• Charlotte Brontë’s Frocks and Shirley’s Queer Textiles

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2013-04-23)
      This chapter discusses the role of textiles and fashion in Charlotte Brontë’s novel, Shirley (1849). It argues that Brontë uses sewing and fashion as a way of representing female bonds. This is contrasted with her representations of the 'male' world of the mill-owner.
    • Circulation and Stasis: Feminine Property in the Novels of Charles Dickens

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2012-07-16)
      This chapter explores the figure of Miss Havisham, and other female characters, in Charles Dickens's Great Expectations (1860). It argues that the novel's exploration of portable property, usually discussed in terms of Wemmick, is particularly focused on the museal qualities of Miss Havisham's Satis House and the objects it contains.
    • Cordelia's can't: Rhetorics of reticence and (dis)ease in King Lear

      Rees, Emma L. E.; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2010-12-01)
      Susan Sontag in "Illness as Metaphor and AIDS and Its Metaphors" points to the vital connection between metaphors and bodily illnesses, and though her analyses deals mainly with modern literary works. This collection of essays examines the vast extent to which rhetorical figures related to sickness and health - metaphor, simile, pun, analogy, symbol, personification, allegory, oxymoron, and metonymy - inform medieval and early modern literature, religion, science, and medicine in England and its surrounding European context. In keeping with the critical trend over the past decade to foreground the matter of the body and the emotions, these essays track the development of sustained, nuanced rhetorics of bodily disease and health-physical, emotional, and spiritual. The contributors to this collection approach their intriguing subjects from a wide range of timely, theoretical, and interdisciplinary perspectives, including the philosophy of language, semiotics, and linguistics; ecology; women's and gender studies; religion; and, the history of medicine. The essays focus on works by Dante, Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Milton among others; the genres of epic, lyric, satire, drama, and the sermon; and cultural history artifacts such as medieval anatomies, the arithmetic of plague bills of mortality, meteorology, and medical guides for healthy regimens.
    • An Introduction to Ford Madox Ford

      Chantler, Ashley; Hawkes, Rob; University of Chester. University of Teesside (Ashgate, 2015-12-28)
      For students and readers new to the work of Ford Madox Ford, this volume provides a comprehensive introduction to one of the most complex, important and fascinating authors. Bringing together leading Ford scholars, the volume places Ford’s work in the context of significant literary, artistic and historical events and movements. Individual essays consider Ford’s theory of literary Impressionism and the impact of the First World War; illuminate The Good Soldier and Parade’s End; engage with topics such as the city, gender, national identity and politics; discuss Ford as an autobiographer, poet, propagandist, sociologist, Edwardian and modernist; and show his importance as founding editor of the groundbreaking English Review and transatlantic review. The volume encourages detailed close reading of Ford’s writing and illustrates the importance of engaging with secondary sources.
    • Literature and authenticity, 1780-1900: Essays in honour of Vincent Newey

      Chantler, Ashley; Davies, Michael; Shaw, Philip; University of Chester ; University of Liverpool ; University of Leicester (Ashgate, 2011-10-28)
      Individually and collectively, these essays establish a new direction for scholarship that examines the crucial activities of reading and writing about literature and how they relate to 'authenticity'. Though authenticity is a term deep in literary resonance and rich in philosophical complexity, its connotations relative to the study of literature have rarely been explored or exploited through detailed, critical examination of individual writers and their works. Here the notion of the authentic is recognised first and foremost as central to a range of literary and philosophical ways of thinking, particularly for nineteenth-century poets and novelists. Distinct from studies of literary fakes and forgeries, this collection focuses on authenticity as a central paradigm for approaching literature and its formation that bears on issues of authority, self-reliance, truth, originality, the valid and the real, and the genuine and inauthentic, whether applied to the self or others. Topics and authors include: the spiritual autobiographies of William Cowper and John Newton; Ruskin and travel writing; British Romantic women poets; William Wordsworth and P.B. Shelley; Robert Southey and Anna Seward; John Keats; Lord Byron; Elizabeth Gaskell; Henry David Thoreau; Henry Irving; and Joseph Conrad. The volume also includes a note on Professor Vincent Newey with a bibliography of his critical writings.
    • A well-spun yarn: Margaret Cavendish and Homer's Penelope

      Rees, Emma L. E.; Chester College of Higher Education (Ashgate, 2003)
    • Woman and personal property in the Victorian novel

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2010-11-28)
      This book discusses female possession of property in the works of Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Henry James.
    • Women and Personal Property in the Victorian Novel

      Wynne, Deborah; University of Chester (Ashgate, 2010-11-28)
      How key changes to the married women’s property laws contributed to new ways of viewing women in society are revealed in Deborah Wynne’s study of literary representations of women and portable property during the period 1850 to 1900. While critical explorations of Victorian women’s connections to the material world have tended to focus on their relationships to commodity culture, Wynne argues that modern paradigms of consumerism cannot be applied across the board to the Victorian period. Until the passing of the 1882 Married Women’s Property Act, many women lacked full property rights; evidence suggests that, for women, objects often functioned not as disposable consumer products but as cherished personal property. Focusing particularly on representations of women and material culture in Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Henry James, Wynne shows how novelists engaged with the vexed question of women’s relationships to property. Suggesting that many of the apparently insignificant items that ‘clutter’ the Victorian realist novel take on new meaning when viewed through the lens of women’s access to material culture and the vagaries of property law, her study opens up new possibilities for interpreting female characters in Victorian fiction and reveals the complex work of ‘thing culture’ in literary texts.