• British Settler Emigration in Print, 1832-1877

      Piesse, Jude; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2015-12-24)
      An unprecedented number of emigrants left Britain to settle in America, Australia, Canada, and New Zealand during the Victorian period. Utilizing new digital resources and methodologies alongside more traditional modes of scholarship, British Settler Emigration in Print, 1832-1877 presents the first book-length study of the periodical print culture that imagined, mediated, and galvanized this important stage of empire history. It presents extensive new research on how settler emigration was registered within Victorian periodicals and situates its focus on British texts and contexts within a broader, transnational framework. The book argues that the Victorian periodical was an inherently mobile form which had an unrivalled capacity to both register mass settler emigration and moderate its disruptive potential. Part one focuses upon settler emigration genres that featured within mainstream, middle-class periodicals, incorporating the analysis of emigrant voyage texts, emigration themed Christmas stories, and serialized novels about settlement. These genres are cohesive, domestic, and reassuring, and thus of a different character from the adventure stories often associated with Victorian empire. Part two examines a feminist and radical periodical emigration literature that often challenged dominant settler ideologies. Alongside its examination of ephemeral emigration texts, the book offers fresh readings of key works by Charles Dickens, Anthony Trollope, Edward Bulwer-Lytton, Thomas Martin Wheeler, and others. Ultimately, the book shows how periodical settler emigration literature transforms our understanding of both the culture of Victorian empire and Victorian literature and culture as a whole. It also makes significant intersections into debates about periodical form and the role of digitization within Victorian Studies.
    • Family Names

      Parkin, Harry; Hanks, Patrick (Oxford University Press, 2016-01-21)
      A summary of family naming systems around the world, and the current state of research in the field of surname study.
    • 'The Great Famine in Fiction, 1901-2015'

      Fegan, Melissa; University of Chester
      This chapter considers Irish writers’ continual reimagining of the Great Famine and the way it has shaped understandings of the past and present. In doing so, it addresses novels and short stories from nineteenth-century writers such as William Carleton, Mary Anne Hoare, and Margaret Brew, who sought to explain or reinterpret the catastrophe while it was still a living memory. The return of the Famine in later historical and neo-Victorian fiction by writers such as Liam O’Flaherty, John Banville, and Joseph O’Connor is considered in light of the association between Famine fiction and present-day crises in the post-independence era. The discussion also extends to the resurgence in literary interest in the Famine in the 1990s and early 2000s, which, the chapter suggests, was due not only to the greater exposure of the Famine in public discourse but also to a revival of insecurities that seemed to belong to the past.
    • Material Culture

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2017-11-29)
      An annotated bibliography evaluating publications and online resources relating to Victorian material culture.
    • McEWAN. The Strange Case of the Resurrected Penis in ‘Solid Geometry’

      Alsop, Derek; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2015-05-05)
      The article draws attention to a narrative anomaly in Ian McEwan's short story 'Solid Geometry'.
    • Readers and Reading Practices

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Oxford University Press, 2011-11-03)
      This chapter discusses ways of reading and publishing in the early to mid nineteenth century.