project and methodology is provided. Next section contains the description of dictionary management tools and software tools to combine input data resources.
    • 'Something so utterly unprecedented in the annals of human life': William Carleton and the Famine

      Fegan, Melissa; Chester College of Higher Education (Four Courts Press, 2003-11-01)
      This book chapter discusses how the Great Famine is reflected in the work of William Carleton.
    • Source Code

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Ravenglass Poetry Press, 2013-03-27)
    • Speaker sex effects on temporal and spectro-temporal measures of speech

      Herrmann, Frank; Cunningham, Stuart P.; Whiteside, Sandra P.; University of Chester ; University of Sheffield ; University of Sheffield (Cambridge University Press, 2014-04-01)
      This study investigated speaker sex differences in the temporal and spectro-temporal parameters of English monosyllabic words spoken by thirteen women and eleven men. Vowel and utterance duration were investigated. A number of formant frequency parameters were also analysed to assess the spectro-temporal dynamic structures of the monosyllabic words as a function of speaker sex. Absolute frequency changes were measured for the first (F1), second (F2), and third (F3) formant frequencies (ΔF1, ΔF2, and ΔF3, respectively). Rates of these absolute formant frequency changes were also measured and calculated to yield measurements for rF1, rF2, and rF3. Normalised frequency changes (normΔF1, normΔF2, and normΔF3), and normalised rates of change (normrF1, normrF2, and normrF3) were also calculated. F2 locus equations were then derived from the F2 measurements taken at the onset and temporal mid points of the vowels. Results indicated that there were significant sex differences in the spectro-temporal parameters associated with F2: ΔF2, normΔF2, rF2, and F2 locus equation slopes; women displayed significantly higher values for ΔF2, normΔF2 and rF2, and significantly shallower F2 locus equation slopes. Collectively, these results suggested lower levels of coarticulation in the speech samples of the women speakers, and corroborate evidence reported in earlier studies.
    • Stark choices and brutal simplicity: the blunt instrument of constructed oppositions in news editorials

      Davies, Matt; University of Chester (Routledge, 2019-05-10)
      This chapter uses a typology of oppositional syntactic triggers (e.g. ‘either X or Y’, ‘X but Y’) to show how the conflicting positions of opposing political parties are reproduced and perpetuated by the UK press as simplistic mutually exclusive binaries in General Election campaigns. The premise is that political discourse is predisposed to representing complex moral positions, policies and practices as simple polarised ‘stark’ contrasts, often reducing them to a rudimentary choice between GOOD and EVIL, POSITIVE and NEGATIVE, US and THEM. Using a corpus of data from the daily editorial (or ‘leader’) columns of UK national newspapers in the 2010, 2015 and 2017 UK general election campaigns, the chapter shows how the conflict can be constructed through discourse by the artificial prising apart of more ambiguous and intricate political positions and is strongly facilitated by the very nature of the syntax available for representing alternative views, disguising any shades of grey which are likely to exist. A search for syntactic frames and triggers based on a typology developed by Davies (2012, 2013) and Jeffries (2010), show how oppositions are used to promote Conservative policies at the expense of the Labour Party by constructing ‘stark contrasts’ between them.
    • Stern, gwiazda or star: Screening receptive vocabulary skills across languages in monolingual and bilingual German–Polish or German–Turkish children using a tablet application

      Schaefer, Blanca; Ehlert, Hanna; Kemp, Lisa; Hoesl, Kristina; Schrader, Verena; Warnecke, Clarissa; Herrmann, Frank (SAGE Publications, 2018-11-09)
    • Streaks Ahead

      Chantler, Ashley; University of Chester (2016-04-08)
      Flash fiction.
    • 'Streaks Ahead'

      Chantler, Ashley; University of Chester (Ad Hoc Fiction, 2017-12-01)
      Flash fiction.
    • Stronger faster shorter: Flash fictions

      Swann, David; Blair, Peter; Chantler, Ashley; University of Chichester ; University of Chester (Flash: The International Short-Short Story Press, 2015-04-22)
      A collection of twenty-five short-short stories.
    • Studying English literature

      Chantler, Ashley; Higgins, David; University of Chester ; University of Leeds (Continuum, 2010-02-28)
      Studying English Literature offers a link between pre-degree study and undergraduate study by introducing students to: the history of English literature from the Renaissance to the present; the key literary genres (poetry, prose, and drama); a range of techniques, tools and terms useful in the analysis of literature; critical and theoretical approaches to literature. It is designed to improve close critical reading skills and evidence-based discussion; encourage reflection on texts' themes, issues and historical contexts; and demonstrate how criticism and literary theories enable richer and more nuanced interpretations. This one-stop resource for beginning students combines a historical survey of English literature with a practical introduction to the main forms of literary writing. Case studies of key texts offer practical demonstrations of the tools and approaches discussed. Guided further reading and a glossary of terms used provide further support for the student. Introducing a wide range of literary writing, this is an indispensable guide for any student beginning their study of English Literature, providing the tools, techniques, approaches and terminology needed to succeed at university.
    • Stuka

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (2015)
    • Stylistics, Point of View and Modality

      Neary, Clara; University of Chester (Routledge, 2014-02-13)
      This chapter comprises an introduction to one of the most intensively researched areas of stylistic enquiry, that of narratorial point of view, and its interaction with the linguistic system of modality.
    • Subtitling Pride and Prejudice

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Magma Poetry, 2017-12-01)
      Poem
    • Superintelligence and Mental Anxiety from Mary Shelley to Ted Chiang

      Leahy, Richard; University of Chester (Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction, 2018-08-31)
      Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein is one of the earliest depictions of augmented intelligence; within the creature, we witness a very human intelligence that bases its understanding of the world on the convergence of human senses and human thought, yet one that presents these concepts in the uncanny shade of the doppelganger. In this portrayal, there is an anxiety that creeps in to the creature’s understanding of the world and its own subjectivity. It is based on language acquisition and knowledge. Once the creature becomes not only sentient, but intelligent, he begins to feel the existential weight of reality in a way that prefigures characters in subsequent Science Fiction, as well as presciently acknowledging recent pathological and scientific studies into the connection between mental health and intellect.