• The Realisation of Electric Light in the Early Twentieth Century

      Richard Leahy; University of Chester (De Gruyter, 2015-10-01)
      Perceptions of electric light in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century witnessed a rapid turnaround of popular opinion on the light source; following its widespread adoption from the 1880s, it was at first met with derision, before perceptions shifted around the fin-de-siècle period, and it eventually grew into the light source that would come to define twentieth century. It evolved from something that was perceived as a symbol of the modern - it was a fantastical presence in the literature of Jules Verne many years before its realisation for example - to something that solidified a sense of modern life. Electricity, Alex Goody writes, 'transformed Victorian Culture', suggesting that "it was electric light that epitomised this transforming power […] the coming of electric light is a transformation of culture at a fundamental level; it marks the coming of what Marshall McLuhan, in Understanding Media, calls 'the electric age' (Goody 2011: 7) Electric light was both symbol and catalyst of the late nineteenth-century emergence of the truly modern world of capitalism and mass-society. McLuhan claims that this early emergence of the electric age had a distinct cultural and psychological impact on the way people thought of modernity: "electric light is pure information […] a medium without a message," further suggesting that its light "has no content, and in this purity it ushers in a modern world where instant communication connects us in a web of interaction"(McLuhan 2001: 8). McLuhan's analysis of the early electric age suggests a continuation of the burgeoning qualities and perceptions of the processes of gaslight - the invention of a networked system of light took the power of lighting away from an individual; people no longer felt as intimate a connection with the light they inhabited as they did in fire or candlelight.
    • 'Refracted light': Peter Jackson's The lord of the rings

      Walsh, Chris; University of Chester (Chester Academic Press, 2009-08-22)
      This book chapter discusses the the role of death in the Lord of the rings trilogy.
    • Responses to the 1851 Great Exhibition in Household Words

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (The Dickens Fellowship, 2002)
      This article examines the ways in which the Great Exhibition of 1851 was discussed in Dickens's newly-formed magazine, Household Words.
    • Review of Charteris-Black, J. (2017). Fire Metaphors: Discourses of Awe and Authority. London: Bloomsbury.

      Neary, Clara; University of Chester (John Benjamins, 2018-10-23)
      Book review of Charteris-Black, J. (2017). Fire Metaphors: Discourses of Awe and Authority. London: Bloomsbury.
    • Review of Ecofeminist Science Fiction: International Perspectives on Gender, Ecology, and Literature

      Hay, Jonathan; University of Chester (The Science Fiction Foundation, 2021-08-06)
      Book review of Ecofeminist Science Fiction: International Perspectives on Gender, Ecology, and Literature, ed. Douglas A. Vakoch (Routledge, 2021, 232pp, £120).
    • Review of Helen Kingstone and Kate Lister (eds), Paraphernalia! Victorian Objects (Routledge, 2018) pp. xiii + 267 (£115.00)

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Sage, 2019-05-01)
      A review of Helen Kingstone and Kate Lister (eds), Paraphernalia! Victorian Objects (Routledge, 2018) pp. xiii + 267 (£115.00).
    • Revolting Women: Performing the New Explicit

      Rees, Emma L. E.; University of Chester (University of Chester Press, 2018-06-11)
      Casey Jenkins's performance art and a qualitative analysis of the vitriolic comments about it of members of the public in a UK national newspaper. Redefining pornography as 'the new explicit' because of the artist's autonomy and (non-monetised) control over her work.
    • Save the name: Mysticism and modern French though

      Bradley, Arthur; University College Chester (Paternoster Press, 2003-06-01)
      This book chapter discusses the relationship between mysticism and continental philosophy, particularly current critical thinking on Christian mysticism and modern French thought.
    • Scenes of ‘incredible outrage’: Dickens, Ireland, and A tale of two cities

      Wynne, Deborah; University College Chester (AMS Press, 2006-10)
    • Scenes of “Incredible Outrage”: Dickens, Ireland and A Tale of Two Cities

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (AMS Press, 2006-11-30)
      This article examines Dickens's A Tale of Two Cities in relation to its serialisation in All The Year Round (1859-60). It draws connections between the novel, the magazines journalism and events happening in Ireland in 1858-9. Dickens's witnessing of a wave of religious revivals on his tour of Ireland, this article argues, fed into his descriptions of revolutionary France in A Tale of Two Cities.
    • Schisms

      Chantler, Ashley; University of Chester (2016-02)
      Flash fiction.
    • The school of night

      Wall, Alan; Chester College of Higher Education (Vintage, 2001)
      Questions have been raised over the last two centuries about the authenticity of William Shakespeare's claim to have authored the works attributed to him. One intriguing line of argument has always been the Marlovian one. Marlowe is thought to have been a member of a mysterious group, the School of Night, whose centre was that mercurial figure Walter Raleigh. The novel explores the authorship question through the focus of the School of Night, 1590s science and belief, the conflict between Ptolemaic and Copernican science, and the nature of authorship itself.
    • Scoring ecstasy: MDMA, consumerism and spirituality in the early fiction of Irvine Welsh

      Stephenson, William; Chester College of Higher Education (Taylor & Francis, 2003-04)
      This article discusses how Irvine Welsh, explores ecstasy's ability to enhance communication and offer people a version of religious ritual which means that the drug has the potential, at least, to modify subjectivity and intersubjective relationships in his work. The article focuses mainly on Welsh's novel Marabou Stork Nightmares, the novella 'The Undefeated' (from the collection Ecstasy) and the title story of the collection The Acid House.
    • Sea Change: Peter Adams’s “Ovum d’Aphrodite”

      Rees, Emma L. E.; University of Chester (2016-03-31)
      A short essay contextualising and exploring the sculptor Peter Adams's piece 'Ovum d'Aphrodite'.
    • The Sensation Novel and the Victorian Family Magazine

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2001-09-22)
      Victorian sensation novels, with their compulsive plots of crime, transgression and mystery, were bestsellers. Deborah Wynne analyses the fascinating relationships between sensation novels and the magazines in which they were serialized. Drawing upon the work of Wilkie Collins, Mary Braddon, Charles Dickens, Ellen Wood, and Charles Reade, and such popular family journals as All The Year Round, The Cornhill, and Once a Week, Wynne highlights how novels and magazines worked together to engage in the major cultural and social debates of the period.
    • Shakespeare and the Renaissance

      Rees, Emma L. E.; University of Chester (Continuum, 2010-02-28)
      This book chapter discusses Renaissance thought, the courtly love tradition, and Elizabeth I and the English Renaissance.
    • Sheela’s voracity and Victorian veracity

      Rees, Emma L. E.; Chester College of Higher Education (University of Wales Press, 2002-05-02)
    • Short on Sugar, High on Honey: Micro Love Stories

      Hazuka, Tom; Budman, Mark; Blair, Peter; Chantler, Ashley; N/A (Flash: The International Short-Short Story Press, 2018-01-18)
      300 little love stories; seven to thirteen words.
    • Sing star

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Poetry Quarterly, 2014-07-10)
    • Sleepers

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (2014-10-01)