• 3 January

      Chantler, Ashley; University of Chester (2016-01)
      Flash fiction.
    • Absences

      Seed, Ian; University of Chester (Long Poem Magazine, 2015-05)
      Poem sequence, consisting of thirteen sections.
    • Adjective Stacking in Northern Sotho

      Flanagan, Paul; University of Chester (University of Lancaster, 2013-07)
      In this paper, I investigate the nature of complex nominal modification in Northern Sotho, a Southern Bantu language and an official language of South Africa. Adjectives in Northern Sotho have traditionally been recognised as a subclass of nouns, based on morphological similarities between nouns and adjectives. Based on recent work which proposes that all languages have a distinct word class ‘adjective’, I argue that adjectives in Northern Sotho constitute an independent grammatical category. I base this suggestion on the common morpho-syntactic behaviour of members of this class and present an in-depth analysis of the ordering of elements in Northern Sotho poly-adjectival nominal phrases. There has been some limited discussion of the theory that there are universal structures in adjective order across different languages, although sequencing in languages with postnominal adjectives is desperately under-researched. Using a combination of corpus data and original fieldwork, I provide support for the suggestion that there are patterns in the syntax of complex modification strings which operate on a universal level, above that of individual languages.
    • Al Dente

      Chantler, Ashley; University of Chester (The Curved House, 2015-12)
      Flash fiction.
    • The alternative A-Z of English literature: All you need to know about 101 great authors

      Kelsey, James; Markham, James; Chantler, Ashley; Claridge, Terry; University of Chester (The Alternative Press, 2008)
      The authors felt suicidal when they got to 'Beckett'.
    • 'The amazing cinematograph': Cinema and illusion in Francis Ford Coppola's Bram Stoker's 'Dracula'

      Foster, Paul G.; University of Chester (Chester Academic Press, 2009)
      This chapter considers the use of special effects designed to reflect the style of early cinema in the Francis Ford Coppola film version of Dracula.
    • ...And the contraflow system glittered

      Stephenson, William; University of Chester (Antiphon, 2015)
    • Anthony Trollope's representation of the Great Famine

      Siddle, Yvonne; Chester College of Higher Education (Fourt Courts Press, 2004)
      This book chapter discusses the relationship between Trollope and Ireland, where he lived for eighteen years.
    • Approaching Charlotte Brontë in the Twenty-First Century

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Wiley, 2017-12-12)
      This essay offers an overview of recent criticism in Charlotte Brontë studies. In the year of Brontë's bicentenary, it takes stock of some of the latest approaches and topics covered, including material culture, disability, screen and stage adaptations, sexuality, regional identity, education, trading networks, the periodical press, and the law. Although much of this new criticism contributes to a fresh understanding of Charlotte Brontë's work and legacy, Jane Eyre continues to dominate most critical discussions, and this essay calls for more attention to be paid to The Professor, Shirley, and Villette. It welcomes those historicist readings that continue the important work of contextualizing Brontë's oeuvre, a project that has transformed her from the reticent provincial writer of semi‐autobiographical fiction presented by early critics into a political and socially engaged
    • Arnold Bennett and Material Culture

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Churnet Valley Books, 2015-04-20)
      This essay explores Arnold Bennett's engagement with material culture, from the ceramics produced by the pottery industry to the textiles used in domestic life. It argues that Bennett developed a 'romance of material culture' in his novels and short stories.
    • "As if on a magic carpet": An Interview with Vanessa Gebbie

      Blair, Peter; Chantler, Ashley; University of Chester (Intellect, 2014-10)
      An interview with one of the UK's leading flash-fiction and short-story writers.
    • The aura of facticity: the ideological power of hidden voices in news reports

      Davies, Matt; University of Chester (Bloomsbury Academic, 2020-04-16)
      This chapter explores the most significant stylistic features of and relationships between the two most ubiquitous genres in print news reporting – the editorial column (the anonymous official line of the newspaper on the issues of the day) and the so-called ‘straight’ or ‘hard’ news reports which typically constitute the front pages (and many of the first few inside pages) of the daily national (UK) newspapers. It provides a framework for identifying some of the most significant characteristic stylistic features of these genres, focussing specifically on how a defining distinction is the absence and presence of authorial voice in the news report and editorial column respectively. However, the claim, for instance by that “journalism derives a great deal of its legitimacy from the postulate that it is able to present true pictures of reality to objectivity in the news report” (Wien, 2005:3) is challenged. The chapter argues that the aura of facticity projected by the absence of often highly rhetorical features manifest in editorial columns, camouflages attitudes and values embedded within the equivalent news reports, and in doing so performs significant ideological work in hiding those values. Using news reports and editorials published in five UK national newspapers published on 13 July 2018, based around the visit of US President Donald Trump to the UK, the chapter demonstrates how the attitudes and values expressed in editorial columns are still in evidence in their equivalent front page news reports and that despite the best intentions of professional journalists to report events using standard techniques, objectivity is and can only be a myth.
    • Badmouth

      Wall, Alan (Harbour Books, 2014-01-01)
      A novel about how a ventriloquist's dummy takes over the mind of a man.
    • Bark and Hz scaled F2 Locus equations: Sex differences and individual differences

      Herrmann, Frank; Cunningham, Stuart P.; Whiteside, Sandra P.; University of Chester, University of Sheffield (International Phonetic Association, 2015-08)
      This study investigated speaker sex differences in F2 Locus equations (F2 LEs) based on linearly (Hz) and tonotopically (Bark) scaled formant measurements. F2 data based on English monosyllabic words produced by thirteen women and eleven men were tonotopically scaled and F2 LEs were derived for both the linear and tonotopically scaled formant values. Although the overall sex difference in the F2 LE slope values for women and men was significant for both sets of F2 measures, the magnitude of this difference decreased for the Bark (.047) compared to the Hz (.063) scale. The individual data revealed a significant correlation between the slope values of the Hz and Bark scale [r = .974; p<.0001] suggesting a lawful relationship between the two metrics. Further probing revealed that the F2 LE data from women were affected more by the Bark conversion than the data from men.
    • "Be Prepared!" (But Not Too Prepared): Scouting, Soldiering and Boys’ Roles in World War I

      Andrew, Lucy; University of Chester (Berghahn Books, 2018)
      This article examines the shifting representation of the ideal of masculinity and boys’ role in securing the future of the British Empire in Robert Baden-Powell’s Boy Scout movement from its inauguration in 1908 to the early years of the First World War. In particular, it focuses on early Scout literature’s response to anxieties about physical deterioration, exacerbated by the 1904 Report of the Inter-Departmental Committee on Physical Deterioration. In Baden-Powell’s Scouting handbook, Scouting for Boys (1908), and in early editions of The Scout – the official magazine of the Scout movement – there was a strong emphasis on an idealised image of the male body which, implicitly, prepared Boy Scouts for their future role as soldiers. The reality of war, however, forced Scouting literature to acknowledge the restrictions placed upon boys in wartime and to redefine the parameters of boys’ heroic role in defense of the Empire accordingly.
    • Blocked

      Chantler, Ashley; University of Chester (2015-12-31)
      Flash fiction.
    • Book Review: The Language of Jane Austen by Joe Bray, 2018. London: Palgrave: pp. 182 ISBN 9783319721613

      Neary, Clara; University of Chester (Sage, 2019-05-15)
      Review of The Language of Jane Austen by Joe Bray, 2018.
    • 'Both kinds in one/Both male and female': Ate, Lust and hermaphroditic Venus in Book IV of Edmund Spenser's The Faerie Queene

      Atkin, Graham (Chester College, 1996-03)
      This working paper, originally delivered at the Voicing Women conference at the University of Liverpool in April 1992, discusses Book IV of The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser. The paper focuses on the figures of "Ate, mother of debate", Lust, the androgynous Venus, and the love story of Amoret and Scudamour.
    • The Boy Detective in Early British Children's Literature: Patrolling the Borders between Boyhood and Manhood

      Andrew, Lucy; University of Chester (Palgrave Macmillan, 2017-11-05)
      This book maps the development of the boy detective in British children’s literature from the mid-nineteenth to the early-twentieth century. It explores how this liminal figure – a boy operating within a man’s world – addresses adult anxieties about boyhood and the boy’s transition to manhood. It investigates the literary, social and ideological significance of a vast array of popular detective narratives appearing in ‘penny dreadfuls’ and story papers which were aimed primarily at working-class boys. This study charts the relationship between developments in the representation of the fictional boy detective and changing expectations of and attitudes towards real-life British boys during a period where the boy’s role in the future of the Empire was a key concern. It emphasises the value of the early fictional boy detective as an ideological tool to condition boy readers to fulfil adult desires and expectations of what boyhood and, in the future, proper manhood should entail. It will be of particular importance to scholars working in the fields of children’s literature, crime fiction and popular culture.